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Opinion: We Can’t Afford Not to Pay Interns
This issue is too important to ignore, Sen. Chris Van Hollen writes

Sen. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., who represents much of the D.C. suburbs, says the city is one of the most expenses places to lives in the country. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Capitol Hill interns have been an institution within an institution since I first worked for Congress in the late 1980s — and long before. From answering phones, to helping constituents, to legislative research, they are a vital part of any congressional office. I know my team could not function without them, and we are thankful for their tireless work.

But our thanks aren’t enough — we need to provide compensation for these hardworking young people.

Opinion: When the Survey Says the Holocaust Is Fading Away
When we see data like this, it says something is terribly wrong

A Polish Holocaust survivor from Dallas attends a survivor memorial service at the Holocaust Memorial Museum in 2011. Data released last week suggests there’s something terribly wrong with history education in America, Winston writes. (Chris Maddaloni/CQ Roll Call file photo.)

Just a few days ago, on April 12, the world commemorated International Holocaust Remembrance Day. Much of the news this year focused on a new national survey, conducted by Schoen Consulting for the Claims Conference, to assess just how much Americans, especially young Americans, know about the Holocaust today.

The results were disheartening and disturbing. People are beginning to forget.

Opinion: When the Party of Conscience Slinks From the Fight
What was supposed to be a power struggle for the ages has turned out to be more like a used-car sale

Principles abandoned. Lawmakers fleeing. If Sen. Barry Goldwater could see the Republican Party now, he wouldn’t recognize it, Murphy writes. (Courtesy the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division)

Ever since Donald Trump won the Republican nomination for president, national headlines have predicted an epic fight for the heart and soul of the Republican Party sometime in the very near future. In this corner is the big-mouthed New York billionaire untethered to any particular policy besides winning. In the other are the conscience-driven, high-minded intellectuals of modern-day conservatism, who see themselves as the keepers of the party flame.

Two ideologies will enter the fight, but only one can emerge, and the good money up to now has been on the conservatives. After all, they have the experience, the knowledge and each other to count on, while Trump has only himself.

Opinion: How Much Longer Can the Trump Coalition Hold?
New study confirms demographic trends remain tough for Republicans

While demographic trends favor Democrats, white voters without college degrees — a key part of President Donald Trump’s base — will remain crucial to both parties’ electoral chances, Fortier writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After Mitt Romney’s defeat in 2012, establishment Republicans, citing unfavorable demographic trends, called for the GOP to improve its performance with growing ethnic minorities. Donald Trump, seemingly poking his finger in the eye of this establishment, pursued the opposite course, attracting more support from white voters without college degrees whose ranks were shrinking but becoming more Republican.

Demographic trends remain tough for Republicans, and a new study released Monday by a coalition of think tanks confirms this. The GOP would benefit from boosting support among new immigrant groups and doubling down on the white working class. But going forward, the Trump strategy of increasing support among non college whites over expanding its vote share among immigrant groups has advantages in both the popular vote and the electoral college, and will likely be at least a part of future GOP election game plans.

Opinion: Who Will Spur the Next Energy Revolution? Not Private Industry
Some say the government can no longer afford to invest in energy research, but we say it can’t afford not to

Solar panels are seen from the air on approach to Indianapolis International Airport on April 2. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

In just a decade, America’s energy landscape has been transformed. Wind and solar units have cropped up across the country, quadrupling their output. Our oil production has nearly doubled over the same period, while natural gas has swelled by a third, due in large part to drilling and seismology advances that ushered in the shale revolution.

Who developed those technologies? Researchers at America’s national labs, thanks to decades of federal funding.

Opinion: When Trump Dreams About Our National Parks, He Sees Oil
‘America’s best idea’ deserves better than drill-everywhere schemes

Theodore Roosevelt National Park, named after the president who expanded the National Park Service, could be open to oil and gas exploitation if a Trump administration proposal that incentivizes more drilling on public lands gains traction. (Courtesy Eddy23/Wikimedia Commons/CC BY-SA 4.0)

For most Americans, the mention of national parks brings to mind the scenic vistas of the Grand Canyon and Yosemite Valley or contemplative memorials like the Statue of Liberty and Pearl Harbor. Few people think of the tremendous amount of infrastructure — from roads and bridges to visitors centers and sewer systems — that supports 330 million annual visitors and $34.9 billion in annual economic output.   

The National Park Service manages a broad network that requires routine repairs, rehabilitation and maintenance. Due to chronic underfunding and the age of our iconic parks, much of the infrastructure that supports park visitation needs serious upkeep.

Opinion: Is Pelosi Still the Gift that Keeps on Giving for Republicans?
Democratic leader’s value as a GOP political target may be fading

Relying on attacking House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, here with Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer last month, as a campaign strategy won’t be enough to carry the day for Republicans, Winston writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Is Nancy Pelosi all she’s cracked up to be or a political conundrum? I’m not talking about her control of the House Democratic Caucus or her ability to raise enormous sums of money for House Democratic candidates. She seems to have a pretty good track record in both areas.

I’m talking about the nearly legendary notion in the GOP consulting community that Pelosi is the gift that keeps on giving to Republican candidates and campaigns.

Opinion: The Infrastructure Plan Is Like Our Roads. Both Are Falling Apart
Lately it seems that infrastructure is always the ‘next’ item on the agenda

With Speaker Paul D. Ryan backing a fragmented approach, the door could be closing on an infrastructure overhaul, Nellenbach and Varn write. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Congress is beginning to give up on the idea of a sweeping infrastructure bill, pointing to the looming midterm elections and the funding boosts that passed in the recent omnibus package. Even President Donald Trump seems to have accepted that one of his principal campaign proposals has stalled once again, admitting recently that infrastructure will “probably have to wait until after the election.”

Lately it seems that infrastructure is always the “next” item on the agenda — the one Congress will tackle as soon as it gets beyond the latest crisis. As our roads and water systems continue to deteriorate, it is now the infrastructure plan itself that needs immediate repair.

Opinion: To Reinvent Rural Health Care, Ditch the ‘One-Size-Fits-All’ Model
Geography shouldn’t be an impediment to quality care

A man waits at a mobile clinic in Olean, New York, in June 2017. Rural communities should be given the flexibility to figure out a health care delivery system that works for them, Dorgan and Krutsick write. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images file photo)

As policymakers grapple over how to best deliver quality, affordable health care, they cannot ignore the unique challenges faced by the 46 million Americans living in rural areas.

Not only do rural residents rank worse than their urban counterparts on many health metrics such as obesity, tobacco usage and suicides, their communities also face shortages of health care workers and geographic challenges that make it more difficult to address these concerns.

Opinion: Trump Era Corruption — Where’s the Outrage?
Here’s something the president does better than Bill Clinton

Compared to the current president, Bill Clinton was a paragon of ethics during his time in the White House, Shapiro writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It was the other Bill Clinton scandal — the half-forgotten one that didn’t involve sex.

To jump-start his 1996 re-election campaign with an early advertising blitz, Clinton straddled the ethical boundaries by offering access to the White House in exchange for six-digit checks. In Clinton’s defense, there were no proven quid pro quos — just an atmosphere of sleaziness.