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The Coincidence of Bomb Recipients, Trump and Far-Right Rhetoric
White House ducks questions about president’s win-at-all-costs polarizing approach

Then-President Barack Obama speaks during a campaign rally with 2016 Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton on July 5, 2016 in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

ANALYSIS | The recipients of explosive devices sent this week have so far shared a commonality: harsh criticism by President Donald Trump and far-right followers.

But White House officials were in no mood Wednesday to entertain the notion that the president’s descriptions of Democrats as “evil” and news organizations as the “enemy of the people” might have helped lead a bomber to build devices and mail them to Democratic mega-donor George Soros, former President Barack Obama, 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and CNN. A building in Miami that houses an office for former Democratic National Committee head Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz was also evacuated Wednesday.

Wednesday Won’t Be Your Average Recess Hump Day
Rosenstein testimony, Senate Judiciary, Trump rally to showcase tribal warfare

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein will be interviewed by the leaders of two House committees on Wednesday, part of a busy time at the Capitol and White House. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Embattled Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein finally testifies. The Senate Judiciary Committee will continue its autumn of discontent. And President Donald Trump will sign opioids legislation before taking his midterms road show to Wisconsin.

No, Wednesday will not be your typical recess day. Rather, it will be a cable news bonanza chronicling the country’s era of tribal political warfare.

Turkey’s Version of Khashoggi Death ‘Flies in the Face’ of Saudi Claims, Pence Says
Vice president promises an ‘American response’ once White House has all facts

People hold posters of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi during a protest organized by members of the Turkish-Arabic Media Association at the entrance to Saudi Arabia's consulate on Oct. 8 in Istanbul, Turkey. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images)

Turkish President Recep Erdogan’s description of a Saudi plot to kill Washington journalist Jamal Khashoggi, who died inside a Saudi consulate in Turkey, “flies in the face” of the royal family’s previous descriptions of what happened, Vice President Mike Pence said Tuesday.

“We will look for ways to hold accountable” those Saudis proved to be involved, Pence said.

From Adams to Pence: Long History of Memorable VP Tie-Breakers
If Kavanaugh vote is deadlocked, vice president would put him on Supreme Court

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh (left) walks up the Capitol's Senate steps with Vice President Mike Pence for a meeting with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., on July 10. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and President Donald Trump face a high-stakes Saturday showdown with a handful of key senators that will decide whether the Supreme Court tilts to the right — perhaps for decades to come. But it might fall to Vice President Mike Pence to put him on the highest bench in the land.

After the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh — who has faced multiple sexual assault allegations and criticism for his angry rebuttal that included sharp criticism of Senate Democrats — cleared a procedural hurdle Friday morning, McConnell and Trump needed to secure 50 GOP votes.

Daines Now Says He Will be Back in D.C. for Kavanaugh Vote If Needed
Republican senator is scheduled to be in Montana this weekend for his daughter’s wedding

Sen. Steve Daines, R-Mont., speaks with reporters following the cloture vote on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court on Friday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Republican Sen. Steve Daines sounded optimistic about getting back to D.C. for a final vote on Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination a day after saying he wouldn’t be around if the vote came Saturday.

Daines told The Associated Press on Thursday that he would be in Montana for his daughter’s wedding, whether the vote was held then or not.

Few Clues on Key Votes on Kavanaugh’s Fate
McConnell and Republicans said they were trying to work out a mid-morning vote

Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin of West Virginia arrives to view the FBI supplemental background report on Supreme Court Justice nominee Brett Kavanaugh on Friday morning, before a procedural vote on the Senate floor later in the morning. Manchin’s vote is considered a key one on whether Kavanaugh will be seated on the court. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

A new FBI investigation and a full day for senators to read it did nothing to clarify what might happen Friday in the partisan ruckus over Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Republicans said they were trying to work out a mid-morning cloture vote on the nomination, but one was not officially announced when the Senate adjourned Thursday. The vote is expected to happen as early as 10:30 a.m. Friday.

Pence Accuses China of Trying to Upend ‘America’s Democracy’
Trump touts relationship with Xi, but has little to show for it

Vice President Mike Pence warned China to avoid meddling in "America's democracy" in a speech Thursday that likely will further chill relations with the Asian power. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

The Trump administration struck a hard line on China Thursday, with Vice President Mike Pence alleging that Russia’s meddling in U.S. elections “pales in comparison” to China’s ongoing actions.

The vice president accused the Chinese government of “employing a whole-of-government approach to advance its influence and benefit its interests.” He cited the conclusions of career U.S. intelligence officials as he said China is “employing this power in more proactive and coercive ways to interfere in the domestic policies and politics of the United States.”

On Typically Unifying 9/11, Trump Attacks His Domestic Foes
On somber anniversary, president dubs DOJ, FBI ’so terrible‘

President Donald Trump began the 17th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks by lashing out at his own political foes. (Getty Images)

Wreaths were laid and bells tolled Tuesday for the fallen in Manhattan, at the Pentagon and in a field in Pennsylvania. Officials spoke, as did Vice President Mike Pence, about “honor and remembrance.” But President Donald Trump started off the 9/11 anniversary by lashing out at his political opponents.

“For the families of the fallen and all those looking on, the cherished final moments with your loved ones … seem like yesterday. Just know that your nation understands,” Pence said at the Pentagon, striking the tone George W. Bush and Barack Obama administration officials did on Sept. 11 anniversaries past.

Big Sky Trip Highlights Trump’s Focus on Senate Races
President also involved in gubernatorial races, Pence takes House contests

President Donald Trump at the White House in July. He will spend part of Thursday and Friday in Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota campaigning and raising funds for GOP Senate and gubernatorial candidates. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Donald Trump will return to Montana on Thursday night for another political rally aimed at ousting incumbent Democrat Jon Tester, part of the president’s midterm focus on keeping the Senate under Republican control.

White House and Trump campaign officials have signaled Trump will hit as many as eight states this month alone before picking up the pace in October as the midterm campaign enters its final sprint. Trump will continue to publicly stump for Republican Senate and gubernatorial incumbents and candidates, while Vice President Mike Pence primarily focuses on competitive House races.

McCain’s ‘Iron Will’ Saluted as Late Senator Celebrated at Capitol
Arizona senator returns to Washington for services before burial at Annapolis

Cindy McCain pays respects to her late husband Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., as he lies in state in the Capitol Rotunda on August 31, 2018.(Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The skies outside the Capitol opened up Friday morning as a military honor guard carried the drenched flag-draped casket of Sen. John McCain up the stairs of the Capitol for the final time before bright sunshine later emerged. Inside, Vice President Mike Pence and congressional leaders feted a man who was a walking force of nature.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell called the Arizona Republican’s death a “great loss” for the country but told a packed Capitol Rotunda they were gathered to “celebrate a great life” that featured “six decades of devotion to the American idea and the cause of human freedom.”