kevin-mccarthy

15 Members Pledge to Withhold Speaker Vote Without Rule Changes
8 Democrats, 7 Republicans part of bipartisan Problems Solvers Caucus

Rep. Tom O’Halleran, D-Ariz., said he will not vote for a speaker who doesn’t back the Problem Solvers Caucus proposed rule changes for making the House more bipartisan. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

At least 15 members of the bipartisan Problems Solvers Caucus have pledged to withhold their vote for speaker if the candidate that emerges as the majority party’s nominee does not back the caucus’s proposed rule changes.

The Problem Solvers unveiled a package of rules changes in late July dubbed “Break the Gridlock.” The proposals aim to open up the legislative process in a way that prioritizes bipartisanship.

Ryan, Bipartisan Group Decry NYT Op-Ed Writer
‘Proper guardrails on any president isn’t staff subterfuge, it’s elections and our constitutional checks,’ Rubio says

Paul Ryan joined a handful of bipartisan lawmakers in knocking the author of an anonymous op-ed critical of President Donald Trump published Wednesday by The New York Times. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan joined a handful of lawmakers from both parties who have decried a New York Times op-ed author for publishing a Wednesday criticism of the president anonymously.

The Wisconsin Republican called for the author to vacate his or her job.

Despite Trump Rhetoric, Polling, House GOP Leaders Shrug Off Potential for Fall Drama
Ryan confident there won't be a government shutdown, saying, ’I think the results will prove itself‘

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., is confident there will not be a government shutdown this fall. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Whether it was the potential of a government shutdown or President Donald Trump suggesting that his Department of Justice erred in bring charges against two Republican congressmen just months ahead of the midterms, Speaker Paul D. Ryan is shrugging off the controversy.  

Consider it part of the “no drama” strategy House GOP leaders laid out to their conference Wednesday morning.

Why Republican Candidates Aren’t Getting Asked Who They’d Back for Speaker
Democratic candidates constantly get asked about Pelosi, but Republicans are rarely questioned about McCarthy, Jordan

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, wants to be House Republicans' top leader, but GOP candidates are rarely asked whether they support his bid. That might be about to change, if Democratic criticism and advertising has anything to do with it. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democratic candidates can’t escape the question, “Do you support Nancy Pelosi?” But how many Republican candidates can say they’ve heard the equivalent about Kevin McCarthy or Jim Jordan, the two GOP speaker hopefuls?

A Roll Call analysis found only 13 press reports in which Republican candidates in the 86 competitive House races were asked about or commented on McCarthy or Jordan in the context of who should be the next Republican leader.

House Republicans Considering Leadership Bids — So Far
Much will depend on whether Republicans hold the majority and if so how speaker’s race unfolds

From left, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., Chief Deputy Whip Patrick McHenry, R-N.C., and House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La. All three men are looking to move up in leadership next Congress . (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Republicans will have a new leader next Congress since Speaker Paul D. Ryan is retiring, but will there be additional changes in their top ranks?

The answer to that question will depend in large part on whether Republicans can hold onto their majority in the November midterms, and if they do, how the speaker’s race unfolds.

Jeff Denham Claims He’ll Be Transportation Chair — But What About Sam Graves?
Both GOP lawmakers want to lead panel; Steering Committee will decide

Rep. Jeff Denham, R-Calif., said at an event Friday that he’s going to be the next Transportation Committee chairman, ignoring the other member running to head the Transportation and Infrastructure panel. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

California Rep. Jeff Denham told a local GOP women’s group Friday that he will be the next House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee chairman, ignoring the fact that he is not the only member running for the position, the Republicans are far from a lock to hold their majority and Denham himself faces a potentially competitive race. 

The panel’s current chair, Pennsylvania Rep. Bill Shuster, is retiring. Missouri Rep. Sam Graves and Denham are both running to replace him. The Republican Steering Committee, a panel of 30-some members primarily comprised of GOP leadership and regional representatives, selects committee leaders.

Speaker Race Could Hinge on Who Agrees to Change the Rules
House members have an ultimatum for those who covet the top spot: No changes, no gavel

Rep. Josh Gottheimer, D-N.J., is among the members demanding wholesale rules changes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Whichever party controls the House in 2019, the next speaker won’t secure the job easily and will likely have to promise major changes to how the institution operates, with members demanding that as a condition for support.

Frustration has grown among rank-and-file members for years as leadership usurped decision-making power from committees. Lawmakers have pushed to change House and caucus rules to return influence to individuals and committees, but with limited success.

House Candidate Calls First Lady ‘Hoebag’
House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy wants Mark Roberts banned from Twitter

First lady Melania Trump listens as President Donald Trump welcomes recently freed American detainees from North Korea back to the U.S. in May. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy is calling for Twitter to ban an independent congressional candidate for making sexist slurs against first lady Melania Trump.

Mark Roberts, who is challenging Oregon Republican Rep. Greg Walden for his seat, was responding to a tweet from Turning Point USA founder Charley Kirk, who pointed out that the first lady has a much smaller staff than her predecessor Michelle Obama. Kirk said there are only five White House staffers as opposed to the 44 who worked for Obama.

Podcast: House Lawmakers Leave Town With Much to Do Before Midterms
CQ on Congress, Episode 113

Speaker of the House Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis.(Photo By Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call)

Road Ahead: House Ready for Recess. Senate? Not So Much
Defense authorization, more spending bills among the week's highlights

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy hopes to get the defense authorization wrapped up this week. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

This is the last week the House is in session before members depart for the August recess — expect senators to be grumbling about that.

But the House does have a fairly sizable legislative agenda before heading home through Labor Day. The highlighted legislation includes Republican-led efforts to expand and update health savings accounts and to roll back some of the taxes levied under the 2010 health care law.