kevin-mccarthy

Why the Speaker Race Won’t Fade Away Until November
Potential candidates lack a path to 218 votes and need time to build coalitions

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., is the front-runner to succeed retiring Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., but there is a long way to go until the November elections. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Republicans don’t know if they will be holding a speaker’s race or a contest for minority leader come November, but that isn’t stopping them from preparing for the former. 

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, the leading candidate to replace retiring Speaker Paul D. Ryan, needs more time to build sufficient support to win a still-hypothetical speaker’s race. The same goes for other members eyeing the position.

New Twists Emerge in Leadership Race to Replace Paul Ryan
Conservative Freedom Caucus founder Jim Jordan says he’d consider a run

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, holds his jacket over his head as he walks down the House steps in a light rain following a vote on Wednesday, Oct. 11, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Two twists emerged Friday in the leadership race to replace retiring Speaker Paul D. Ryan. House Freedom Caucus founding member Jim Jordan said he’d consider a run while Ryan endorsed Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy.

“There is no speaker’s race right now,” Jordan told reporters. “Paul Ryan is the speaker. If and when there is, I’ve been urged by colleagues to consider that and I am definitely open to that. Right now though the focus has got to be on the next six months, us keeping the majority.”

Analysis: Leadership Race Not Over Despite Scalise Declining to Challenge McCarthy
McCarthy still needs to shore up support from conservatives, GOP candidates

From left, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., and Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., are presenting a united front for now about the future leadership lineup. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Republican leaders made moves Thursday to give the appearance that there won’t be any infighting about who should replace retiring Speaker Paul D. Ryan as head of the conference. Don’t be fooled.

The race to replace Ryan is not over — unless Republicans lose the majority in November. In that scenario, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy would have the insider track to being elected minority leader since it would only require a simple majority vote of the GOP conference.

Ryan Says Most in His Conference Want Him to Hold on to Gavel Through November
Several members have raised concerns about a protracted leadership battle to succeed speaker

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, R-Wis., announces his retirement during a press conference on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan insists he’s not giving up his gavel before November, despite a push from some members of his conference to avoid a protracted leadership battle. 

“I don’t think most members want me to do that,” the Wisconsin Republican said on “CBS This Morning.”

Ryan’s Retirement Timing Adds Complications to Leadership Battle
Midterm results will factor into GOP race dynamics

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, center, left, and Majority Whip Steve Scalise are declining to publicly say if they’re interested in succeeding Speaker Paul D. Ryan, who announced his retirement Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan’s decision to “run through the tape” and wait until the end of his term to exit Congress makes an already complicated race for his leadership position even more so.

With rumors about Ryan’s potential exit from Congress circulating for the past few months, potential successors like House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy of California and Majority Whip Steve Scalise of Louisiana had begun quietly positioning themselves for a leadership battle.

Paul Ryan Intends to Serve Out Term as Speaker, Hints at Endorsing Potential Successor
'I have more thoughts on this ... and I'll share those thoughts later,' Ryan said on who should be next speaker

The House GOP leadership team, from left, House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., Chief Deputy Whip Patrick McHenry, R-N.C., and House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., arrive for the House Republican Conference meeting in the basement of the Capitol as Speaker Paul D. Ryan announced he would not run for re-election, but would stay on as speaker until the end of the term. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Paul D. Ryan said he plans to remain speaker of the House through the end of the year when he plans to retire and indicated he will eventually endorse someone to succeed him.

“I have great confidence in this leadership team. That’s one thing that I’m really proud of,” Ryan said when asked who he thought should be the next speaker.

Republicans Mulling Budget Gambit to Avoid Spending Some Omnibus Funds
McCarthy, White House discussing rarely used impound procedure in 1974 budget law

President Donald Trump and his administration are discussing a process with House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy that could allow Republicans to rescind some funds they recently approved in the bipartisan omnibus spending bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump and congressional Republican leaders, frustrated they had to work with Democrats to pass a fiscal 2018 omnibus spending measure, are mulling a way for their party to effectively cut some of the funds they just approved. 

The idea would be to deploy lesser-used provisions of the 1974 budget law to roll back spending by impounding some of the appropriated funds.

Amodei Spins Ryan Resignation Rumor After Preaching: ‘Words Have Impact’
Nevada Republican agreed to discuss rumor on air during podcast commercial break

Nevada Rep. Mark Amodei on Monday appeared to willingly spread a rumor that Speaker Paul D. Ryan might resign in 30 to 60 days. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 1:25 p.m. | Rep. Mark Amodei, who dropped a bombshell Monday about a “rumor” that Speaker Paul D. Ryan might soon resign, knows comments like that are not made without consequence. He said so himself last week.

“I’m responsible for what I’m saying right now. Welcome to the world where words have impact,” the Nevada Republican told the Los Angeles Times in reference to a Reno high school student who used curse words when he called Amodei’s office, urging action on gun control. The school principal suspended the student after a staffer for the congressman reported the call. Amodei defended the staffer.

Omnibus Action Next Week Possible, but Obstacles Still Exist
‘For the moment we have a lot of work to do to iron these out,’ Pelosi said

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said much work remains to iron out issues on an omnibus spending bill that House GOP leaders hope to bring to the floor next week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The nearly six-month delayed fiscal 2018 omnibus spending bill could be brought to the House floor next week, but appropriators are still encountering major obstacles in drafting a bipartisan bill — even with unrelated landmines cleared. 

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy has said he would like to bring the omnibus to the floor next week, but during a week-end colloquy with House Minority Whip Steny H. Hoyer, he did not announce it as a definite part of the upcoming floor schedule. Rather, he noted action on the spending package was “possible.”

House GOP Preps Response to Florida Shooting, Democrats Want More
Absurd that Republican leaders won’t put background check bill on floor, Hoyer says

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy and Speaker Paul D. Ryan conduct a news conference in the Capitol on Tuesday after a meeting of the House Republican Conference. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Republican leaders on Tuesday announced their legislative response to a mass shooting at a Florida high school that left 17 people dead — a bill to create a federal grant program for schools to implement threat assessment protocols. But Democrats are already calling the measure insufficient. 

The House will vote next week on a bill by Florida GOP Rep. John Rutherford, called the STOP School Violence Act, Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy said.