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Glenn to Be Buried at Arlington
Ceremony begins at 9:40 a.m.

Former Sen. John Glenn, D-Ohio, died on Dec. 8. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

John Glenn, former senator, presidential candidate and astronaut, will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery in a ceremony on Thursday.

He died on Dec. 8 at 95.

Merkley Stages 15.5-Hour Anti-Gorsuch Talk-a-Thon in Senate
Merkley’s action won’t delay procedural vote on nomination, which was already set before speech

Oregon Democratic Sen. Jeff Merkley wrapped up his marathon floor speech Wednesday morning after more than 15 hours. He then gave bagels and muffins to Senate staff following the all-nighter. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Jeff Merkley staged a nearly 15½-hour long marathon speech to protest Judge Neil Gorsuch’s nomination to the Supreme Court, wrapping up at just before 10:15 Wednesday morning. 

The speech fell just a few minutes short of the seventh-longest Senate speech in the chamber’s history, which lasted 15 hours and 30 minutes. But Merkley’s action did not delay a procedural vote on Gorsuch, which was set before he began his speech.

Some GOP Lawmakers Push Back Against EPA Cuts
Decimating environmental agency could hurt — even in Trump country

President Donald Trump’s recent budget blueprint proposes eliminating roughly 3,200 positions at the EPA along with 50 programs. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images file photo)

As President Donald Trump introduces a series of budget cuts and regulatory rollbacks that would cripple the Environmental Protection Agency, he faces one unpredictable obstacle: resistance from fellow Republicans.

A small but vocal number of GOP lawmakers have rallied in support of popular programs in their districts, including clean water programs in the Great Lakes and the Chesapeake Bay, that are among the biggest losers in the budget Trump proposed to Congress last month.

It's Official: Filibuster of Neil Gorsuch Starts Nuclear Option Clock
Enough Democrats announce opposition to limiting debate

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is prepared to change Senate rules so that Republicans can do away with the filibuster for Supreme Court nominees, starting this week with Neil Gorsuch’s nomination. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Republicans will have to use the “nuclear option” to get Judge Neil Gorsuch confirmed to the Supreme Court.

The procedural maneuvering that will likely culminate in Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell moving to change the chamber’s rules is necessary because 41 members of the Democratic caucus have announced opposition to limiting debate on the Gorsuch nomination. That means they would support a filibuster and the need for 60 votes to get Gorsuch through to confirmation.

Opinion: The S.S. Trump Is Sinking — Find a Lifeboat
An open letter to House Republicans

If they're smart, House Republicans will see that being tied to President Donald Trump is a recipe for defeat next year, Allen writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Dear Republican member of the House:

Run away from Donald Trump. Run hard. Run fast. And don’t look over your shoulder.

Lawmakers Introduce Bills to Ease Tax Burdens, Criminal Penalties on Pot
Proposal comes amid continued confusion about Trump administration stance

Two of Congress’ biggest proponents of marijuana legalization redoubled their efforts Thursday with a package of bills to “pave the way” for federal regulation of the burgeoning pot industry. 

Graham, McCain Welcome Putin Foe to Congress

Russian President Vladimir Putin shakes hands with German Chancellor Angela Merkel upon his arrival to discuss the Ukrainian peace process at the Chancellery on October 19, 2016 in Berlin, Germany. (Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

The Senate’s top foes of Russian President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday used their bully pulpit to give one of his leading domestic critics a public opportunity to lambaste the leader.

Sen. Lindsey Graham, who leads the Appropriations subcommittee on foreign aid, held the second hearing in a month on the need to boost spending for Eurasian democracy assistance and invited his longtime ally, Armed Services Chairman John McCain to introduce one of the witnesses, a Russian dissident who has twice nearly died from alleged poisoning.

Senate Needs All Hands, Including Vice President, on Measure to Restrict Health Funds
Johnny Isakson, Mike Pence allow Senate to consider joint resolution

Vice President Mike Pence was needed to break a tie just so the Senate could consider a joint resolution that could slow funding to Planned Parenthood. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Senate needed a senator just returning from back surgery and the vice president to break a tie just to proceed to a measure that would allow states to restrict funding to health care providers that provide abortion.

With Republicans Lisa Murkowski of Alaska and Susan Collins of Maine voting against proceeding to the joint resolution, the chamber had to wait for Georgia Republican Johnny Isakson to return to the floor with the aid of a walker just to get to 50-50.

Opinion: Not So Fast, Democrats. You Had a Good Day, but Now What?
Party needs to focus on a clear message

Democratic leaders such as Charles E. Schumer and Nancy Pelosi may be celebrating the GOP’s recent health care debacle, but they need to focus on making sure that Americans know what they stand for, Curtis writes. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

As the Republican Party has learned, it’s much easier to be the party of “no” than to actually have a plan to lead. So while Democrats are celebrating a GOP in disarray, the party out of power needs a message and a plan.

Understandably, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosicelebrated as the GOP’s new-and-improved health care plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act failed. But long term, she must truly want to experience a return to the speaker’s post. Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer knows just how to rile Donald Trump, his fellow New Yorker. But he still has to call Trump Mr. President.

Senate Intelligence Leaders Stress Bipartisanship in Russia Probe
Burr admits he voted for Trump, but emphasizes how big the moment is

Senate Intelligence Chairman Richard M. Burr and Vice Chairman Mark Warner hold a news conference Wednesday to provide an update on the panel’s investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 election. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Last week’s Supreme Court nomination hearings for Judge Neil Gorsuch likely weren't the most interesting Senate business on the second floor of the Hart Office Building.

That’s where the Senate Intelligence Committee conducts its meetings in a secure facility just around the corner from where the Judiciary Committee was meeting.