Presidential Inauguration 2017

11 Memorable Moments as Trump Touts DeSantis, Scott in Florida
President again fixates on crowd size, 2016 election win

President Donald Trump waves as he leaves a rally in Tampa, Fla., on Tuesday. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

ANALYSIS — President Donald Trump showed again Tuesday evening why he is as much the disruptor in chief as he is the commander in chief, jetting to Florida to weigh in on the Sunshine State’s Republican gubernatorial primary.

Trump called the candidate he has endorsed, Rep. Ron DeSantis, onstage early at a rally in Tampa, even branding him with a compliment he reserves for a select few — a “tough cookie.” Presidents typically have avoided getting involved in primaries for state and and congressional races. But not Trump, who is eager to put candidates who share his nationalist and conservative bona fides into elected office at all levels.

Trump Sheds Bipartisan Tone, Returns to Blasting Dems
Presidents joins Republicans at retreat to talk DACA, infrastructure

President Donald Trump delivers his State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress in the House chamber on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

It turns out the bipartisan message President Donald Trump struck in his State of the Union address had a shelf life of exactly 32 hours.

The president used part of his speech to a joint session of Congress to call on Republicans and Democrats to cooperate on issues like immigration reform and rebuilding the country’s aging infrastructure. He stuck to that script on Wednesday, taking no public shots at congressional Democrats even after they booed and hissed at parts of his address.

Women’s March Will Go On, Shutdown or Not
National Park Service has a contingency plan if it comes to that

Protesters march down Independence Avenue in Washington during the Women's March on Washington the day after Inauguration Day last year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The 2018 Women’s March in Washington will move forward as planned on Saturday despite a looming government shutdown.

An estimated 5,500 marchers will gather at the Lincoln Memorial Reflecting Pool at 11 a.m. for a series of speeches before winding their way east down Constitution Avenue and north to the White House gates to advocate for women’s inclusion in the political process.

Kelly’s Civil War Comment Leads White House Off Message — Again
Asked four times if White House thinks slavery was ‘wrong,’ Sanders silent

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly’s comment about the Civil War in a television interview Monday night started a slide off message — despite his staff’s plans for a day about tax reform and the president’s coming Asia trip. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

White House officials attempted to move beyond the legal troubles of three former Trump campaign aides, pushing a message that President Donald Trump was busily preparing for his Asia trip and meeting with lawmakers on his agenda. Then, again, came self-inflicted errors.

Trump’s staff set up his day to steer the narrative toward that coming 11-day trek through a handful of Asian countries — with the North Korea threat and trade issues on the agenda — and the Republican push for a tax overhaul bill.

Kislyak Leaves His Post With Russiagate in His Wake
Russian ambassador’s communications with Trump advisers at center of investigations

Russian Ambassador to the United States Sergey Kislyak leaves after a farewell reception in Washington on July 11 hosted by the U.S.-Russia Business Council. (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

Sergei Kislyak, the Russian ambassador to Washington who was in contact with multiple U.S. officials in Donald Trump’s administration during the 2016 presidential campaign and the lead-up to Trump’s inauguration, left his post over the weekend, the Russian embassy announced in a Saturday morning tweet.

Kislyak was replaced in the interim by Minister-Counseler and Deputy Chief of Mission Denis V. Gonchar until his successor arrives from Moscow.

Trump Ready for Summer Sojourn in France
President accepts Macron’s Bastille Day celebration invitation

President Donald Trump will visit France next month for Bastille Day. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Trump White House issued an unlikely message Wednesday: Viva la France!

It turns out Donald Trump, the “America first” president who regularly rankles the United States’ European allies, will visit President Emmanuel Macron’s France before Prime Minister Theresa May’s United Kingdom.

Return of the Inauguration Crowd Size Matter
Unnamed complainant alleges Park Service mishandled photos

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer makes a statement to members of the media at a White House briefing on Jan. 21. (Alex Wong/Getty Images file photo)

A new Interior Department inspector general report is further muddying the already murky situation surrounding White House claims that the crowd at President Donald Trump’s inauguration was the largest in American history.

The report found “no evidence to substantiate” complaints that National Park Service employees altered records related to crowd-size estimates for Trump’s Jan. 20 inauguration. The IG also investigated and found no evidence to support the unnamed complainant’s allegation that a Park Service employee mishandled photos of the event and posted political comments on Facebook.

Celebrating Black History Month With Added Resonance
Obama retirement, record number of black lawmakers mark 2017

Former President Barack Obama's departure from the East Front of the Capitol on Jan. 20 was a bittersweet moment for African-American members of Congress. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Black History Month this year has taken on an added resonance, reflected in the record number of African-Americans in Congress.

In the Senate, it has been a long buildup to the current high-water mark of three members: Republican Tim Scott of South Carolina and Democrats Cory Booker of New Jersey and Kamala Harris of California. 

Capitol’s Top Cops Prepare for Joint Session
Sergeants-at-arms pivot quickly from inauguration

Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Frank J. Larkin greets President Donald Trump after his swearing-in as the 45th president of the United States on Jan. 20 as Missouri Sen. Roy Blunt and Vice President Mike Pence look on. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Capitol’s top law enforcement officers are applying what they learned from this month’s presidential inauguration to prepare for Capitol Hill’s next big event — President Donald Trump’s address to a joint session of Congress — in a city that has been wracked by protests ever since Trump was sworn in. 

“We’re readjusting our vector to that,” Senate Sergeant-at-Arms Frank J. Larkin told Roll Call. “Each of these events builds on each other.”

Ryan Invites Trump to Address Joint Session of Congress Next Month
House speaker describes new president's agenda as 'ambitious'

Speaker of the House Rep. Paul Ryan and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell watch President Donald Trump deliver his inaugural address on Friday. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan has invited President Donald Trump to address a joint session of Congress late next month, giving the 45th chief executive another opportunity to deliver his vision for governing the country.

Ryan used Trump’s preferred communication tool, Twitter, to announce he has invited Trump to address lawmakers on Feb. 28.

Word on the Hill: March for Life Planning
School Choice Week rally

Last year’s March for Life went ahead as planned despite blizzard warnings issued for the D.C. area. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The annual anti-abortion rally in Washington, the March for Life, is this Friday.

While everyone was preparing for President Donald Trump’s inauguration, march organizers released its list of speakers, which includes counselor to the president Kellyanne Conway, the highest-ranking White House official to ever address the event in person. Also scheduled to speak are Sen. Joni Ernst, R-Iowa, Rep. Mia Love, R-Utah, and Rep. Christopher H. Smith, R-N.J.

Trump Executive Actions Put Leaders on the Spot
In twist, Democrats cheer TPP-killing move as Republicans squirm

Donald Trump greets President Barack Obama moments before Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States on Friday. Three days later, Trump set up conflicts with his own party’s leaders by killing Obama’s Asian trade pact. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Donald Trump began unraveling major parts of his predecessor’s legacy on Monday, but some of his first proclamations and actions as president immediately put him at odds with his own party’s congressional leaders.

The new president mingled Monday evening with Republican and Democratic leaders in the White House’s ornate State Dining Room, the kind of social event Barack Obama rarely hosted at the executive mansion.

Message from Charlotte: Revolution Starts at Home
Local women’s march a reminder of how past divisions were resolved in ways no one could have imagined

Left to right: Tommy and Debbie George marched at the Women’s March in Charlotte, N.C., with their friend Mary Lou Buck. (Mary C. Curtis/CQ Roll Call)

CHARLOTTE, N.C. — In this very blue city, in a state that went red for Donald Trump while sending a Democratic governor to the statehouse, a crowd estimated at more than 10,000 filled the streets at Saturday’s Women’s March. It was one of many across the country, sending a message that the story of Election 2016, far from being over, is just beginning.

The winding route took marchers — more than double in number than expected — past signposts of a region that has seen its share of divisions, but has made steady if shaky progress.

Trump and Schumer Begin the Battle of New York
Trent Lott sees similarities to his relationship with Clinton

Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th president of the United States by Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. on the West Front of the Capitol as his family looks on. His relationship with Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer will go a long way toward determining how much Congress can get done. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

New Yorkers pride themselves on being brash and tough, and that was obvious in the give and take on Inauguration Day between the newly minted 45th president of the United States, Donald Trump, and his chief antagonist, Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer.

And for at least one former Senate opposition leader, the back and forth between the two all seems quite familiar, and a good harbinger.

Statuary Lunch Hall a Model of Make-Nice Decorum
After fiery campaign and inaugural speech

A U.S. Capitol Police officer takes a photo as a Marine helicopter carrying former President Barack Obama and former First Lady Michelle Obama lifts off from the East Plaza of the U.S. Capitol following the swearing in of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

After former President Barack Obama took off on a military chopper from the East Front of the Capitol, President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence joined congressional leaders and other dignitaries for one of Inauguration Day’s more intimate moments, far from the crowds.

At the traditional luncheon in Statuary Hall honoring the new president, attendees at the event — one of the hottest tickets in town — feasted on lobster and steak, with pairings of California wines.