impeachment

Photos of the Week: They’re Back!
The week of September 13 as captured by Roll Call’s photojournalists

Over the August recess, the Ohio Clock’s two arms were returned to full working order. Meanwhile, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., returned to Washington with just one working arm after breaking his shoulder at his home in Kentucky. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Judiciary ranking member Doug Collins compares committee’s work to an Instagram filter

Ranking member Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga., speaks at a House Judiciary Committee hearing in July 2019. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Pelosi on Trump investigations: ‘We are, from a timing standpoint, where we need to be’
Speaker still refuses to clarify whether she thinks it’s appropriate to call the investigations an impeachment inquiry

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., won’t call Democrats’ investigations into President Donald Trump an impeachment inquiry, but says timing-wise they're where they need to be. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Thursday again declined to say whether she thinks House Democrats’ investigations into President Donald Trump are a formal impeachment inquiry, but she said the probe is proceeding on track. 

“I’m very pleased [with] the path we’re on and the progress we’ve made,” the California Democrat said. “We are, from a timing standpoint, where we need to be.”

Capitol Ink | Mixed Messages

Hoyer contradicts Judiciary Committee on impeachment inquiry

House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer, D-Md., contradicted Democrats on the Judiciary Committee when he said Wednesday the panel was not engaged in an impeachment inquiry. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 1:23 p.m. | House Majority Leader Steny H. Hoyer on Wednesday directly contradicted Judiciary Committee Democrats’ assertion that they’re engaged in an impeachment inquiry.

“No,” the Maryland Democrat told reporters during his weekly press briefing when asked if he thought an impeachment inquiry was underway. “I think the delineation ought to be whether or not they’re considering a resolution of impeachment.”

Democrats still not working off same playbook on impeachment
Mixed messages abound about whether Judiciary is in an impeachment inquiry and where it’s headed

House Judiciary member David Ciccilline says Thursday’s resolution aims to identify what the Democrats are doing and will give “some additional authority to the chairman and to counsel.” (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats are struggling to speak with one voice about impeachment, as members returned to Washington this week with mixed messages about whether the Judiciary Committee is already engaged in an impeachment inquiry and where that investigation is headed. 

Judiciary Democrats almost uniformly agree that their panel’s expanding investigation into President Donald Trump’s alleged crimes and abuse of power is an impeachment inquiry. Any disagreement about that definition that may exist among those two dozen members will likely be brought to light Thursday as the committee marks up a resolution defining procedures for its investigation.

Trump says he’s preparing report on his personal finances
House Judiciary mentions president’s finances in announcing move toward impeachment articles

President Donald Trump greets Blake Marnell of San Diego, during a rally at the Williamsport Regional Airport in Montoursville, Pa., on May 20. He spoke to reporters Monday as he left the White House for another rally, this one in North Carolina. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump said Monday he soon will release a report detailing his personal finances and declared secret talks he launched with Taliban leaders are “dead.”

“As far as I’m concerned they’re dead,” he said on the White House’s South Lawn as he departed for a campaign rally in 2020 battleground North Carolina. “They thought they had to kill people to put themselves a little bit better negotiating position. And when they did, they killed 12 people. One happened to be a great American soldier. … You can’t do that with me.”

Capitol Ink | Capitol Hell

Democrats launch investigation into Pence’s stay at Trump Hotel in Ireland, Trump’s G7 plans
House Judiciary and Oversight panels probing whether Pence’s stay at Trump resort in Ireland and potential G7 summit at Trump Doral would be emoluments violations

Vice President Mike Pence and Taoiseach Leo Varadkar depart after holding a news conference at Farmleigh House in Dublin, Ireland, on Tuesday. House Democrats are investigating whether President Donald Trump, Pence and others violated the emoluments clause of the Constitution for Pence staying at Trump’s property in Ireland. (Charles McQuillan/Getty Images)

Two House committees are investigating President Donald Trump, Vice President Mike Pence, and other administration officials for possibly violating the Constitution's emoluments clause when Pence stayed at Trump's golf resort in Ireland.

The Democratic lawmakers are also probing whether Trump's continued promotion of a possible G7 summit location next year at his Trump National Doral resort near Miami would violate the emoluments clause.

Should we all just throw away our impeachment position trackers?
Tracking support for an impeachment inquiry no longer relevant since Judiciary panel claims one’s underway

Protesters gather in front of the White House for a rally and candlelight vigil on July 18, 2018. The protest was one of more than 100 events around the country following a dozen indictments in special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s Russia probe. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

ANALYSIS — Several news outlets, including CQ Roll Call, have kept tallies of the House Democrats who have called for impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump for months. It may be time to throw them out.

The media lists of Democrats who support an impeachment inquiry — counts vary slightly by news outlet — are effectively meaningless now that Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler and other senior Democrats say his panel’s investigation into Trump’s alleged misdeeds is equivalent to one.