impeachment

Subpoena for Bolton’s unpublished book would likely face fierce resistance
Intellectual property rights among issues that could entangle legislative branch, publisher

The forthcoming book by former national security adviser John Bolton could lead to a protracted fight if it is subpoenaed in President Donald Trump’s impeachment trial. (Win McNamee/Getty Images file photo)

Congress could subpoena the manuscript of former national security adviser John Bolton’s forthcoming book on his time in the White House, but such a move could raise concerns about intellectual property rights and lead to a fight between lawmakers and Bolton and his publishers.

“Either [chamber] of Congress has the ability to subpoena records, including unpublished manuscripts,” said Chris Armstrong, the former chief oversight counsel for the Senate Finance Committee.

Impeachment news roundup: Jan. 28
Trump’s defense continues as Bolton book drops more bombshells

Republican Sen. Susan Collins arrives to the Capitol for the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on Monday. Collins is among those GOP senators Democrats are hoping will vote to hear more witnesses and subpoena documents. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

File updated 11:36 a.m.

President Donald Trump’s defense team will conclude its arguments in his impeachment trial today as Democrats push their Republican counterparts to hear more witnesses that the White House barred from testifying in the House.

The Bolton bombshell and the moral lessons of Watergate
Republicans would be wise to ponder the examples of the late Egil Krogh and Tom Railsback

Republicans would be wise to ponder the examples of two Watergate figures who died recently, Tom Railsback, left, and Egil Krogh, Shapiro writes. (CQ Roll Call file photo/Courtesy Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum)

OPINION — The John Bolton book bombshell represents the intersection of mendacity and greed.

The mendacity has been the dissembling and the lying by Donald Trump and his Republican enablers that the withholding of assistance to Ukraine was anything other than an old-fashioned mob shakedown: “You have a nice $400 million military aid package here. It would be a shame if anything should happen to it.”

With Iowa and New Hampshire still up in the air, Democratic race has 2016 echoes
Once impeachment is done, Democrats will have to deal with their divisions

Senators raise their hands as Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. administers the oath of the Senate Court of Impeachment Thursday. (Screenshot/Senate Recording Studio)

ANALYSIS — Sometime soon, the impeachment trial of Donald John Trump will likely end and the Senate, notwithstanding who might get called as a witness, will acquit him.

The president, of course, will claim victory and, having escaped punishment, will presumably return to doing what he has been doing for months — looking for ways to discredit Democrats, even if it involves help from foreign governments. The rest of us will also jump quickly from impeachment and back to the presidential race, hardly missing a beat.

Capitol Ink | Mustache Justice

View from the gallery: Senators’ personal habits on full display as week 2 begins
One senator picked his nose, while an attorney swiped a souvenir

Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W. Va., walks to the Senate chamber for the start of the impeachment trial proceedings Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Tennessee Republican Lamar Alexander fought off sleep as President Donald Trump’s legal team discussed a history of subpoena litigation, eyes closed, his cheek resting on his hand, his chin sometimes dropping toward his orange sweater.

When Deputy White House counsel Patrick Philbin announced he was ready to wrap up his portion of Trump’s presentation, Alexander studied his watch.

Dershowitz argues Trump cannot be convicted without a criminal offense
President’s legal team focuses heavily on Bidens in Day 5 of impeachment trial

An iPhone playing the House impeachment managers’ news conference Monday sits on the floor of the Senate Reception Room before the start of the trial proceedings. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Alan Dershowitz, former Harvard Law School professor and controversial defense attorney, made his debut in the Senate impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on Monday with a deep history lesson and argument that the president cannot be convicted without an actual criminal offense.

Trump’s defense team teased Dershowitz’s arguments more than once throughout the day, like the evening news promotes its big story. And it was not an accident that the star consultant on the Trump defense team landed in primetime.

John Bolton shows that in Washington, irony never dies
No role reversal, it turns out, is too extreme

Former National Security Adviser John Bolton (Getty Images)

The emergence of John Bolton as a potentially critical witness in Democrats’ case for ousting President Donald Trump from office is deeply ironic.

For years, Democrats almost to a person have depicted the former national security adviser and arch-conservative as practically unhinged. Now, by contrast, Democrats consider him a solid and stable foundation upon which to rest their case for the president’s conviction in his ongoing impeachment trial. 

Impeachment news roundup: Jan. 27
Pence spokesman says Trump never tied Ukraine aid to Biden investigation with VP

Vice President Mike Pence leaves the Old Senate Chamber after conducting the ceremonial swear-in of senators in January 2019. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

File updated 9:06 p.m.

At least two Republican senators indicated Monday that they and others are inclined to call for the testimony of former national security adviser John Bolton after reports that he says in his upcoming book that President Donald Trump told him to withhold aid to Ukraine absent an investigation into political rivals.

View from the gallery: Hardly enough time to fidget
Rare Senate weekend session only lasts two hours

Tennessee Sen. Lamar Alexander arrives at the Capitol on Saturday for the continuation of the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

It’s a Saturday, but nearly all the senators were in their workday suits and ties. The Kentucky delegation was one exception, with both Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Rand Paul wearing khakis and blazers.

This was the fifth straight day in the Senate chamber of the third presidential impeachment trial in U.S. history, and the 100 senators appeared for just two hours during a brief and rare weekend session when President Donald Trump’s team started its opening presentation.