elections

Tester, Rosendale Neck and Neck in Latest Montana Poll
Incumbent holds 3 point lead within error margin

Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., walks to the Senate Democrats' policy lunch in the Capitol via the Senate subway tunnel Tuesday, Sept. 25, 2018. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Just two weeks before the midterm elections on Nov. 6, Montana Democratic Sen. Jon Tester held a 3-point advantage over his Republican challenger in a new poll released by the Montana Television Network and Montana State University.

Tester, seeking a third term, led state auditor Matt Rosendale, 46 percent to 43 percent in the survey of registered voters. That’s within the margin of error of plus or minus 2 percentage points for the poll conducted by mail of more than 2,000 registered voters from late September through early October.

‘Unprecedented’ Gender Gap Found Ahead of Midterms in Wisconsin Poll
Study suggests Democrats should look to turn out women in November

Sen. Tammy Baldwin, D-Wis., speaks with reporters in the Capitol after the Senate vote to reopen the government in January 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump’s approval rating among men has climbed to an all-time high in Wisconsin at 59 percent, while his approval among women in the state stands at a paltry 39 percent, according to a new poll.

The gap is reportedly the largest in the history of Marquette Law Schools’ polling and suggests Democrats should look to turn out women in November.

House Midterm Outlook: Look for a Democratic Flip
Two weeks out, all signs still point to Democrats taking the House

Former Vice President Joe Biden appears with Nevada Democratic congressional and state candidates in Las Vegas on Saturday for an early vote rally at the Culinary Workers Union Local 226. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS — Are we still headed for a Democratic wave in the House next month? That all depends on how you define a wave. But one thing is clear: Democrats are still likely to flip the chamber even after all the buzz about a post-Kavanaugh Republican bounce.

A wave occurs when a large number of one party’s seats flip to the other party, invariably because of a national political figure (the president, usually) or a national issue. Many competitive seats change hands, and at least a few entrenched incumbents suddenly find themselves in trouble.

Can New Jersey’s Leonard Lance Survive a Democratic Wave?
GOP lawmaker faces tough re-election against Democrat Tom Malinowski

Rep. Leonard Lance, R-N.J., voted against the GOP health care plan on the floor last year, but Democrats are still attacking him for voting for it in committee. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

LEDGEWOOD, N.J. — Nobody dislikes New Jersey Rep. Leonard Lance

The moderate Republican voted against what were supposed to be his party’s major legislative achievements this Congress: the tax overhaul and the repeal of the 2010 health care law. And unlike many of his GOP peers, he’s actually held town hall meetings. His civility and the carefulness with which he chooses his words hark back to a different political era.

Speaker Pelosi? Maybe. Tea Party Redux? Not if She Can Help It
California Democrat won’t face the same problems Boehner did eight years ago

As speaker, Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., is likely to lead a Democratic Caucus that is smaller than the Republican majority of 2010 and with fewer ideologues, Murphy writes. (Sarah Silbiger/CQ Roll Call file photo)

OPINION — I’m not sure anyone enjoyed John Boehner’s speakership as much as I did covering him and his new majority in 2011 and 2012. What more can you ask for in a storyline than a merlot-loving congressional institutionalist who wins the speaker’s gavel on the wings of a pack of angry rebels?

Fast forward eight years to the Trump-fueled anger on the progressive left, along with projections that Democrats will more than likely win back the House, and you have to wonder if it’s time for Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi to switch from chocolate to cigarettes to gird herself for life leading a pack of would-be insurrectionists as Boehner had to do in 2011.

Are Democrats Giving Up on Ohio’s 1st District?
Pureval’s campaign has struggled after reports of spending irregularity

Republicans say a lapse in Democratic spending in Ohio’s 1st District bodes well for GOP incumbent Steve Chabot.  (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Democrat Aftab Pureval captured national attention this summer as a rising star with a shot at unseating longtime Republican Rep. Steve Chabot in Ohio’s 1st District. But questions about irregularities in his campaign spending set off a flurry of GOP attacks that may have dented expectations.

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee’s last ad in the Cincinnati-area district expired Monday and other major groups are not active there, said Bob Kish, a consultant for Republican candidates who has access to reports of spending totals that are not publicly available. 

Democrats Seize on Trump Administration’s Latest Obamacare Move
New administration proposal will lead to more ‘junk’ health plans, minority party says

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer says Republicans “are once again undermining protections for people with pre-existing conditions.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Democrats have seized on a Trump administration proposal to loosen restrictions on some health insurance offerings as the latest way to attack Republicans over protecting people with pre-existing conditions.

“The American people should look at what Republicans are doing, rather than what they’re saying, when it comes to health care. Just weeks before the election, Republicans are once again undermining protections for people with pre-existing conditions and sabotaging our health care system,” Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer said in a statement.

GOP Congressman Floats Passing Border Wall Funding Through Budget Reconciliation
Process would allow for simple-majority vote in the Senate, but both chambers would need to pass a budget first

Rep. Bradley Byrne, R-Ala., says his legislation aims to prevent Democrats from continuing to “block our efforts to build a wall along our southern border.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Alabama Republican Rep. Bradley Byrne announced Monday that he has introduced legislation to use the budget reconciliation process to provide for up to $25 billion for President Donald Trump to construct his border wall before the end of his first term.

The bill, co-sponsored by 15 House Republicans, would allow the GOP to pass wall funding with a simple-majority vote in the Senate by using the reconciliation process — if the measure can withstand a “Byrd bath,” the scrubbing of the bill for violations of the Senate’s reconciliation rules. 

Scenes From Early Voting in Nevada
Nevada Democrats make a big push for the crucial early vote

Supporters of Rep. Jacky Rosen, the Democratic Senate nominee in Nevada, wave signs Friday outside KLAS-TV in Las Vegas before the debate between Rosen and GOP Sen. Dean Heller. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Nevada, where early voting began Saturday, is the scene of one of the most contested Senate races this cycle — the only one where a Republican incumbent is defending a seat in a state that Hillary Clinton won in 2016.

Democrats in the Silver State are working hard to on the Latino vote — bolstered by an energetic get-out-the-early-vote effort from the powerful Culinary Worker Union Local 226.

Pelosi Suggests 2020 Outcome Will Help Her Decide Whether to Stay in Congress
Democratic leader was prepared to retire if Clinton won in 2016, stayed on because of Trump

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., suggested Monday that the outcome of the 2020 presidential election will factor into her decision on how long to stay in Congress. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, who hopes to be speaker next year if Democrats win a chamber majority, suggested Monday that the outcome of the 2020 presidential election would factor into her decision on how long to stay in Congress. 

The 78-year-old California Democrat has long signaled that she sees her congressional career coming to an end in the not-so-distant future.