conservatives

Amid Mounting Criticism, Administration Digs In Over Migrant Separation Policy
'Congress can fix this tomorrow,' DHS secretary says as GOP complaints pile up

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen is defending the administration's policies at the southern border, despite an ever-widening swath of criticism. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Facing an ever-widening swath of criticism, including from senior Republicans, Trump administration officials dug in Monday on their decision to separate migrant parents and children at the U.S.-Mexico border, signaling they will only end the practice if lawmakers pass immigration legislation.

“Congress and the courts created this problem, and Congress alone can fix it,” Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said during a contentious press briefing at the White House. “Until then, we will enforce every law we have on the books to defend the sovereignty and the security of the United States.”

Trump Warns U.S. Could Follow Path of Germany on Immigration
President wants to meet with members of both parties on matter, spokesman says

President Donald Trump on Monday used Germany's immigration problems to defend his own hardline policies. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 10:05 a.m. President Donald Trump on Monday appeared to defend his administration’s policy of separating migrant families by warning that Germany’s and Europe’s immigration issues could be replicated here.

He used several tweets Monday morning to blast not only German and European immigration laws, but also Democratic lawmakers. The GOP president claimed anew that the opposition party is withholding the votes needed to pass a sweeping immigration overhaul measure that would address a list of unresolved matters.

How Donald Trump Shivved a Compromise GOP Immigration Bill
Aides were caught unaware by president's announcement

President Donald Trump greets mostly Republican members after addressing a joint session of Congress last year. On Friday, he appeared to end hopes a compromise immigration bill the conference hammered out would make it to the floor. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated 3:03 p.m. Senior White House officials worked with House Republicans for weeks on a compromise immigration measure, but were careful to avoid saying anything publicly that would sink the measure. That changed Friday morning when President Donald Trump walked out to the White House’s North Lawn.

House Republicans reached agreement on a sweeping immigration overhaul measure after conservatives, moderates and leaders negotiated behind closed doors for weeks — with White House legislative affairs director Marc Short also involved. Members said Thursday they had reached a deal to vote on two measures: a measure favored by conservatives and a compromise version in which all sides gave some ground.

GOP Seeks Changes to Immigration Deal They Crafted
Compromise would help Dreamers, fund border wall, curb family-based visa programs

People protest outside the Capitol on Jan. 21 to call for the passage of the so-called DREAM Act. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A compromise immigration deal brokered by House Republicans this week would offer so-called Dreamers a path to citizenship, provide nearly $25 billion for President Donald Trump’s border wall and end family-based visa programs for certain relatives of U.S. citizens, according to a discussion draft of legislation circulated among lawmakers Thursday.

The discussion draft, provided to Roll Call by a staffer with knowledge of the negotiations, would create a new merit-based visa that Dreamers and other young immigrants could obtain starting six years after the bill is enacted. The visa would be available to Dreamers enrolled in the expiring Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, known as DACA, as well as those who are eligible but never signed up.

At the Races: He’s Off the Trail
Our weekly newsletter on congressional campaigns

Welcome to At the Races! You can keep track of House and Senate races with this weekly newsletter by subscribing here. We want to hear what you think. Email us at attheraces@cqrollcall.com with your questions, tips or candidate sightings. —Simone Pathé and Bridget Bowman

How Mark Sanford Proudly Failed His Loyalty Test
No regrets from second House Republican ousted by someone claiming stronger Trump allegiance

Rep. Mark Sanford, R-S.C., spent heavily but lost narrowly Tuesday in the Republican primary in South Carolina’s coastal low country to a state legislator who aligned closely with President Donald Trump. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Today’s Congress deserves its reputation for uniformity in the ranks. Gender and ethnicity aside, the place is overrun with members priding themselves on their message discipline, policymaking tunnel vision and personal lives scrubbed and shielded from public view. And for the Republicans, of course, unflinching loyalty to President Donald Trump is now the core of the homogenized brand.

So is Hill survival even possible anymore for a member capable of thoughtful departures from his partisan talking points, open to ideological subtlety, with a home life that’s been a national melodrama — and who on top of all that has called out the president on more than one occasion?

Trump Gloats Over Sanford Loss, Puts Kaine On Notice
President declares there is ‘no longer a Nuclear Threat from North Korea’

President Donald Trump answers questions during a news conference on Tuesday following his meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un in Singapore. (Win McNamee/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump roared back into Washington Wednesday morning in fitting fashion: with a tweetstorm mocking GOP Rep. Mark Sanford and lashing out at Democratic Sen. Tim Kaine.

Those social media posts followed others during his lengthy journey from Singapore in which he continued to lavish praise on North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

South Carolina’s Mark Sanford Falls in GOP Primary
Frequent Trump critic becomes second incumbent to lose this year

South Carolina Rep. Mark Sanford lost his primary Tuesday night. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

South Carolina Rep. Mark Sanford on Tuesday became the second incumbent of the year to fall in a Republican primary, losing to a challenger who questioned his loyalty to President Donald Trump.

With 99 percent of precincts reporting, state Rep. Katie Arrington was leading Sanford 51 percent to 47 percent when The Associated Press called the race.

Republican Corey Stewart Will Challenge Sen. Tim Kaine in Virginia
Former gubernatorial hopeful narrowly wins the three-way Senate primary

Virginia Sen. Tim Kaine is running for a second Senate term this year. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Corey Stewart won the Republican nomination for Senate in Virginia on Tuesday night, setting up a long-shot contest against Democratic incumbent Tim Kaine.

With 98 percent of precincts reporting, Stewart, the chairman of the Prince William County Board of Supervisors, led a three-way GOP field with 45 percent of the vote when The Associated Press called the race. State Del. Nick Freitas was in second with 43 percent. 

New Court Documents Reveal Details of Yard Dispute That Hospitalized Rand Paul
Kentucky senator repeatedly stacked branches by property line, angering neighbor

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., broke six ribs in an altercation with his neighbor last November. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated 2:55 p.m. | New court documents in Kentucky shed more light on details from the yard dispute that landed Sen. Rand Paul in the hospital with six broken ribs, among other thoracic complications, and could land his neighbor in prison.

Rene Boucher, 60, didn’t like where his neighbor of 17 years, Paul, was putting his yard debris.