congressional-affairs

Zuckerberg to face criticism over cryptocurrency, other issues
Democrats and Republicans will interrogate the Facebook CEO on Wednesday over a number of issues

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is expected to face bipartisan criticism Wednesday when he appears before the House Financial Services Committee. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A conciliatory-sounding Mark Zuckerberg will face questions Wednesday about Facebook’s world-altering ambitions from congressional critics of both parties.

Democrats and Republicans are expected to interrogate the Facebook CEO over the plan to launch Libra, a cryptocurrency pegged to a basket of global currencies and managed by a consortium of multinational corporations, as well as the company’s role in the spread of political propaganda, alleged violations of housing legislation, dominance of online advertising, monetization of users’ data and censoring of right-wing media.

Trump ‘lynching’ tweet just latest impeachment myth — from both sides
Inquiry has featured misleading statements thrust into ether by GOP and Dems, muddying probe

President Donald Trump speaks to members of the media on the South Lawn of the White House on Oct. 10. His comparison of the ongoing impeachment inquiry to a "lynching" drew bipartisan criticism. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS — President Donald Trump’s comparison of his possible impeachment as a “lynching” set off a war of words Tuesday between his staunchest defenders and his fiercest critics. Accusations have flown back and forth during the nearly month-old inquiry, but they have not always rung accurate — or been even remotely true.

Trump’s “lynching” tweet is a prime example of the latter, with even some of his political allies making a rare break with a president who still has the support, according to multiple polls, of nearly 90 percent of Republican voters. But both sides have been guilty of pushing myths about how this impeachment is playing out and the nature of the constitutionally based process.

Capitol Ink | Rallying the troops

‘That’s not believable’ — Cardin has heated exchange with administration official

Then the U.S. Ambassador to Iraq, James Jeffrey testifies at a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing. (Bill Clark/Roll Call File Photo)

James Jeffrey, the Trump administration’s special envoy for Syria and countering the Islamic State, called President Trump’s decision two weeks ago to abruptly remove U.S. troops in northern Syria a “tragic situation,” but added that after a five-day ceasefire, “we’re in a better place now than we were a week ago.”

‘We have been scorned’: Democratic Women’s Caucus lays out agenda
U.S. maternal mortality rate is a top concern

Massachusetts Rep. Ayanna S. Pressley had a few choice words to share at a Tuesday event for the Democratic Women’s Caucus. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

“Hell hath no fury like a woman scorned — well, we have been scorned,” Massachusetts Rep. Ayanna S. Pressley said Tuesday, lending a little sass to  the Democratic Women’s Caucus news conference to roll out its policy agenda.

Formally launched this spring, the caucus laid out plans for the 116th Congress that focus on economic opportunity, safety and freedom from violence, equality, access to health care, supporting women in the military and veterans, and empowering women across the globe.

Accusing critics of a ‘lynching’ not just a Trump thing
Many who’ve used the term are descendants of slaves and free blacks

President Donald Trump isn’t the only public figure to accuse critics of participating in a “lynching.” (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump’s description of his impeachment travails as a “lynching” is by no means the first time a public figure has used that term to attack critics.

But there’s one thing Trump, a self-described billionaire who’s spoken repeatedly — if not always accurately — about his European roots, does not have in common with many who have resorted to the political lynching defense. His ancestors were neither slaves nor descended from free blacks, historically the most frequent targets of mob violence and extrajudicial hangings.

Facebook posts biggest quarterly lobby tab, as business, health interests dominate K Street
Impeachment is not slowing down lobbying efforts

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testifies before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in 2018. Facebook spent a record amount on lobbying this year. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Facebook is on pace to spend more on federal lobbying this year than ever before, according to public disclosures out this week, as the social media giant’s CEO prepares to testify Wednesday on Capitol Hill.

The company — at the center of debates over the spread of false information, data privacy and others — spent $12.3 million to lobby the federal government in the first nine months of the year. In 2018, Facebook shelled out $12.6 million for 12 months of lobbying.

Shrinking congressional districts look for federal help
Some districts may have lost 30,000 or more people through 2018

Flint, Mich., residents Virginia Mitchell, right, and her daughter-in-law, Tiara Williams, pictured in 2016 during the city’s lead contamination crisis. Flint is among communities that have lost population since 2010 and are seeking more federal dollars. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Despite explosive growth in other areas of the country since 2010, about 80 congressional districts have lost significant population over the decade — leaving many looking for help from the federal government. 

Some districts may have lost 30,000 or more people through 2018, many of them in manufacturing and mining areas in the Northeast, according to Census Bureau data released last month. Most of those districts are represented by Democrats but located in states President Donald Trump won in 2016 by promising new trade deals that have since taken a back seat in Washington.

Elise Stefanik: Schiff ‘unfit’ to chair Intelligence Committee

Rep. Elise Stefanik, R-N.Y., calls lack of transparency in the impeachment inquiry "unprecedented." (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Intelligence Committee member Elise Stefanik called limitations on access to impeachment inquiry transcripts for committee members “unprecedented.”

The New York Republican said Intel members were notified this week that the panels would print only one copy of a transcript for every member of Congress to view.

Impeachment news roundup: Oct. 22
Trump suggests impeachment effort will hurt Democrats, diplomat who questioned holding up Ukraine deal testifies

Bill Taylor, center, acting U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, arrives at the Capitol on Tuesday for a deposition in the House's impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Acting U.S. ambassador to Ukraine Bill Taylor told House impeachment investigators on Tuesday about President Donald Trump’s alleged efforts to coerce the new Ukrainian president to investigate Trump's political rivals in exchange for a meeting at the White House and a U.S. military aid package.

Taylor’s testimony put him at odds with Gordon Sondland, the Trump-appointed ambassador to the European Union who largely defended the president at his deposition last week.