california

Senior Class: Members of Congress Getting Older
A look at the generational makeup of the 115th Congress

Sens. Orrin G. Hatch of Utah and Dianne Feinstein of California are two of the three oldest senators in the chamber. (Douglas Graham/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Of the Senate’s three oldest members, two — 84-year-old Dianne Feinstein of California and 83-year-old Orrin G. Hatch of Utah — are facing re-election races next year, along with four other members of the silent generation.

The average age in the current Senate is 62, while the average age in the House is 58. Here’s a look at how the age at election has slowly increased over the years:

Man Arrested After Driving Into Crowd at Royce’s Office
Activists were protesting immigration policy outside California congressman’s district office

A California man was arrested after he allegedly drove his car into protesters at the Brea, California, office of Republican Rep. Ed Royce. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A man was arrested Thursday after he ran his car through protesters at Republican Rep. Ed Royce’s office in Brea, California.

Daniel Wenzek, a 56-year old Brea resident, was arrested on suspicion of a felony assault with a deadly weapon, according to the Orange County Register.

De Leon to Challenge Feinstein in California Senate Race
State Senate leader says Democratic incumbent is not liberal enough

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, left, has the support of fellow California Sen. Kamala Harris. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

State Senate Leader Kevin de Leon announced Sunday this he will challenge incumbent Sen. Dianne Feinstein in the California Senate race.

De Leon, 50, is taking on his fellow Democrat for not being liberal enough to represent the solid blue state. In his announcement video, he highlighted his own story as the youngest child of a single immigrant mother. 

Podcast: Primary Elections and Steve Bannon’s Role
The Big Story, Episode 75

Former Rep. Michael Grimm, R-N.Y., poses with former White House strategist Steve Bannon on Wednesday in Washington. (Michael Caputo via Twitter)

Roll Call political reporters Simone Pathé and Bridget Bowman explain how the primaries are shaping up ahead of the 2018 midterm elections amid a Republican Party civil war.

 

Soap Actress and Trump Surrogate to Challenge Ruiz
Kimberlin Brown spoke at last year’s Republican National Convention

Soap opera actress Kimberlin Brown is the first Republican candidate to announce a run against Democratic Rep. Raul Ruiz. (Kimberlin Brown Pelzer for Congress)

Soap opera actress Kimberlin Brown announced she would challenge Democratic Rep. Raul Ruiz in California’s 36th District.

Brown spoke at last year’s Republican National Convention and said in her announcement that she would work with both Democrats and President Donald Trump, the Los Angeles Times reported.

Bera’s Father Released From Prison
California congressman’s dad caught illegally funneling $270,000 to his son’s campaign

Rep. Ami Bera, D-Calif., has maintained he didn’t know about his father’s illegal campaign funding scheme.. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Ami Bera’s father has been released from federal prison seven weeks before the end of his full sentence of a year and a day.

Babulal Bera was given credit for good behavior, a spokeswoman for the federal Bureau of Prisons told The Associated Press, but will still check in with a probation officer for three years.

Pelosi Calls Out Trump for War on NFL, NBA
Sports are ‘where we put our differences aside,’ minority leader says

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said President Donald Trump should have used the controversy surrounding NFL national anthem protests as an opportunity to "bring people together.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

As President Donald Trump uninvited the NBA champion Golden State Warriors from their White House visit and called any NFL player who kneels during the national anthem before games a “son of a bitch” over the weekend, Rep. Nancy Pelosi struck a different tone about the interplay between sports and politics.

“I have always said sports and the arts will bring America together,” the House minority leader said Sunday on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “It’s where we put our differences aside.”

Rohrabacher’s Democratic Opponents Slam Comments About Charlottesville
Rohrabacher called violence during white supremacist rally a ‘total hoax’

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, R-Calif., is under fire for calling racial violence in Charlottesville, Va., “a total hoax.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Two of California Rep. Dana Rohrabacher's Democratic opponents lambasted him for calling racial violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, last month a “total hoax.”

In an interview with the San Francisco Chronicle, Rohrabacher said it was possible that a “former Hillary (Clinton) or Bernie (Sanders) supporter” organized “Civil War re-enactors” to rally around a statue of Robert E. Lee.

Senators Could Lose ‘Blue Slip’ Input on Circuit Judges
President would have less reason to consult with lawmakers

Senate Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley has signaled he might end a tradition that gives senators a de facto veto power over nominees to federal appeals courts. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A looming showdown over a Senate tradition could strip senators of a de facto veto power over nominees to federal appeals courts — and give President Donald Trump less reason to consult with senators about which judges should be appointed.

The Judiciary Committee’s “blue slip” process has required senators to return a blue slip of paper before the committee schedules hearings and markups of nominees for federal judgeships from their home states. No slip, no hearing. That has made it essential for the White House to get a senator’s buy-in on a nomination.

Opinion: ‘Medicare for All’ Is the New ‘Repeal and Replace’
Why Democrats may be in danger of repeating the GOP’s mistake

The fine print on “Medicare for All” is much more complex than some Democrats make it out to be, Murphy writes. (ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images file photo)

Even before the horrible events in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend, President Donald Trump was having a bad August.

He had already single-handedly escalated tensions with North Korea to the point that a nuclear strike suddenly seemed like a possibility for the first time in many Americans’ lifetimes.