Congress

Donald Trump is going to have to veto a congressional effort to stop his border security national emergency

With Sen. Rand Paul on board, the disapproval measure should have the votes to pass the Senate

Sen. Rand Paul is supporting the effort to stop he border security national emergency. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It appears President Donald Trump is going to have to veto bipartisan legislation that would stop his border security national emergency declaration.

The straightforward joint resolution disapproving of the emergency declaration appears to have reached the threshold of support needed to pass the Senate.

While not unexpected, Kentucky Republican Sen. Rand Paul made that clear during remarks Saturday at a GOP Lincoln Day Dinner that’s a fundraiser for the Warren County Republican Party.

“I can’t vote to give the president the power to spend money that hasn’t been appropriated by Congress,” Paul said, according to the Bowling Green Daily News. “We may want more money for border security, but Congress didn’t authorize it. If we take away those checks and balances, it’s a dangerous thing.”

The newspaper reported that Paul’s remarks were otherwise favorable toward the president.

But his effective announcement on the emergency declaration was noteworthy for the purposes of Senate vote counting. Republican Sens. Susan Collins of Maine and Lisa Murkowski of Alaska are original co-sponsors of the Senate version of the disapproval measure, and Sen. Thom Tillis of North Carolina has already expressed support.

That means, assuming support from all members of the Senate Democratic caucus, the legislation will be able to pass the Senate, forcing a presidential veto.

Republicans could still make an effort to change the language, but the odds of amendments being adopted seems unlikely at best, since the measure is being considered under an expedited process that will mean only a simple-majority of support is required for final passage.

Watch: Trump announces national emergency on border, despite likely legal challenge

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