Sheila Weinberg

There are at least eight accountants in Congress. Maybe they can pop the debt balloon
Budgeting and running the numbers is what CPAs do

OPINION — Whether it is the Green New Deal or a wall along the nation’s southern border, the 2020 presidential race is already teeming with expansive policy proposals and politicians seeking to differentiate themselves from the pack. If there is one theme that unites these proposals, it’s the expense. It’s not easy to excite voters with promises to cut programs, conserve money, or increase taxes.

All the new proposals have their key constituencies, but what about some ideas that speak to all American taxpayers? The ever-increasing national debt is an issue that everyone should care about. While Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell are unlikely to completely solve the problem overnight, there is an easy first step that would send a clear signal to the American people.

Act Now: Promote Long-Term Fiscal Transparency | Commentary

As more 2016 candidates announce their presidential bids, they’ll start discussing issues Americans care about the most. But there’s one issue where neither Democrats nor Republicans are telling the truth due to inaccurate financial reporting — our national debt.

Federal Debt: The Value Obama Didn't Address | Commentary

Under Article 2, Section 3 of the Constitution, the Founding Fathers indicated the president must brief Congress with information about and recommendations for the union. To me, this tradition represents an act of transparency, yet the president was not transparent about the federal government’s true debt in his State of the Union Address.

Bring Me More Fiscal Transparency | Commentary

Recently, Representative James B. Renacci, R-Ohio, introduced the Federal Financial Statement Transparency Act of 2014. This bill can help increase accountability and transparency in federal government financial reporting. The bill can also help bolster the independence of the Federal Accounting Standards Advisory Board, which determines accounting standards for the federal government.