Hunter Duncan still wants you to know he’s not Duncan Hunter

“I’m tired of people tweeting at me that I’m a ‘pr*ck‘ and should be in jail,” says Hunter Duncan

Rep. Duncan Hunter’s last day in Congress is Monday, Jan. 13. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
Rep. Duncan Hunter’s last day in Congress is Monday, Jan. 13. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
Posted January 13, 2020 at 4:58pm

Hunter Duncan is just an aspiring comedian in Austin, Texas, who’s tired of being mistaken for the embattled congressman from California.

“I’m tired of people tweeting at me that I’m a ‘pr*ck’ and should be in jail,” Duncan has said.

The not-congressman is referring to the congressman who announced in December he would resign from Congress after pleading guilty to misusing campaign funds. Monday is the lawmaker’s last day on the job.

The comic, a Democrat who’s been to San Diego “once for work,” resolved to run as a Republican for California’s 50th District. After “extensive research,” he launched a GoFundMe campaign to cover the expenses of getting his name on the ballot.

“There’s only one way to get him out of office and it’s for my name ‘Hunter Duncan’ to be on the ballot with ‘Duncan Hunter,’” he said in his campaign announcement last year.

Hunter Duncan is a guy in Austin, TX who is tired of being confused for Rep. Duncan Hunter (GoFundMe)
Hunter Duncan is just a guy in Austin, Texas, who is tired of being confused for resigning Rep. Duncan Hunter. (GoFundMe)

He was ready to be “the representative Americans wouldn’t worry would vape in the House,” he told Heard on the Hill in a phone conversation.

Duncan formed a campaign committee, but failed to deliver the required signatures or $1,740 fee by the filing deadline. 

As for the $932 he raised through his GoFundMe campaign, “I wouldn’t spend a dime of donor dollars on anything like tequila, Hawaiian shirts or flying pet bunnies.” This week the former congressional hopeful returned the money he raised, he said. 

Despite Duncan (the guy in Texas) not running against Hunter (the guy in California), he’s still taking “100% credit” for the representative’s “guilty plea and eventual resignation.” He even has plans to host a “Mission Accomplished” party to celebrate.

“He quit. I win,” Duncan said.

Griffin Connolly contributed to this report.