Bannon, Papadopoulos, NRA complying with House Dems’ Trump corruption probe

House Judiciary Chairman Nadler has requested documents from 81 people and groups close to Trump

Former White House strategist Steve Bannon is among the people who have provided documents to House Democrats as part of a Judiciary Committee investigation. (Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images file photo)
Former White House strategist Steve Bannon is among the people who have provided documents to House Democrats as part of a Judiciary Committee investigation. (Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images file photo)
Posted March 19, 2019 at 6:13pm

Steve Bannon, George Papadopoulos, and the National Rifle Association are among the eight people and entities who have provided documents to House Democrats as part of the Judiciary Committee’s investigation into alleged corruption and obstruction of justice by President Donald Trump and his inner circle, according to a Republican aide with knowledge of the situation.

In February, Chairman Jerrold Nadler set a deadline for March 18 for the 81 people and entities to provide documents for the probe. That deadline passed with less than 10 percent in compliance, the GOP aide said.

Bannon, Trump’s former White House chief political strategist and 2016 campaign chief, provided the committee with 2,688 pages of information, the GOP aide said. The NRA has provided 1,466. Real estate investor and Trump confidant Thomas Barrack has handed over 3,349 pages.

Only five others on Nadler’s list of 81 have complied with the committee’s document request: 2016 Trump campaign advisers Papadopoulos, Sam Nunberg, and J.D. Gordon; former Russian intelligence officer Rinat Akhmetshin, who was at the 2016 Trump Tower meeting with advisers on the Trump campaign; and the Trump Inaugural Committee.

Former Cambridge Analytica consultant Brittany Kaiser sent her documents on Monday, though they have not arrived yet, the GOP aide said.

But Nadler said Monday in a status update for the probe that despite the low percentage of people in compliance, Democrats are “encouraged by the responses” they have received since sending the document requests two weeks ago.

The committee has been promised “tens of thousands” of documents from “a large number” of people on the list, the New York Democrat said, though he declined to elaborate on who specifically had responded.

Many of the people on Nadler’s list have indicated they will comply with the document requests if they are issued a “friendly subpoena,” Nadler told reporters last Thursday.

Only “a handful” of the 81 people and groups have “been defiant and said, ‘No we’re not going to comply,’” Nadler said.

The list that Nadler wants to hear from for the probe includes a range of people in the president’s orbit. They include his adult children (some of whom work in his administration), his convicted former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, and the controversy-plagued campaign consulting group Cambridge Analytica.

Nadler did not say how quickly he will initiate the process of issuing subpoenas to compel witness testimony and document disclosure. But he indicated Thursday that he did not intend to abuse that congressional tool.

“We’re not a subpoena production factory,” Nadler said. “We’re not in business for the purpose of issuing subpoenas. … The purpose is to get information back.”

Trump initially suggested that he will cooperate with the Judiciary Committee’s probe. 

“I cooperate all the time with everybody,” Trump said during a reception for the NCAA Division I Football Championship Subdivision Champion North Dakota State Bison football team on March 4. 

But then, he added, “It’s a political hoax.”

The next day, Trump went into full attack mode, tweeting that the Democrats “have gone stone cold CRAZY” and that the 81 letters were “sent to innocent people to harass them.”

His press secretary, Sarah Sanders, has dubbed the House Judiciary Committee probe a “fishing expedition.”

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