Poll: Slight Majority of Americans Disapprove of Graham-Cassidy

Only 18 percent of independents approve of latest GOP effort to replace 2010 health care law

From left, Sens. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., John Cornyn, R-Texas, John Barrasso, R-Wyo., Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., Bill Cassidy, R-La., Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and John Thune, R-S.D., are pushing on the latest iteration of a far-reaching health care bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
From left, Sens. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., John Cornyn, R-Texas, John Barrasso, R-Wyo., Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., Bill Cassidy, R-La., Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., and John Thune, R-S.D., are pushing on the latest iteration of a far-reaching health care bill. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
Posted September 25, 2017 at 8:13am

A new poll shows that a majority of Americans disapprove of the latest Republican legislation to replace the 2010 health care law.

The CBS News poll released Monday found that 52 percent of those surveyed disapprove of the law being proposed by Republican Sens. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, Bill Cassidy of Louisiana, Ron Johnson of Wisconsin and Dean Heller of Nevada.

Only 20 percent of those polled approved of the legislation. The bill is also unpopular with many Republicans, with only 46 percent of those who identified as Republicans supporting the legislation. Only 18 percent of independents approved of it.

More than a quarter of respondents did not give an opinion of the bill.

At the same time, 65 percent of Americans said that there were good things in the law known as Obamacare, but that the law needs changes. Only 9 percent said the law was good as is.

The poll comes as Republican efforts to push through legislation are in peril after Sen. John McCain of Arizona announced his opposition.

McCain objected that he could not vote for the bill due to there not being a full score from the Congressional Budget Office or how it will affect insurance premiums.

Those objections are similar to those of people polled as 42 percent of them thought Republicans were moving too fast. But 40 percent of those who identified as Republicans thought Republicans in Congress were moving too slowly.

The poll surveyed a random sample of 1,202 adults nationwide by phone between Thursday and Sunday. It had a sampling error of 3 percentage points.