Baseball Practice Shooting Mix-Up: Capitol Police Sent to Pelosi’s Georgetown Home

Alexandria address was not originally given to USCP team

Alexandria Police stand next to a SUV with a shattered window across the street from Eugene Simpson Stadium Park in Alexandria, Va. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)
Alexandria Police stand next to a SUV with a shattered window across the street from Eugene Simpson Stadium Park in Alexandria, Va. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)
Posted July 31, 2017 at 5:58pm

The Capitol Police Containment and Emergency Response Team was directed to Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi’s house the day of the Republican baseball practice shooting, as oppose to the Alexandra, Va., field where the incident occurred, Bloomberg first reported.

There is an open internal investigation about how Pelosi’s Georgetown home was given as the address on June 15 when gunman James Hodgkinson opened fire on the practice.

It’s unclear how much time was lost, according to Bloomberg. Local Alexandria police officers responded quickly.

The mix-up could be that the wrong transponder code was assigned, Bloomberg reported, since both Pelosi and Whip Steve Scalise, R-La., who was shot, are both congressional leaders.

Capitol Police agents David Bailey and Crystal Griner were already at the field because they were on Scalise’s security detail. Witnesses on the field have attributed Hodgkinson’s take down to them.

The day after the shooting, former Senate Sergeant-at-Arms and Capitol Police Chief Terrance Gainer told Roll Call it’s standard practice after major incidents that the Capitol Police Board and the department itself conduct reviews of the shooting.

“People who are responsible for protecting other folks are going to say, ‘Was there one of those dots or several of those dots that we should have connected but did not?’” Gainer said.

It’s not clear if any report detailing the response to the shooting would be made public. Capitol Police are exempt from providing information through the Freedom of Information Act regarding responses to emergency situations, unless the department determines that releasing the information would not harm Capitol security.

Bridget Bowman contributed to this report.