‘Aunt Hillary,’ You’re Embarrassing the Kids

Clinton's attempts to relate to younger voters have largely fallen flat

Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton talked education, jobs and immigration during a campaign rally in Annandale, Virginia, on Thursday. (Tom Clark/CQ Roll Call)
Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton talked education, jobs and immigration during a campaign rally in Annandale, Virginia, on Thursday. (Tom Clark/CQ Roll Call)
Posted July 15, 2016 at 11:27am
Hillary Clinton’s latest attempt to look hip for the kids got the same reaction as her earlier ones, namely from her Republican opponent Donald Trump — ridicule.
  
“I don’t know who created Pokemon Go,” she said at an event in Virginia. “But I’m trying to figure out how we get them to have Pokemon Go to the polls.”

 
Trump posted a parody video called “Crooked Hillary No” featuring a Pokeball being thrown and capturing Clinton in the fashion of the video game, including a parody Pokedex description of her characteristics like “Often found lying to the American People, rigging the system and sharing top secret emails.”
 

Clinton has a problem with younger voters, and she knows it. And she’s trying hard to win over those younger voters who put Barack Obama in the White House. 

Last year on the campaign trail, she told a crowd that she had just joined Snapchat and joked that “those messages disappear all by themselves.” But the joke was seen as tone deaf in light of questions surrounding her use of a private email server.
 
Her campaign also made an attempt to appeal to millennial voters concerned about student debt by asking them to tweet their reaction in emojis

 
Then there was that time that Ellen DeGeneres and tWitch tried to teach her to whip and nae nae.

 
Much of this came during her campaign against Sen. Bernie Sanders, who gained popularity with younger voters without having to try.
 
Even Obama had a little fun with “Aunt Hillary” during the White House Correspondents Dinner.

 

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