The Australian Growler: Ready to Fly, Ready to Jam

Royal Australian Air Force gaining airborne electronic attack capability with first EA-18G Growler (Boeing photo)
Royal Australian Air Force gaining airborne electronic attack capability with first EA-18G Growler (Boeing photo)
Posted July 29, 2015 at 1:26pm

Boeing and the U.S. Navy extended advanced airborne electronic attack (AEA) capability to a key U.S. ally, presenting the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) with its first EA-18G Growler.  

Australia joins the U.S.  as the only two nations to have airborne electronic attack capability. The Growler’s radar-jamming devices deceive and frustrate enemy forces and allow strike jets to carry out their missions undetected.  

“The Growlers really complement our combat capability, our legacy fighters, our Super Hornets and the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF); they’ll be a lot more  lethal when you have a Growler up there to support,” said Wing Cmdr. Cameron Cornell, deputy project manager, Australian Growler program. Members of the Royal Australian Air Force will train with the U.S. Navy to learn the intricacies of controlling the electromagnetic spectrum.  

The Royal Australian Growler recently demonstrated its agile flight capabilities during its first flight in St. Louis, Mo., where the Growler and Super Hornet assembly lines are located. Check out the video below to see the Australian Growler’s air prowess in action and learn more about Australia’s desire to master the art of electronic deception.