Hundreds of Protesters Take to Denver Streets

Posted August 24, 2008 at 8:36pm

About 500 protesters marched through Denver on Sunday in largely peaceful protests against the Iraq War, the Bush administration and the power of the federal government.

The protesters marched for about two hours before and were trailed by police throughout the day. At least one arrest was made at the state Capitol, where police blockaded protesters from entering the street.

“Two, four, six, eight — this is a police state,” was one of many chants heard throughout the streets, as mostly young and middle-aged protesters carried black-and-orange flags and “Impeach Bush” signs.

“This is what democracy looks like,” became a louder chant as police demanded the protesters to move back from the street at the Capitol.

This march was the second protest of the day, even though the Democratic National Convention does not begin until Monday. A series of protest and resistance events are planned throughout week.

Pedestrians on the 16th Street Mall, a shopping and entertainment district in downtown Denver, witnessed the large group filter through the grounds, delaying traffic and attracting viewers.

“I was expecting it, but you just never really expect this many people, this many protesters, police. I’ve been here all my life, and I’ve never seen anything like it,” said Vennisa Lewis, 40, of Denver.

Although most of the protesters were marching for a cause, some were participating for the experience.

“I was just checking it out, to see how history happens,” said participant Brian Braukhoff, 26, of Denver. “I wanted to see what freedom feels like, what is tastes like.”

In a festival-type atmosphere, organized by Re-create 68, about 15 different interest groups set up outside the Capitol, including Food Not Bombs, Planned Parenthood and others. On Monday and Tuesday, they will be represented in the Civic Center Park and on Wednesday and Thursday at Skyline Park.

Reclaim The Streets is a collective group and resistance movement, while Re-create 68 is a grass-roots alliance of local activists.