House IG Completes Page Report

Posted February 12, 2008 at 3:02pm

In a recently completed report studying last year’s expulsion of four House pages, the House Inspector General found that supervision of personnel who reside at the page residence hall needs “significant” improvement.

The IG report has not been released publicly.

But in a Feb. 11 letter to House Page Board Chairman Dale Kildee (D-Mich.), Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Minority Leader John Boehner (R-Ohio) write that the IG found that there is no written policy for the adult employees who live at the residence hall, which is located south of the Congressional campus.

“The Inspector General has recommended that the Clerk of the House establish a clear, written visitor policy for the Residence Hall that clearly identifies the visitors who are allowed and visitation hours,” the duo write.

Kildee’s office declined to release the actual report, referring calls to the offices of Pelosi and Boehner.

Pelosi and Boehner also write that Kildee should take “whatever further steps are necessary” to implement the IG’s recommendations. Pelosi and Boehner said they plan to select “an appropriate outside entity” to undertake a thorough review of the entire program, the duo write.

Clerk Lorraine Miller already has begun implementing the IG’s recommendations, Kildee said in a statement released on Tuesday.

“The House Page Board will meet this week to review the implementation now in place and to discuss any further changes in Page Program policy,” Kildee said. “I find both the Inspector General’s report and the House Leaders’ letter to be very helpful in addressing the needs of the Page Program.”

The pages who were expelled were accused of shoplifting and engaging in public sex acts. Those expulsions eventually led Reps. Ginny Brown-Waite (R-Fla.) and Shelley Moore Capito (R-W.Va.) to resign from their positions from the Page Board, with the two Members complaining that the program was flawed and improperly managed.

Pelosi and Boehner jointly asked House Inspector General James Cornell to investigate the program shortly afterward.