Pump It Up

Posted July 20, 2007 at 5:58pm

After funding for the project was given a green light in the House version of the 2007 legislative branch appropriations bill, Architect of the Capitol officials are moving forward with a plan to put an ethanol fueling station on Capitol Hill. [IMGCAP(1)]

A presolicitation notice issued last week seeks a contractor to design and construct an E85 pumping station at its existing fueling station. The E85 pump, which House Democratic leaders have said is an important part of plans to “green the Capitol,” would be fed by a new 10,000-gallon underground storage tank and be connected to existing monitoring and accounting equipment. The new pumping island would also require the design of a new traffic pattern at the existing fueling facility.

The project is expected to cost from $250,000 to $500,000, and the AOC is hoping to receive proposals by early September.

Movement at the Top. The Government Printing Office announced last week that the agency’s chief information officer is set to become its chief technology officer.

Reynold Schweickhardt will be in charge of identifying new technology as the GPO moves forward in the printing and digital marketplace, according to a GPO press release. He also will continue to work with industry and government partners to create security and technology features for the U.S. passport and other government documents.

Meanwhile, another top official is getting a title change. Chief Technical Officer Michael Wash will take the helm as CIO, overseeing the strategic execution of information systems within the agency.

Wash helped develop the agency’s future digital system, which will launch next year. Commonly called FDsys, the new system will let federal content creators create and submit content that can then be preserved, authenticated, managed and delivered.

The two changes are consistent with an overall shift at the agency to a more digital focus, part of a long-term plan that has been in the works for years, GPO spokeswoman Caroline Scullin said.

— John McArdle and Elizabeth Brotherton