Screen on the Green Kicks Off Tonight

Posted July 15, 2005 at 5:11pm

Screen on the Green returns tonight for its seventh year with a lineup full of classics.

Located on the National Mall between Fourth and Seventh streets Northwest, the film festival kicks off with “The Way We Were,” starring Barbara Streisand and Robert Redford as two people trying to work through their differences to find love.

Screenings continue each Monday until Aug. 15. “The Treasure of Sierra Madre,” is the feature on July 25, Hitchcock’s “Suspicion” screens Aug. 1, “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” will be shown Aug. 8, and the series wraps up with the Bogart classic “The Big Sleep” on Aug. 15.

Screenings are free and will not be rescheduled in the event of inclement weather. Guests are advised to arrive early.

Anacostia Reclamation Bills Pass House

Two provisions passed by the House last week as part of this year’s Water Resources Development Act would bring coordinated regional support and millions of dollars in federal funding to the effort to reclaim D.C.’s “forgotten waterway,” the Anacostia River.

The first of the two provisions, both sponsored by D.C. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D), would require the secretary of the Army, which oversees the Army Corps of Engineers, to coordinate with several regional agencies in the development of a 10-year comprehensive action plan for the restoration and protection of the Anacostia and its tributaries. Those agencies include the office of the mayor of the District of Columbia, the governors of Maryland and Virginia, and the county executives of Montgomery County and Prince George’s County in Maryland.

The second provision authorizes $35 million in federal funds to begin updating and replacing the District’s antiquated combined sewer system, the river’s largest source of pollution, and $20 million to continue clean-up efforts along the Anacostia.

Some environmental experts have estimated that fixing Washington’s sewer system could cost $600 million to $800 million and might take as long as 15 years.

— Sonny Bunch and John McArdle