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Stuart Rothenberg

Bio:

Stuart Rothenberg is editor and publisher of the Rothenberg Political Report, a nonpartisan, nonideological political newsletter covering U.S. House, Senate and gubernatorial campaigns. He is also a twice-a-week columnist for Roll Call. His column covers campaigns, elections, presidential politics and current political developments.

He holds a B.A. from Colby College (Waterville, Maine) and a Ph.D. in political science from the University of Connecticut. He has taught at Bucknell University (Lewisburg, Pennsylvania) and at the Catholic University of America (Washington, D.C.).

A frequent soundbite, Stu has appeared on Meet the Press, This Week, Face the Nation, the NewsHour, Nightline and many other television programs. He is often quoted in the nation's major media, and his op-eds have appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal and other newspapers.

Stu served during the 2008 and 2010 election cycles as an analyst for the NewsHour on PBS. During the 2006 cycle, he was a political analyst for CBS News. Prior to that, he was a political analyst for CNN for over a decade, including election nights from 1992 through 2004. He has also done on-air analysis for the Voice of America.

He is married, has two children and lives in Potomac, Md.

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Stories by Stuart Rothenberg:

Jolly Wins Special, Florida’s 13th Starts as Lean Republican for Midterm

March 11, 2014

Republican David Jolly eked out a narrow win over Democrat Alex Sink to keep the late congressman Bill Young’s seat in the GOP column. Polls had shown the race close, but most observers expected Sink, who lost the governor’s race narrowly in 2010, to defeat Jolly by 2 or 3 points.

Why Polls Still Show Democrats With Higher Marks Than Republicans

March 10, 2014

Political brands are important. If a candidate or political party has a damaged political brand, it’s harder for them to sell themselves to voters. But sometimes a poll’s top lines can be deceiving, so you need to look a little below the surface to understand what is going on.

Bill Clinton's Real Impact on the Kentucky Senate Race

March 5, 2014

The national media’s reaction to former President Bill Clinton’s recent trip to Kentucky to boost the Senate candidacy of Democratic Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes was predictable.

There's No Good Time for the GOP on Immigration

Feb. 25, 2014

GOP leaders on Capitol Hill apparently have already decided to punt rather than push ahead with their own immigration proposal, but that hasn’t stopped the chatter from the sidelines, especially from those who don’t like the leadership’s decision.

How Jamestown Associates Adapted and Prospered

Feb. 20, 2014

You probably think the recent spat between the National Republican Senatorial Committee (and really the entire GOP establishment) and Jamestown Associates, a GOP consulting firm, is interesting because it reflects the fissure in the Republican Party. But after covering campaigns for decades, I think it’s also a fascinating story of how a media firm has evolved and adapted to a changing political environment.

DCCC Is 2013 Fundraising Winner, but DNC Drops the Ball

Feb. 10, 2014

A look at the end-of-the-year financial reports of the two House campaign committees, two Senate campaign committees and two national party committees makes it pretty clear which ones have something to crow about and which have some explaining to do.

American Crossroads Preparing to Enter the Game

Feb. 7, 2014

More than a few Republican operatives have been expressing nervousness about whether American Crossroads, the party’s big super PAC that was so active in 2010 and 2012, will play another significant role this cycle. They note that Americans for Prosperity has been carrying the “outside” load so far against Democratic super PACs and wonder how long that can continue.

For Democrats, It’s All About (Years) After November

Feb. 3, 2014

Politics is often about keeping one eye on today and another eye on tomorrow. That’s especially true for Democrats, who should not be completely disheartened about their party’s prospects.

The Return of 'Inside Politics' on CNN, Sort Of

Jan. 31, 2014

It was eight and a half years ago that I wrote a Roll Call column saying goodbye to “Inside Politics,” the five-days-a-week CNN program that not only helped launch my career as a political analyst and handicapper, but, more importantly, constituted the gold standard for in-depth political coverage on weekday TV.

Income Inequality: Democrats Have Some Work to Do

Jan. 28, 2014

The 14th question of the Jan. 22-25 NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll produced a set of responses I didn’t expect.

You Can’t Make This Stuff Up — and It's Only January

Jan. 27, 2014

Sometimes, it’s difficult to tell the difference between a real news story and something from The Onion.

The Christie Investigation: From Inquiry to Lynching?

Jan. 15, 2014

The two key questions are obvious. What did New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie know, and when did he know it?

Rothenberg’s Dangerous Dozen Open House Seats

Jan. 14, 2014

I wrote my first Dangerous Dozen open House seats column in this space 14 years ago, so I figured I might as well keep the streak going, though it isn’t nearly as impressive as Joe DiMaggio’s 56-game hitting streak.

The Race Democrats Can't Afford to Lose

Jan. 9, 2014

It’s rare in politics that anything other than a presidential contest is viewed as a “must win” — but the special election in Florida’s 13th District falls into that category for Democrats.

Early TV Ads: Not New and Mostly a Waste of Money

Jan. 7, 2014

By mid-December, more than $17.5 million had been spent on TV ads in just four Senate contests: in North Carolina ($8.3 million), Kentucky ($3.5 million), Arkansas ($3.4 million) and Louisiana ($2.3 million), according to a recent piece by Roll Call’s Kyle Trygstad.

Race Ratings Change: Arkansas Senate

Dec. 19, 2013

The Arkansas Senate race continues to be close and hard-fought. Polling shows the race extremely competitive, and both sides have already spent heavily. Democratic Sen. Mark Pryor has spent almost $900,000 on his re-election bid, while Republican challenger Tom Cotton’s campaign has spent more than $300,000. Outside groups have also been heavily involved.

What the New Iowa Poll Reveals About 2016 (Hint: Not Much)

Dec. 18, 2013

A new Des Moines Register poll of Iowans’ attitudes toward potential 2016 presidential hopefuls has already received plenty of attention. That’s not surprising, I suppose, given the unquenchable thirst from some about anything to do with the next presidential race.

Is Arkansas Really the Land of Opportunity for Democrats?

Dec. 16, 2013

When we think of political battlegrounds, states like Ohio and Florida come to mind. But every so often, a small state becomes a partisan political battleground.

The DNC's Deceptive Message on Louisiana

Dec. 12, 2013

I wasn’t surprised to get an email recently from a regional Democratic National Committee press secretary seeking to tarnish the credentials of Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal.

Awards for the Best and Worst of Politics in 2013

Dec. 9, 2013

Yes, folks, it’s time again for my end-of-the-year awards. It’s been a weird year, but face it: Weird is the new normal in politics.

Cochran to Seek Re-Election in Mississippi

Dec. 6, 2013

Mississippi Sen. Thad Cochran has decided to seek re-election and is expected to announce that decision shortly. The Republican incumbent will likely face a competitive primary election against state Sen. Chris McDaniel.

The Democratic Leadership Council's Advice for Republicans

Dec. 5, 2013

If you, like George Santayana, believe that those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it, you may want to take a look at Democratic Leadership Council founder Al From’s new book, “The New Democrats and the Return to Power,” just published by Palgrave Macmillan.

A Traditional Midterm Headache for Democrats

Dec. 3, 2013

Democrats have had a nice run recently of interesting House recruits and new takeover opportunities resulting from open GOP seats. And yet, it probably won’t matter.

If Linda Lingle Could, Why Can’t Wendy Davis?

Nov. 25, 2013

As longtime readers of this column know, voters in one-party states sometimes elect the nominee of the “wrong” party as governor. Today’s question is whether state Sen. Wendy Davis, a Democrat, has a fighting chance to win next year’s gubernatorial election in Texas, which remains a rock-solid Republican state.

The Most Divided House District in New York

Nov. 18, 2013

Last month I wrote about a handful of interesting Democratic House candidates I had recently interviewed, but I did not include Martha Robertson, who is challenging GOP Rep. Tom Reed in New York’s 23rd District.

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