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David Hawkings

Bio:

Senior Editor David Hawkings writes the “Hawkings Here” blog and column for Roll Call.

His aim is to provide penetrating, non-partisan and forward-looking analysis of policies being formed on Capitol Hill – and the people and politics driving the debates.

Hawkings has been a passionate Congress-watcher at CQ Roll Call for two decades.

Before his current assignment, he spent two years as founding editor of the company’s Daily Briefing and six years as managing editor of CQ Weekly.

He’s also been senior editor for legislative affairs; the magazine’s economics editor and its congressional affairs editor; and co-editor of “Politics in America,” the signature reference work on members of Congress.

He offers analysis every Monday and Friday on NPR’s Washington affiliate, WAMU, and is a regular guest analyst on Fox News, CNN and MSNBC.

Before joining the company, he was a correspondent in the Washington Bureau of Thomson Newspapers and a reporter, columnist and editor at the San Antonio Light.

He’s a native of New York and a graduate of Bucknell University.

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Stories by David Hawkings:

Wave Would Mean a Diversity Boost for House GOP

Oct. 28, 2014

After the probability of a Republican takeover of the Senate (for the first time in eight years) and the possibility that more than six governors will be defeated (for the first time in 30 years) comes the other big subplot of the midterm elections: Will Republicans win more than 56 percent of House districts for only the second time since World War II?

Voter Engagement Gap Hints at GOP Turnout Edge

Oct. 15, 2014

Twenty days out, and the sum of all the polling, computer modeling and intangibles says that both Senate storylines are still possible. The headline defining the midterm elections could end up being written by a few thousand people scattered west of the Mississippi and east of the Rockies — voters who may not decide until the afternoon of Nov. 4 whether to head to the local library or school cafeteria to cast the decisive ballots.

The Hillary Clinton 2014 Campaign Tour: Helping Democratic Women, One Swing State at a Time

Oct. 7, 2014

They are matches made in Democratic political consultant heaven: More than a dozen statewide candidates whose fortunes could turn on turnout by women, each paired with the woman getting ready to run again toward what she’s dubbed “that highest, hardest glass ceiling in American politics.”

A Senator to Replace Holder?

Oct. 1, 2014

The latest round of Cabinet handicapping is well underway, a welter of uninformed speculation (mixed with some White House trial balloons) about who might be nominated as attorney general. And the names of three Democratic senators keep getting bandied about — although they’ve all, with varying degrees of intensity, denied interest in the appointment.

Shutdown as Campaign Issue? That Was So Last Year

Sept. 30, 2014

Even before the government started shutting down, one year ago Tuesday night, it seemed a sure bet that throughout the coming campaign congressional Republicans would be made to rue the political consequences of their showdown strategy.

James Traficant Dies Following Tractor Accident

Sept. 27, 2014

James A. Traficant Jr., an Ohio Democrat whose career as a colorfully combative congressional gadfly ended in 2002 when he became the fifth House member ever expelled, died Saturday at a hospital in his native Youngstown. He was 73 and had been critically injured Sept. 23, when the tractor he was driving at his family farm flipped over.

Latest Partisan Divide: Religion and Politics Should Mix

Sept. 24, 2014

“Never discuss politics or religion in polite company” is one of those rules to live by that family elders have been passing on for generations.

Conservatives Pick Mike Lee as His Ambitious Pals Eye 2016

Sept. 18, 2014

The caucus of the most conservative senators has chosen a new leader. It’s not either of the Republicans who will probably come to mind first — but he may well be the man who’s going to push the Senate hardest to the right over the long term.

On Ebola, Obama's Bold Move Is Greeted on Hill With Eager Assent

Sept. 16, 2014

Contrary to what seemed certain as the week began, American military boots will soon be on the ground to combat a societal scourge on the other side of the world. And virtually no one in Congress sounds opposed to the idea.

First Clinton, Now Biden Offer Iowa Their Versions of 2016 Populism

Sept. 16, 2014

She went out to grill some beef, and now he’s going out to help some nuns.

Nuclear Option Helped Obama Refashion Bench

Sept. 15, 2014

Ten months after his fellow Democrats “went nuclear” in the Senate on his behalf, President Barack Obama is done putting his stamp on the federal judiciary — at least for the year, but maybe forever if Republicans take control of the place.

Campaign Money Debate Won't Help Hill's Reputation

Sept. 10, 2014

It’s nothing more than another Senate floor sideshow this week, a stage-managed debate in slow motion where the ultimate outcome is such a decisive and foreordained defeat that almost no one is paying attention.

Heirs Out, Entrepreneurs In on 50 Richest List

Sept. 10, 2014

Ten years ago, the 50 wealthiest members of Congress were 60 percent Republican even though the GOP held 52 percent of all the seats — just like this time. Then, as now, all the lawmakers on the roster were white, no more than 1 in 5 was a woman and a dozen of them had spouses to thank for the bulk of their money.

Really Rich and Endangered: 50 Richest on the Ballot

Sept. 7, 2014

This week’s unveiling of the 50 richest members of Congress, a signature Roll Call annual report, will underscore the recent reality that about 10 percent of the nation’s lawmakers are in the 1 percent when it comes to their net worth.

Rhetoric Overload, Four Decades After Nixon

Aug. 5, 2014

Richard M. Nixon’s fate was effectively sealed 40 years ago today. It’s a curious coincidence at the start of an August recess when the extraordinarily serious matter of presidential impeachment is going to be tossed around in such a cavalier and cynical manner.

The Almost Invisible Final Days of a Once-Forceful Leader

July 30, 2014

Eric Cantor’s slow fade toward the exits of the House majority leader’s office is one day from its official completion. But as a practical matter he’s been almost invisible for several weeks.

Possible Senate GOP Majority Would Be Young, but Would Have Enough Elders for Heft

July 28, 2014

Conventional wisdom holds that if Republicans take the Senate, generational turnover and term limits will combine to produce a balky and potentially amateurish legislative process next year.

Why a Namesake Post Office Is All Barry Goldwater Might Get This Year

July 24, 2014

Few things Congress does come in for more ridicule than its penchant for naming post offices. While the exercise soaks up some floor time and keeps the clerks busy, it alters public policy not one bit. Instead, each new honorific provides lawmakers with nothing beyond a sliver of feel-good accomplishment.

Spending Impasse Solidifies With Midterm Results Holding Next Move

July 23, 2014

This week notwithstanding, this summer on the Hill has been less sticky than usual. But it’s shaping up to be as somnolent as ever.

Elizabeth Warren's Summer of Surrogacy Helps Keep 2016 Talk Alive

July 22, 2014

If Rand Paul is taking this summer’s most prominent turn in the Republican spotlight, then the same must be said for his Senate colleague Elizabeth Warren among the new generation of national Democratic players.

The Republican Civil War Takes a Turn for the Cheekily Uncivil

July 16, 2014

It’s rare, but sometimes an advertisement in Roll Call says as much about the state of congressional political infighting as our coverage.

Congressman of Lost Era Loved Earmarks, Magic Tricks

July 16, 2014

They don’t make members of Congress like Ken Gray any more. In today’s political climate, it would be next to impossible to make him up.

Delayed Benghazi Hearings Equal Deliberate Quiet

July 14, 2014

Whatever happened to that summer blockbuster, the one about terrorism and scandal that would be must-see congressional TV?

Boehner's Bet: Lawsuit Will Quiet Impeachment Calls

July 11, 2014

More seems curious than straightforward in Speaker John A. Boehner’s current plan for suing President Barack Obama.

Politics, Not Policy, Shape Bridge Over Highway Cliff

July 10, 2014

Thursday will see this year’s most consequential vote in the once-mighty House Ways and Means Committee — to propose one of the more assertive legislative punts in recent memory.

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