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David Hawkings

Bio:

David Hawkings has been editor of the CQ Roll Call Daily Briefing – which offers forward-looking, non-partisan analysis of the top stories in Congress and around official and political Washington, online or by e-mail before lunchtime every weekday – since its launch in November 2010. For six years before that he was managing editor of CQ Weekly, a magazine covering federal policies, people and politics. He’s has also been the senior editor for legislative affairs, economics editor, congressional affairs editor, managing editor for daily news and co-editor of "Politics in America," the company’s signature reference work on members of Congress. He offers analysis every Monday and Friday on NPR’s Washington affiliate, WAMU, and makes frequent appearances as a guest commentator on Fox News, CNN and MSNBC.

Before joining the company in 1995, he was a correspondent in the Washington Bureau of Thomson Newspapers and a reporter, columnist and editor at the San Antonio Light. He’s a native of New York and a graduate of Bucknell University.

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Stories by David Hawkings:

As Congress Returns for 9-Week Slog, 5 Areas Are Ripe for Compromise

April 27, 2014

Congress returns Monday afternoon for its longest run of the year — nine straight weeks when the lights will be on in at least one chamber. And, for so many glimmers of policymaking hope, it’s getting close to now-or-never time.

'Lying in Politics' Plaintiffs Go on Offense in Several New States

April 16, 2014

The lead plaintiff in the “Can you lie in politics?” case going before the Supreme Court next week, anti-abortion group Susan B. Anthony List, says Ohio’s law against false campaign assertions will stifle that state’s midterm congressional debates.

Can You Lie in Politics? Supreme Court Will Decide

April 14, 2014

The Supreme Court has made pretty clear that putting your money where your mouth is deserves broad protection as a form of free political speech. The justices are about to consider whether outright lying in a campaign deserves a similar First Amendment shield.

History Lesson for McAllister: Members Caught Pursuing Staffers Never Survive

April 9, 2014

Rep. Vance McAllister is showing every sign he’s hunkering down in hopes of saving his nascent political life. But recent House history signals that it’s going to be a futile pursuit.

A Case for Moran: 'Underpaid' Is Accurate

April 8, 2014

He’s sounding politically tone deaf, of course, but on the merits Rep. James P. Moran has a solid case to make about congressional compensation.

A Landmark Election Ruling, Made by Justices With Minimal Campaign Involvement

April 6, 2014

One way of looking at the latest Supreme Court decision speeding the flow of big money into elections — a ruling destined to have a bigger impact on the culture of Congress than anything that happens at the Capitol this year — is that one side’s definition of political reality narrowly prevailed over the other.

Ryan Budget Is High-Risk, Modest-Reward Strategy in an Election Year

April 1, 2014

An ocean of figures fill the final fiscal blueprint Paul D. Ryan will unveil as chairman of the House Budget Committee. But the number that matters most never appears: 16.

Camp Out, Rough Week: Michigan Delegation Facing Depleted Hill Clout

March 31, 2014

It’s shaping up to be a pretty rough week for Michigan. But the blows to its biggest business and its college basketball teams may be only a foretaste of something more consequentially harmful and longer lasting.

Campaigns, Take Note: Braley's, Brown's and McConnell's Unforced Errors Offer Lessons Aplenty

March 26, 2014

Running gets a lot tougher when you’ve injured yourself. Three topflight Senate candidates are about to find out whether their aspirations have been slowed a bit by a political stubbed toe — or hobbled indefinitely because they’ve shot themselves in the foot.

Hill's Bipartisan Deadlock on Phone Records May Be Easing

March 25, 2014

Eight months ago, in one of its most important and fascinatingly nonpartisan votes of recent memory, the House came up just seven members short of eviscerating the government’s vast effort to keep tabs on American phone habits.

Doctors Win, Jobless Lose: The GOP Confronts New Perception Problem

March 24, 2014

The week is still young, so there’s time left for the Republicans to change course. But for now, the party is moving assertively toward generating one of the most tin-eared headlines of this campaign year:

Oberweis’ Illinois Senate Bid Testing Theory That Persistence Pays Off

March 23, 2014

They don’t call him the Milk Dud for nothing, but right now, he is on a little roll.

Feinstein Shifts Slow-Burning Anger From Guns to Spies

March 12, 2014

Few senators wait until their 80s, or the start of their third decade in office, to have their breakout moment. But that’s what this past year has been for Dianne Feinstein.

Florida Tossup Tests Patterns for Special Elections

March 10, 2014

Whatever the outcome of Tuesday’s tight congressional contest in Tampa Bay, this footnote is assured: The winner will become the 64th person in the current House first sent to the Capitol by a special election. That’s an astonishing 15 percent of the membership.

Issa's Antics Again Try GOP's Patience, Complicate Party's Message

March 9, 2014

If Congress can sometimes be fairly compared to the fabled Faber College of “Animal House,” then Darrell Issa is the latest character to get marked for “double secret probation.”

Roll Call Round Table: After Cummings-Issa Dust-Up, a Look Back at Nasty House Fights

March 7, 2014

Just how nasty was the brouhaha between Oversight and Government Reform Chairman Darrell Issa and ranking member Elijah E. Cummings, anyway? And how did the resulting floor fight over a resolution to rap Issa on the knuckles compare to other partisan stunts?

These are questions that came up Thursday morning in our editorial meeting as Congressional Black Caucus members put forth the measure, and once we got going, the stories started flying. Bill Thomas crying! Nancy Pelosi turning out the lights and locking the House chamber! The days when legislative spats were settled with fisticuffs! Sure, partisan rancor these days is bad, but things have definitely been worse.

Year's Quirkiest Comeback Bid Could Complicate GOP's Senate Takeover Plan

March 5, 2014

Hill denizens of a certain age well remember the unpredictable Larry Pressler. He could be earning another entry as the answer to a political trivia question soon enough.

The Real Story of Texas GOP Primaries: Democratic Turnout

March 4, 2014

Parsing the Republican results from this year’s first-in-the-nation Texas primaries will surely dominate Wednesday’s political talk. The media will ask how nettlesome Rep. Steve Stockman’s challenge to Sen. John Cornyn proved to be and which of the 23 House members seeking re-election got the biggest scare? How easy was it for state Attorney General Greg Abbott to secure the gubernatorial nomination?

5 Reasons This Supposedly Boring Budget Year Could Be Anything But

March 2, 2014

The budget President Barack Obama sends to Congress on Tuesday will be a month late and hundreds of billions of dollars short.

For Camp's Tax Overhaul Plan, 'Dead on Arrival' May Be Beside the Point

Feb. 26, 2014

What is the point of launching a trial balloon that has already been fatally shot full of holes?

Debbie Dingell Eyes a Curious Glass Ceiling in Readying House Run

Feb. 26, 2014

If Debbie Dingell wins the campaign she’s formally launching on Friday — a solid if not quite certain bet — she’ll make history in more than the obvious way.

Supreme Court EPA Regulation Case Tests Limits, Balance of Power

Feb. 23, 2014

Republicans angry at President Barack Obama’s muscular use of executive authority are returning from recess more focused on litigation than on legislation.

'Taking One for the Team' Isn't a Concept Boehner Can Rely On

Feb. 12, 2014

People looking for clues about the current strength and future prospects of John A. Boehner’s speakership should come to one conclusion: He can no longer count on Republicans taking one for the team.

Senate Finance's New Chairman, Most Liberal Ever, Looks to Start Slow

Feb. 11, 2014

The book on Ron Wyden is that he’s one of the Capitol’s grandest thinkers, with a sprawling range of policy interests matched with wonkish expertise, and eager to work outside the box to put a bipartisan stamp on his many big ideas.

Where He Really Lives Aside, Sen. Pat Roberts Has Moved to His Right

Feb. 10, 2014

Sen. Pat Roberts might be in additional re-election trouble, thanks to a weekend story in The New York Times that’s generating buzz about how the Republican doesn’t have a home he can call his own in Kansas — but he does have a new case to make about his conservative credentials.

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