Politics

Kellyanne Conway’s ‘Revolutionary’ Fashion Fail
Her $3,600 Gucci coat inspired Twitter mockery Friday

Kellyanne Conway is seen here talking to former Vice President Dan Quayle and making a... statement. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Friday’s inaugural ceremonies featured the traditional sea of patriotically hued ties, more than one all-white pants suit and the new first lady’s elegant Ralph Lauren ensemble, which was admired by both sides of political Twitter.

And then there was Kellyanne Conway.

HHS Nominee Tom Price, Staff Aided Donors in Agency Battles
Democrats seek to undercut his nomination

Secretary of Health and Human Services nominee Rep. Tom Price, R-Ga., takes his seat before the start of his confirmation hearing in the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee on Wednesday, Jan. 18, 2017. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump’s choice to lead the Department of Health and Human Services has advocated on behalf of companies over the years with the federal agencies he may soon oversee. At least three of the companies aided by Georgia Republican Rep. Tom Price and his staff contributed to his campaign funds. 

A CQ Roll Call review of more than 5,600 pages of congressional correspondence with HHS employees provide a picture of a lawmaker who has taken a deep interest in the workings of the Medicare entitlement program’s payments to the health industry. Price, a former surgeon, or his staff also pressured the Food and Drug Administration and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to heed requests and complaints he received from donors and constituents. The documents were released in batches over the past couple of days in response to a Freedom of Information Act filed last year.

Inauguration Day in Photos: Trump Supporters Take to Mall, Protesters Light Up Streets
Jan. 20, 2017 as seen by Roll Call's photographers

People gather on the National Mall on Friday morning. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

As thousands gathered on the West Front of the Capitol to witness the swearing-in of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States, protesters attempted to block entrances to the mall and parade route and some caused damage to property in downtown D.C.

President Trump: 'From This Day Forward ... Only America First'
45th president signals major policy shifts in inaugural address

Donald Trump greets President Barack Obama moments before Trump was sworn in as the 45th president of the United States, on the West Front of the Capitol. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump, very much still in campaign mode, vowed in his inaugural address to use his new powers to turn the country inward and “rebuild” America, telling his countrymen and the world he will govern with a simple principle: “It’s going to be only America first.” 

In a striking scene, the bombastic businessman and former reality television star, spoke from the very spot where American political giants like Ronald Reagan and Barack Obama delivered their first remarks as commander in chief.

Trump Sworn In as 45th President
Chief Justice John Roberts administered the oath of office under gray skies

President-elect Donald Trump arrives on the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on January 20, 2017 in Washington, D.C. In today’s inauguration ceremony Trump becomes the 45th president of the United States. (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Donald Trump is the 45th president of the United States.

Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. administered the oath of office under gray skies on the West Front of the Capitol.

A Look Inside the Capitol: Lawmakers Prep for Inauguration Ceremony
Lawmakers were prepping for the rain and hoping for unity

California Rep. Doug LaMalfa arrives for President-elect Donald Trump's inauguration. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

As New York Republican Rep. Peter King gaveled in the House chamber at 10 a.m. for a quick pro forma session, there was an abnormal crowd of members in the chamber for what is typically a boring procedural necessity.

But on this Friday, a few hundred members gathered in the back of the chamber and lined up by class for their turn to exit the Capitol building and take their places on an erected platform to witness the inauguration of the 45th president of the United States.

Protesters Greet Inauguration Guests, Clash With Police in Streets
People swarm Metro stations, event entrances and damage property in protest against Trump

Firefighters quickly extinguished a fire near 13th and Massachusetts Ave. Friday morning before Donald Trump was sworn in. (Matt Rhodes for CQ Roll Call)

Updated 2:15 p.m. | Small and sometimes violent protests erupted around downtown D.C. Friday surrounding Donald Trump’s inauguration, resulting in “approximately” 95 arrests and minor injuries to two police officers, law enforcement officials said.

The events punctuated and threatened to disrupt an otherwise calm transfer of power that drew notably smaller crowds to the nation’s capital than previous inauguration ceremonies.

Live Coverage of Donald Trump’s Inauguration
Bushes arrive for 45th president’s swearing in

UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: President Donald J. Trump is sworn in as the 45th President of the United States by Chief Justice John Roberts on the West Front of the Capitol, January 20, 2017. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Donald Trump is being inaugurated today as the 45th president. Here is the latest from the scene around the Capitol and Washington:

Or watch our coverage on Twitter.

Trump’s Inauguration Day Arrives, With Many Questions
Top spokesman, amid concerns, vows ’we're ready to go’

Members of Marine Barracks Washington gather on the West Front of the Capitol on Inauguration Day before President-elect Donald Trump’s swearing in. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Updated at 9:51 a.m. | Washington is undergoing a major transformation, but Donald Trump’s inauguration brings more questions than answers.

To be sure, very little is known about what to expect from his much-anticipated inaugural address from the West Front of the Capitol. His top spokesman has promised a “personal” speech that is “unique” while laying out a vision for his presidency.

As Inauguration Crowds Depart, It’s Back to Work for the Senate
Cornyn prepared for Senate to stay as long as it takes — ‘all night, all weekend’ — to vote on Trump nominees

Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn, right, said he was prepared for the Senate to stay in session Friday for “as long as it takes” to confirm an assortment of President-elect Donald Trump’s nominees while Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer anticipated confirming only two Cabinet nominees. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Capitol complex will still be fortified when the Senate gets back to legislative action shortly after Donald Trump leaves the building for the first time as president.

Senators will waste little time starting to process Trump’s nominees, with national security positions expected to be the first out of the gate, though all that must wait for the Senate to have something to consent to, meaning nominations for people like retired Gen. James Mattis to be Defense secretary.

Ryan Still Doesn't Want to Run for President
Speaker says ‘the left’ is trying to delegitimize Trump’s presidency before it starts

Speaker Paul D. Ryan insists he still does not want to run for president. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan has been asked hundreds, if not thousands, of times if he wants to run for president one day. The answer has not changed. 

“No,” Ryan said in an interview with Charlie Rose scheduled to air on PBS late Thursday. “It’s just not an ambition that I’ve long harbored, or I’ve harbored.” 

Trump Administration’s First (Unofficial) Day in Washington
Spokesman clashes with Schumer; press credentials get you to nowhere

Several temporary toilets placed on Capitol grounds for the Inauguration have been labeled “Trump’s Tower” with a marker. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Inauguration Day is Friday but the Trump administration’s first official day in Washington was Thursday, as the incoming team clashed with Senate Democrats over its Cabinet nominations.

“There is no excuse,” White House Press Secretary-designee Sean Spicer said, for what he dubbed “delay tactics” by Senate Democrats on some of President-elect Donald Trump’s Cabinet selections. Spicer was in mid-administration form as he added that the Democrats’ tactics “call into question” whether they want a “government of continuity.”

Senate to Vote on at Least Two Cabinet Nominees Friday
Democrats are calling for more time to vet controversial nominees

Schumer said Democrats want more time to vet nominees. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate is expected to vote on at least two of President-elect Donald Trump’s Cabinet nominees after he is sworn in on Friday. 

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer said Thursday that he expected votes on retired Gens. John Kelly to be the next Homeland Security secretary and James Mattis to lead the Defense Department. Schumer also said debate will begin on Kansas Rep. Mike Pompeo’s nomination to be the CIA director, with a vote possible on Friday or early next week.

Maine Gov. LePage Ups Ante About Lewis
Refuses to back down from earlier remarks about Lewis, says NAACP should apologize to white people

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., was criticized by Maine Gov. Paul LePage for not attending President Elect Donald Trump's inauguration. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Maine Gov. Paul LePage is not backing down from comments he made about Rep. John Lewis boycotting incoming President Donald Trump’s inauguration.

On a radio interview last weekend, LePage said Lewis should remember that Republicans were the advocates for civil rights, the Portland Press Herald reported.

Graphic: How Trump Cabinet Compares to Other Presidents' First Cabinets
Expect fewer lawyers, more military experience

Steven Mnuchin, President-elect Donald Trump's nominee for Treasury secretary, spent time at Goldman Sachs and several hedge funds before getting nominated for Trump's Cabinet. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

By SEAN MCMINN and RANDY LEONARD CQ Roll Call

Donald Trump’s picks for his Cabinet have less government experience and schooling than the first Cabinets of the past three presidents. Trump's skews older, much wealthier and has fewer minorities.