Politics

Photo of the Day: A Bipartisan Embrace
The Senate majority leader announced the health care bill was pulled

Sens. Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D., and Susan Collins, R-Maine hug on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

After Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., announced the latest plan to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law had been pulled from the floor, a Democrat and a Republican embraced.

Trump Denies Being Distracted by NFL Flap
'I have plenty of time on my hands,' president says

President Donald Trump listens to a question from a member of the media after he returned to the White House from Florida on Sept. 14 after viewing hurricane damage there. On Tuesday, he denied being distracted by his feud with the NFL from helping Puerto Rico recover from Hurricane Maria. (Alex Wong/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump on Tuesday rejected any notion his war of words with NFL players, owners and various and sundry other professional athletes has kept him from adequately dealing with post-hurricane recovery in Puerto Rico, even as he kept at it and issued yet another bellicose warning to North Korea.

Earlier in the day, Trump brought his back-and-forth with the country’s top professional sport into its fifth consecutive day with a trio of morning tweets boasting about the Dallas Cowboys being booed in Arizona Monday night when they knelt in unison before the anthem played.

Senate GOP Shelves Vote on Latest Health Care Proposal

Sen. Bill Cassidy was pushing for a vote on a proposal to replace the current health insurance system this week. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate will not vote on a proposal to overhaul the 2010 health care law this week, senators said after Republicans hosted Vice President Mike Pence at their weekly closed-door lunches on Tuesday.

Consideration of the bill will be “postponed until we can get the votes,” Republican Sen. Roger Wicker, R-Miss., said after the lunch.

Ohio GOP Consultant Joins NRCC as Senior Adviser
Joe King, a friend of Steve Stivers, expected to direct independent expenditure efforts

NRCC Chairman Steve Stivers has been friends with incoming senior adviser Joe King since their Ohio State University days. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The National Republican Congressional Committee announced Tuesday that Joe King is joining the committee as senior adviser. 

The Ohio-based consultant is expected to direct the committee’s independent expenditure efforts once the wall goes up between NRCC’s official and outside spending arms in 2018. 

Why It Looks Like the Senate’s Debating the Defense Bill Again
Democrats anticipate GOP effort to reverse CFPB rule

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren expects the real floor business to be about overturning a consumer protection rule. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Reading the Senate schedule Tuesday might give off a serious sense of deja vu. But there is a reason for that. 

Officially, senators are getting set to debate proceeding to the Senate version of the annual defense authorization bill. But wait, one might ask: Wasn’t Armed Services Chairman John McCain just on the floor for days overseeing that bill? Yes.

Poll: Nearly 9 in 10 Americans Support a Program for Dreamers to Stay
Lawmakers working to find a solution by Trump’s deadline

Immigration rights demonstrators hold signs in front of the Trump International Hotel in Washington on Sept. 5 to oppose President Donald Trump’s decision to phase out the DACA program. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Nearly nine in 10 Americans support a program that allows undocumented childhood immigrants to remain in the United States, a Washington Post/ABC News poll found.

Eighty-six percent of respondents said they supported some kind of program for “undocumented immigrants to stay in the United States if they arrived here as a child, completed high school or military service and have not been convicted of a serious crime.”

Former Rep. Joe McDade Dies at 85
Pennsylvania Republican was cleared of bribery charges in 1996

Former Rep. Joe McDade listens as colleagues pay tribute to him on the House floor upon his retirement from Congress in 1998. (C-SPAN.org)

Former Pennsylvania Rep. Joseph M. McDade, who served 18 terms in Congress, died Sunday at his home in Fairfax, Virginia. He was 85.

McDade had previously been the top Republican on the House Appropriations Committee and was known for bringing federal money to Pennsylvania.

Trump Hits Cowboys, Keeping Alive Feud With NFL Players
President claims boos in Arizona were ‘loudest I have ever heard’ as team knelt

Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, third from right, and head coach Jason Garrett, far right, kneel with their team in a show of solidarity before the national anthem during Monday’s game against the Arizona Cardinals. (DallasCowboys.com)

On a busy day for Donald Trump that includes meetings with congressional tax writers and the president of Spain before a Republican Party fundraiser at a glitzy New York restaurant while a key GOP Senate primary race is settled, the president started his day again attacking professional football players.

Trump went after the Dallas Cowboys — the NFL’s most popular franchise — in tweets posted before 7 a.m. Tuesday, ensuring his brouhaha with some of the league’s players would enter its fourth day in the news cycle. The self-created feud with America’s top sports league gives Trump a way to cast players who kneel during the national anthem to protest perceived social ills as unpatriotic citizens who should lose their high-paying jobs.

GOP Civil War Heads South for Alabama Senate Race
Sen. Luther Strange and former Judge Roy Moore face off Tuesday

Sen. Luther Strange is running in the GOP runoff in Alabama’s Senate race. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

All eyes are on Alabama as voters head to the polls in a race that has thrown Republican Party divisions into the spotlight.

Sen. Luther Strange faces former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore in Tuesday’s special election primary runoff. Strange was appointed to the seat by disgraced Gov. Robert Bentley after former Sen. Jeff Sessions resigned to become attorney general. 

Full GOP Tax Proposal Will Wait Until Later
Outline to be released this week, but full treatment awaits budget resolution

House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady says more details on the GOP tax plan are coming, but not the full package. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

If the tax overhaul framework congressional leaders and White House officials are releasing Wednesday fails to appease rank-and-file member calls for more details, House Republican leaders may find themselves still short of the votes needed to pass a budget. That’s especially problematic given that tax writers are not planning to unveil a full tax plan until after the House and Senate pass a reconciled budget.

“After the unified Republican plan is announced on Wednesday, the House and Senate will turn toward passing a budget that includes reconciliation instructions that will ensure that we can deliver tax reform to the president’s desk by the end of the year,” House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady told reporters Monday during a break from a retreat the GOP committee members held to discuss the tax plan.

Collins Opposition to Graham-Cassidy Likely Dooms Obamacare Repeal
Third GOP senator announced against it

Maine Sen. Susan Collins announced her opposition to the Graham-Cassidy health care repeal proposal Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Sen. Susan Collins delivered the likely final blow to the Senate Republicans’ latest effort to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law.

“Sweeping reforms to our health care system and to Medicaid can’t be done well in a compressed time frame, especially when the actual bill is a moving target. Today, we find out that there is now a fourth version of the Graham-Cassidy proposal, which is as deeply flawed as the previous iterations,” the Maine Republican said in a statement of the effort spearheaded by Sens. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina and Bill Cassidy of Louisiana.

Amid Health Care Chaos, Graham and Cassidy Still Lacking Votes
Finance hearing rocked by protests, S&P prediction dire

A protester is taken out of a Senate Finance Committee hearing in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on the proposal by Sens. Lindsey Graham and Bill Cassidy to change the U.S. health insurance system. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate on Monday was consumed by a now-familiar sense of chaos as Republicans continued their quest to pass in an accelerated fashion a major overhaul of the U.S. health care system, even as protests erupted in the hallways of the Capitol and independent forecasters predicted dire consequences in the form of lost jobs and diminished economic activity. 

Sponsors of the bill, which would essentially turn all federal funding included in the 2010 health law into massive block grants to states, tried mightily to gather support, but the effort continued to hit fierce head winds.

Trump’s NFL Feud Competes With Health Care, Tax Pushes
Policy agenda has to contend with fights over flag, race and First Amendment

President Donald Trump has been unrelenting in his criticism of NFL players protesting during the national anthem. (White House photo)

President Donald Trump’s feud with the NFL over players kneeling during the national anthem continued Monday, threatening to overshadow his domestic agenda as several legislative matters approach crucial milestones.

White House officials wanted to focus on policy this week, with time dedicated to health care, taxes, and a new science, technology, engineering and mathematics education initiative led by the president’s daughter and senior adviser Ivanka Trump.

Democrats May Sink FAA Extension, Hurricane Tax Relief Package
Minority support needed to pass measure under fast track procedure

Democratic Whip Steny H. Hoyer, D-Md., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., oppose a GOP package to reauthorize the Federal Aviation Administration for six months and provide tax relief for hurricane victims. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Legislation that would reauthorize the Federal Aviation Administration for six months and provide tax relief to victims of recent hurricanes could fail on the House floor Monday evening amid Democratic opposition. 

The minority party’s support is needed to pass the measure under a fast-track procedure known as suspension of the rules. Two-thirds support is required for passage on the suspension calendar, meaning at least 50 Democrats would need to vote “yes” if all 240 Republicans support the legislation. 

Candidates to Rally Supporters Ahead of Alabama Senate Race
Each campaign will host a rally ahead Tuesday's election

Vice President Mike Pence will head to Alabama on Monday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Both Republican candidates in the Alabama Senate race are bringing in heavy hitters to rally their supporters on the eve of the GOP runoff.

Republican voters head to the polls Tuesday to choose between former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore and Sen. Luther Strange, who was appointed to the seat after former Sen. Jeff Sessions became attorney general. Both candidates will hold rallies on the eve of the election, highlighting outside forces that are backing their campaigns.