Politics

Trump Seeks Further Delay in Health Care Subsidy Lawsuit
Insurance plans, Democrats say uncertainty will continue

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer said the administration's actions will lead to more uncertainty in the health insurance markets. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Trump administration again delayed a decision in a major case that could upend the health insurance markets created by the 2010 health care law, in a motion filed in federal court Monday.

Justice Department lawyers asked in the motion for another 90-day delay in a case that centers on about $7 billion of annual subsidies that are aimed at making health care services more affordable for low-income people who gained coverage under the 2010 law.

Rokita and Messer Trade Accusations
Indiana Republican congressmen are both considering running for Senate against Donnelly

Rep. Todd Rokita  said fellow Indiana Republican Rep Luke Messer planted a story about him using campaign funds for a private plane. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Todd Rokita is accusing fellow Republican Rep. Luke Messer of planting a negative story about him in the media ahead of the two possibly facing in Indiana’s Senate race next year.

A recent post in Politico Pro revealed that Rokita had used $100,000 in campaign funds on use of a private plane. The story pointed out that he had broken no ethics rules or laws.

Rep. Al Green Releases Death Threats After Impeachment Stance
Included caller saying Texas Democrat should be lynched

Rep. Al Green, D-Texas, released threatening messages he received after calling for President Donald Trump's impeachment. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Texas Rep. Al Green released numerous messages that included threats of death and lynching after he called for the impeachment of President Donald Trump.

In the beginning of a video on Green’s Facebook page, He plays audio of racially derogatory remarks that called for him to be hanged, the Texas Tribune reported.

No Apology for Israel Over Trump’s Disclosure to Russians
Tillerson: ‘I don’t know that there’s anything to apologize for’

President Donald Trump (L) speaks during a joint statement with Israeli President Reuven Rivlin in Jerusalem on Monday. (Lior Mizrahi/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump does not plan to apologize to Israeli leaders for disclosing sensitive intelligence provided by the Jewish country to senior Russian diplomats.

Asked by reporters Monday on Air Force One if Trump will apologize to Israeli leaders for sharing password-only classified intelligence about an Islamic State plot to Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson replied: “I don’t know that there’s anything to apologize for.”

Michigan Businesswoman to Challenge Stabenow
Served as Co-chair of Donald Trump's presidential campaign

Lena Esptein, who announced her intent to run against Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow, said Michigan needs an outsider candidate with a business background. (Lena for Senate via YouTube)

Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow received her first Republican challenger as businesswoman Lena Epstein announced her candidacy for Michigan's Senate race.

Epstein is a third-generation co-owner of Vesco Oil Corp., which distributes automotive and industrial lubricants.

‘Law and Order’ President Meets Ultimate Lawman
Should Trump be concerned? ‘Absolutely,’ GOP strategist says

Sources and lawmakers describe former FBI Director Robert Mueller as a “superstar” and highly qualified to head the Russia investigation. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Donald Trump is fond of describing himself as a “law-and-order” president. Suddenly, however, the fate of his presidency could be decided by a man who embodies that characterization: Robert Mueller, a true lawman’s lawman.

The irony is thicker than a column on the White House’s North Portico. And for Trump, his party and the republic, the stakes could not be higher.

Chaffetz Resignation Sparks Conflict, Compressed Campaigns in Utah
Governor and state legislature disagree on special election timeline

Utah Rep. Jason Chaffetz says he will resign on June 30. (Al Drago/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

In any other year, Rep. Jason Chaffetz’s decision to resign would have sparked a crowded Republican primary. But as one Utah GOP operative put it, this year is not like any other year. 

Consultant Chuck Warren sat down with a state lawmaker Friday morning to talk about a possible run for Congress. The lawmaker pointed to a picture of his family and his home and said, “Why would I give that up to go up there and pound my head against a wall?”

How the Koch Network Could Sink Tax Overhaul
Lobbying network poised for policy win

WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 04: Americans for Prosperity Foundation chairman and Koch Industries Executive Vice President David H. Koch (C) listens to speakers during the Defending the American Dream Summit at the Washington Convention Center November 4, 2011 in Washington, DC. The conservative political summit is organized by Americans for Prosperity, which was founded with the support of Koch and his brother David H. Koch. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

The lobbying and political network of Charles and David Koch, bogeymen to Democrats for years, is poised for a significant policy win — but it will come at the expense of fellow conservatives on Capitol Hill.

Their victory also could derail a policy goal they share with those same Republican lawmakers: a permanent comprehensive overhaul of the nation’s tax code.

Senators Warn FCC, Trump Administration About Freedom of the Press
Comes after CQ Roll Call reporter was pinned against a wall while covering the commission

Iowa Sen. Charles E. Grassley says it is customary for reporters to question public officials after meetings, as he is seen doing here. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Senators, including Judiciary Chairman Charles E. Grassley, are warning the Federal Communications Commission about its treatment of reporters after a CQ Roll Call reporter was manhandled Thursday.

“The Federal Communications Commission needs to take a hard look at why this happened and make sure it doesn’t happen again. As The Washington Post pointed out, it’s standard operating procedure for reporters to ask questions of public officials after meetings and news conferences,” the Iowa Republican said. “It happens all day, every day. There’s no good reason to put hands on a reporter who’s doing his or her job.”  

Republican National Committee Raises $9.6 Million in April
$51 million raised overall

Republican National Committee Chairwoman Ronna Romney McDaniel cited enthusiasm for President Donald Trump for the committee raising $9.6 million in April. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

The Republican National Committee announced it raised $9.6 million in April, bringing the committee’s haul to $51 million for 2017.

The committee also announced it had $41.4 million in cash on hand and has spent $9.5 million this year in disbursements.

Report: Trump Told Russians Comey Firing Relieved ‘Great Pressure’
Close WH aide to president allegedly a person of interest to FBI

President Donald Trump walks toward Marine One before departing from the White House on April 28. Two reports out Friday allege he told Russian officials firing FBI Director James Comey helped him, and that a close aide is a person of interest in a FBI probe of the 2016 election. (Mark Wilson/Getty Images)

President Trump reportedly told senior Russian officials that firing FBI Director James Comey relieved “great pressure” on him because of allegations of nefarious ties between his campaign and Russia. And another report places a senior White House official as a “person of interest” in the bureau’s ongoing investigation.

“I just fired the head of the FBI. He was crazy, a real nut job,” the New York Times reported Friday, citing a document that summarizes his Oval Office meeting earlier this month with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and Moscow’s ambassador to Washington.

Having Fun With the Health Care Bill Holdup
Hoyer needles McCarthy about delay in sending House bill to Senate

House Minority Whip Steny H. Hoyer had some fun with Republican delays in transmitting their health care measure to the Senate. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

House Minority Leader Steny H. Hoyer had a little fun with his Republican colleagues’ delay in transmitting their health care overhaul legislation to the Senate.

“You can imagine my shock, chagrin and surprise when I learned yesterday that bill has not gone to the Senate. Apparently it’s gone from one chair to the other chair in the desks before me,” the Maryland Democrat needled House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., in their colloquy on the floor Friday. He asked McCarthy if there would need to be another vote on the bill and when it will be sent to the Senate.

Photos of the Week: Lawmakers Reel and Run
The Week of May 15 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

Arizona Sen. John McCain talks with reporters on Wednesday after a vote in the Capitol about whether a special prosecutor is needed to investigate President Donald Trump’s alleged ties to Russia. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

BY BILL CLARK AND TOM WILLIAMS

The House returned Tuesday after a one-week recess to a Washington reeling from new allegations related to the firing of FBI Director James B. Comey and revelations that the president shared classified information with Russian officials in the Oval Office. 

Resources Request From Comey Disputed
Rosenstein: No evidence Comey asked for additional resources

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein leaves the Capitol after briefing the House of Representatives on the firing of former FBI Director James Comey and the investigation into Russia's interference in the 2016 campaign on Friday, May 19, 2017. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By REMA RAHMAN and LINDSEY McPHERSON

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein told members of the House Friday that he had no evidence former FBI Director James Comey asked for more resources before his firing.

Weiner Pleads Guilty to Transferring Obscene Material to Minor
Former congressman faces up to 10 years in prison

Former Democratic Rep. Anthony Weiner leaves federal court in Manhattan after pleading guilty in sexting case on Friday to charges of transmitting sexual material to a minor. (Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images)

Former Democratic Rep. Anthony Weiner pleaded guilty Friday to a single charge of transferring obscene material to a minor in a plea deal with the U.S. attorney’s office in Manhattan. 

Weiner faces a sentence of up to 10 years, which a judge will decide at a sentencing hearing in September. He will also have to register as a sex offender.