April 16, 2014

Policy Briefings: Defense Sequester

Nobody seems to like the automatic Pentagon spending cuts set for January, but there is little Congressional agreement on an alternative.

Forbes: Sequester Would Cripple Security

Before the Budget Control Act was passed in August, the act of being sequestered would have typically referred to a jury in a public trial that has been isolated to avoid being prejudiced by media coverage.

Moran: Smarter Cuts, Higher Taxes

On May 10, the majority party attempted to sacrifice the broad role of the federal government in improving the lives of low- and middle-income American families in order to spare the Department of Defense from the effects of sequestration for one year.

Hartzler: Defense Is Our First Obligation

The first responsibility of the United States government is to provide for the common defense — protecting the safety and liberty of American citizens from threats at home and abroad.

Bordallo: ‘Balance’ Is Key to Defense Deal

The current political environment and fiscal challenges in Washington, D.C., have made it difficult to pass even routine legislation. Although partisan gridlock is nothing new, an aversion to compromise is defining this Congress, which has been tasked with reducing the largest federal deficit since World War II.

Thornberry: Reject the Meat-Ax Approach

Much of the future is hazy and unknowable. But we can discern certain trends, and we can take steps to ensure that we are as prepared as possible to meet uncertainty.

Honda: Cut Defense, but Not Like This

House Republicans’ passage of the Sequester Replacement Reconciliation Act, H.R. 5652, should not come as a surprise, given their inability to craft a balanced and sustainable solution to reduce the deficit.