Sept. 22, 2014 SIGN IN | REGISTER

Technology & Science Archive

Millennials to the FCC: 'Don't Break the Internet' | Commentary

Bureaucrats in Washington are trying to use a law passed in 1934 to take over the Internet. The Federal Communications Commission wants to unlawfully use a provision known as “Title II” to regulate the Internet as a public utility.

Science Funding -- Do We Know What We Get for Our Money? | Commentary

With the exception of one-time stimulus funding, our national investment in fundamental research has flat-lined since the Bush years. But there’s more to the story than research spending.

It's Time for the FCC to Call Off Its Convoluted Power Grab | Commentary

A potential heavy-handed federal power grab is threatening the fabric of constitutional federalism, and Congress is divided on whether to interfere.

Keep the Internet Free of Taxes | Commentary

Congress has fewer than 50 days to permanently extend the Internet Tax Freedom Act and prevent an unnecessary and detrimental tax from being inflicted on the American people.

Keeping the Internet Open and Free | Commentary

From Eastern Europe to the South China Sea, to Northern Iraq and Syria, the West’s post-war world order faces challenges today that were unimaginable two decades ago.

Policies of the Future Should Not Be Tied to Science of the Past | Commentary

Fighting the last war over again is a bad strategy for future military planning. Using science of the past in crafting technology policies for the future is just as foolish. Yet that’s what’s happening in the debate over refilling the Highway Trust Fund’s depleted financial tank.

Behind the Red Carpet | Commentary

I’m in Washington this week to attend Behind the Red Carpet, an event hosted by Rep. Judy Chu, D-Calif., co-chairwoman of the Creative Rights Caucus. The event aims to bring the story — and the people — behind our film and television productions to lawmakers on the Hill. As we tell our personal stories in Washington, D.C., we also hope to share some of the greatest concerns facing our industry today.

Parties Spar Over Municipal Broadband Issues

On the issue of municipal broadband, the opposing sides are focused on the Federal Communications Commission and not Congress, but it’s still a topic that’s come up on the Hill, including during hearings, in letters to the FCC and on the House floor.

story blurb thumbnail

Cities Ask FCC to Fight Restrictive Broadband Laws

Chattanooga, Tenn., and Wilson, N.C., are among a number of cities and towns that provide their own municipal broadband networks. About 20 states, depending on whom you ask, have laws that restrict them in some fashion.

Conservatives Should Support "Local Choice" Reform

Here’s an interesting political trivia question: “What was the only veto of President George H.W. Bush to be overridden by Congress?” The answer is the 1992 Cable Act.

Congress Should Reject EU Attacks on Internet Freedom | Commentary

European lawmakers and regulators will tell you that their recent adventures into Internet regulation are aimed at upholding a “fundamental human right” to privacy. They’ll claim the right to be forgotten is not a “super right” trumping other fundamental rights. But in their headlong rush to protect Internet users from themselves, they’ve done just that and downgraded other fundamental human rights like the right to free expression.

E-Rate Brought Classroom Internet Up by 80 Percent

The Federal Communications Commission’s E-Rate program is formally known as the Universal Service Program for Schools and Libraries . It was created under the 1996 Telecommunications Act and is administered through the Universal Service Administrative Company, an independent, not-for-profit corporation.

Funding Shake-Up May Change Subsidies for Internet Access in Schools, Libraries

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler’s plan to shake up the E-Rate program of federal subsidies for Internet service in public schools and libraries has only partly been successful — his FCC colleagues have agreed to make more money available for Wi-Fi, as Wheeler proposed in June, but only if the money isn’t needed for basic Internet connections.

Congress Should Agree on Allowing a Third National Wireless Carrier | Commentary

Already this year, we’ve seen announcements of two major transactions in the media and telecommunications space: Comcast announced plans to acquire Time Warner Cable, and AT&T announced plans to acquire DirecTV. Congress has begun weighing in on these transactions and, if recent press reports are to be believed, they will soon have an opportunity to review the long-rumored merger of Sprint and T-Mobile. It is this third proposed transaction that is most interesting because it carries the potential of a policy dilemma for both Republicans and Democrats in Congress.

Rural America: The Forefront of Innovation | Commentary

The productivity and growth of rural America are essential to the overall economic well-being and prosperity of our country. These regions are critical to our sustainability and should not be neglected when considering policies that promote job creation, investment and innovation. While Ohio’s 5th District boasts more than 60,000 manufacturing jobs, it is also the largest agricultural district in the state. Ensuring our rural areas are accounted for, especially when examining ways to tap our country’s technological potential, must be a top priority.

Prescott Grant May Leave Marine Mammals Stranded | Commentary

At Tuesday’s congressional briefing on marine mammal strandings, Congressmen William Keating, D-Mass., and Jared Huffman, D-Calif., spoke to approximately 80 congressional staffers and others about how crucial The John H. Prescott Marine Mammal Rescue Assistance Grant Program is for conducting important marine mammal rescue work and government-mandated research not only for their states, but nationwide.

After Aereo, the Cloud Comes Under Scrutiny

Discussions of the Aereo case on broadcast copyrights often include references to the Cablevision court case in 2008 and its importance to “cloud” computing.

Court's Aereo Decision Narrow Enough for Some, Continues to Raise Questions for Others

When the Supreme Court ruled last month that the television streaming service Aereo had violated the copyrights of major broadcasters, the justices also cautioned that their ruling was limited in nature.

'Assault on Science' Tired Partisan Rhetoric | Commentary

A June 24 Roll Call op-ed, “The Far Right’s Assault on Science Won’t Help Economy” made numerous unfounded charges against Republicans on the House Science Committee. While the author attempts to come across as an independent observer, his allegations are tired partisan rhetoric.

The Far Right's Assault on Science Won't Help Economy | Commentary

It wasn’t too many years ago that the Environmental Protection Agency came under fire for promulgating regulations that critics claimed had insufficient scientific validity. The pendulum now seems to have swung the other way, if a policy provision in the “Department of Energy Research and Development Act of 2014” is any indicator.

SIGN IN




OR

SUBSCRIBE

Want Roll Call on your doorstep?