March 27, 2015 SIGN IN | REGISTER

Legal Affairs Archive

Supreme Court May Hear Texas Case Again

The Supreme Court is set to decide soon whether justices will again hear the case of Abigail Noel Fisher, a white student who was denied admission to the University of Texas-Austin. The court first dealt with the case two years ago, sending it back to the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals.

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Affirmative Action Thrives at Most Selective Colleges

Colleges across the country are trying to diversify their freshman classes, but are doing so on an ever-changing legal terrain about whether, and to what extent, they may consider race in admissions policy.

Home Visiting Is a Bipartisan Winner for Families and Communities | Commentary

Ask many people in law enforcement about their toughest days, and you’ll hear time and again how upsetting it is to be called to a home where children are being abused or neglected. Sometimes, the signs of violence and oppression come at the hands of adults who are willfully causing harm to their kids. Other times we encounter parents and caregivers who are simply overwhelmed with and unprepared for the stresses of raising young children. In many cases, the families are living in poverty, with parents who don’t have the education or life skills to be productive citizens.

Experienced Lawyers to Argue ACA Case

The Supreme Court will hear one hour of oral arguments starting at 10 a.m. Wednesday on the health care lawsuit, King v. Burwell.

Health Care Exchanges Face Supreme Court Test

President Barack Obama’s health care law is for the second time at risk before the Supreme Court. The justices will hear oral arguments Wednesday in a case that could leave the law unworkable without a legislative fix, and millions of Americans without health insurance.

A Bold Step Forward in Challenging Citizens United | Commentary

Recently, Rep. Keith Ellison, D-Minn., announced bold legislation that will limit corporate felons’ ability to influence our elections. It’s an important step toward undoing the damage of the Supreme Court’s five-year-old Citizens United decision and restoring control over our democracy.

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Identity Theft: Is a Federal Standard Really the Answer?

Lawmakers are restarting a long-running effort to enact a single federal law specifying when consumers should be notified when their credit cards, Social Security numbers or other personal information has been hacked or compromised.

5 Years after the Spill: What BP Owes the Gulf Coast | Commentary

It’s been nearly five years since BP slimed the Gulf Coast, taking the lives of 11 men, wrecking livelihoods and killing tens of thousands of helpless coastal birds. Finally, federal Judge Carl Barbier is heading into the final stretch, deciding how much the third largest oil company in the world will have to pay in pollution fines for the worst oil spill in U.S. history.

Time for the ECPA to Get an '80s-Style Remake | Commentary

The 1980s were a decade to remember. Advancements in the ’80s became the foundation for many of the technologies that have become a part of our daily lives — wireless phones, video game consoles and, of course, the foundations of the Internet. And just like our favorite ’80s TV shows are remade into new movies (such as “Transformers” and “The A-Team”) let’s add a 28-year-old online privacy law deserving of a remake too: the Electronic Communications Privacy Act.

How Congress Can Protect Americans' Email Privacy | Commentary

Did you lock your front door when you left for work this morning? Rest easy, then, knowing your papers are secure. But what about your emails? Not so much. Because right now, an outdated law threatens the Fourth Amendment protections of every American who uses the Internet. Whether you are a committee chairman or an unpaid intern, your digital privacy is currently at risk.

Boehner Plans to Authorize House Suit Against Obama Over Immigration

House Republican leaders are finalizing a plan that would authorize the chamber to take legal actions against President Barack Obama over his executive actions on immigration.

White House Body-Camera Grant Modeled on Lapsed DOJ Program

The White House proposal for new grants to help police buy body-worn cameras is modeled on an existing bulletproof-vest grant program, a senior administration official said when the community-policing plan was unveiled in December.

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Democrats Plan Police Body-Camera Legislation

Two similar Democratic proposals to equip more police officers with body-worn cameras should come into better focus within days, as details emerge on a White House initiative as well as a prominent African-American lawmaker’s legislation in the House.

Guantanamo Will Be Closed Before Obama's Term Ends, Ex-Official Predicts

The former State Department official charged with closing the Guantánamo Bay detention facility predicted over the weekend that President Barack Obama will keep his promise to shutter the prison before ending his term.

Would You Like a Patent Lawsuit With Your Meal? | Commentary

As members of Congress prepare to re-open the debate on patent reform, they would do well to consider they have probably recently eaten food. They might have looked up recipes or pictures of that food online. They may even have counted the calories in that food, or used a website to help figure out how healthy their meal was.

Fear-Mongering About Foreign Patent Trolls | Commentary

As was highlighted at the recent nomination hearing for Michelle Lee as the next director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office it is important to take a look at the patent landscape and the talk of more legislative action on our patent system under discussion in Congress.

Feinstein Plans to Push for New Laws Stemming from CIA Torture Report

Senate Intelligence Committee Chairwoman Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., plans to push for fresh legislation stemming from her panel's report into the CIA's post-9/11 detainee interrogation practices, but she'll likely face an uphill climb because even Republicans sympathetic to criticisms of the CIA’s methods say there are no need for new laws.

Senate Report Tests U.S. State-Secrets Defense

The Senate’s report on CIA interrogation practices is poised to become a new weapon in legal proceedings for former and current detainees, both in the United States and foreign courts.

CIA Report Leaves Open Questions About White House Knowledge

The blockbuster report on CIA interrogation practices after 9/11 from the Senate Intelligence Committee confirmed reports and answered scores of lingering questions about the Bush-era policies. But the report doesn’t provide a definitive accounting of exactly what detail White House staff knew about the program, and when they knew it.

Former House Members Unite to Curb Federal Prison Growth | Commentary

In recent years, public awareness of our nation’s overcrowded and inefficient state prisons has grown considerably. But what is often overlooked is this country’s bloated federal prison system, which continues to operate beyond capacity, endangering staff and inmates alike and costing taxpayers nearly $7 billion in fiscal 2014. That’s one-quarter of the Justice Department’s entire budget. Although the federal prison population recently decreased for the first time in more than three decades, we are far from declaring victory.

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