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Health Care Archive

Experienced Lawyers to Argue ACA Case

The Supreme Court will hear one hour of oral arguments starting at 10 a.m. Wednesday on the health care lawsuit, King v. Burwell.

Health Care Exchanges Face Supreme Court Test

President Barack Obama’s health care law is for the second time at risk before the Supreme Court. The justices will hear oral arguments Wednesday in a case that could leave the law unworkable without a legislative fix, and millions of Americans without health insurance.

Affordable Dental Health Care for Veterans, Children and Others Should Be a Right | Commentary

As our national focus remains firmly trained on health care, there remains an important element that has long been overlooked — oral health. Millions of low-income children and adults go each year without seeing a dentist. As many as 1 in 3 Americans do not have dental coverage. One in 4 adults age 65 and older have lost all of their teeth.

Working Together: The Only Approach to Prescription Abuse | Commentary

Prescription drug abuse is a pervasive public health problem that transcends age and ZIP code. No one sets out to be an addict and every person has a unique story — a grandmother with chronic pain who slowly and unwittingly becomes dependent on her medication, the teenager who steals from a parent’s medicine cabinet and misuses or even sells their medicines, or the war veteran who simply seeks to overcome incomprehensible pain that never stops.

Disney Measles Outbreak Set Off Public Alarm

It took the magic of Disney to get the public truly alarmed about an uptick in measles, which had already been a worry for infectious-disease specialists, said Paul Offit, an author and the director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia.

As Debate Over Measles Vaccine Takes Center Stage, Lawmakers, Health Experts Experience Deja Vu

The challenges for Congress in confronting a renewed domestic threat of measles seem like an unfortunate case of déjà vu to a former lawmaker who had great influence on the American health care system in recent decades.

You Shouldn't Have to Be Lucky to Get Paid Sick Days | Commentary

Everyone gets sick, from the common cold to a more serious illness. Recently, my 15-year-old daughter called me after school to tell me she had a bad headache and sore throat. Because my employer provides paid sick days, I was able to leave in the middle of the afternoon and take my daughter for a strep and flu test — no questions asked and no pay docked. Every parent should be able to be there for his or her sick child and have the same level of trust and economic stability that I do.

The Government Can Save Lives, Right Now | Commentary

Right now, British and American scientists have developed techniques to prevent life threatening and incurable diseases that affect tens of thousands of people around the world. And this week, the Parliament of the United Kingdom voted to pass regulations that will bring clinics one step closer to performing this technique, mitochondrial replacement therapy. Yet, for the more than 12,000 women with mitochondrial diseases in the United States at risk of having children with mitochondrial diseases, they face a ban on this lifeline to have healthy children. This issue, so critical to public health, is being half ignored, half slighted by Congress, the president and the relevant agencies. This is Washington gridlock at its worst, and it has to stop.

TSCA Reform Should Embrace the Best Application of Toxicological Science -- a Perspective From its Practitioners | Commentary

The federal law governing chemicals used in commerce in the United States affects every person and business, but few are aware of its importance to their lives or that it is outdated and in serious need of modernization.

Building on Momentum to Improve Mental Health Services for Nation's Veterans

In the movie, “American Sniper,” we learn of the complexity of the invisible injuries of war U.S. Navy SEAL Chris Kyle experienced. What weighed on his conscience is that he couldn’t save more of the troops with whom he served. After taking time to understand what bothered him, his Department of Veterans Affairs doctor realized that helping other veterans would be therapeutic for Kyle.

Change the Trajectory of Alzheimer's or Bankrupt Medicare | Commentary

This is the price tag: $20.8 trillion. Because there is currently no way to stop or slow Alzheimer’s, that’s what we will all pay over the next generation to care for people with Alzheimer’s unless policymakers change the disease’s trajectory by adequately funding research for treatment.

Message to Congress: Restoring National Institutes of Health Funding Should Be Top Priority

Cracking the genetic code is arguably the greatest life science research triumph of the last century. Thanks to our country’s investments in basic and clinical research over several decades, America now leads the world in harnessing the genetic code to understand, prevent and cure disease.

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Heritage to Offer Conservative Budget Blueprint

More than 100 cost-savings proposals, due out from the Heritage Foundation on Thursday, could provide ammunition for conservative lawmakers in coming debates over restructuring entitlement programs, addressing the post-sequester discretionary spending caps, reauthorizing the Highway Trust Fund and raising the debt limit.

Now Is the Time for Action on Children's Health | Commentary

Timing is everything, they say. And when it comes to extending federal funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program, it’s absolutely true.

Some E-Cigarette Makers Support a Ban

E-cigarette companies took a beating from Senate Democrats at a hearing last year focused on their marketing practices, but LOGIC Technology President Miguel Martin said some brands — such as his own — are taking steps to be responsible.

Democrats Renew Press for Curbs on E-Cigarettes

Democrats are renewing efforts to protect children from the potential harm of electronic cigarettes, but the main event will come on the regulatory front if the Food and Drug Administration meets expectations and releases a final rule this year.

How New Orleans Ended Veteran Homelessness | Commentary

In New Orleans, we are all too familiar with the feeling of homelessness. After Hurricane Katrina, literally all of us were without a home.

Doctors Know: Abortion Is Safe and Must Remain Legal | Commentary

Having grown up in Washington, D.C., I know all too well what it means when quality health care options are too few and far between. Communities such as the one I grew up in experience higher rates of chronic medical problems and decreased access to health care. These racial and ethnic disparities include disproportionately increased unintended pregnancy rates and higher rates of maternal and infant mortality. These experiences shaped me as an individual and led me toward a career in women’s health.

Why Is the United States Last in Valuing Families? | Commentary

The most economically advanced nation on Earth is in some ways one of the most primitive.

Protecting Medical Innovation Strengthens Economy, Improves Lives | Commentary

Just after the November elections, Gallup polled the American people and asked them what they need Congress to do. Here are the top priorities they shared: Listen to the people; represent the people; and work together to get things done, create jobs/employment and bring jobs home and improve health care.

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