May 29, 2015 SIGN IN | REGISTER

Health Care

Marijuana Foes, Friends Agree on Need for Research

House appropriators have a bipartisan curiosity about pot.

Congress Flatlines VA Construction Budget

Congressional consternation with the Department of Veterans Affairs’ handling of large construction projects has been stewing for some time, and 2015 appears to be the year lawmakers intend to put their feet down.

Deadline Puts Focus on Denver VA Hospital Project

As if Congress doesn’t have enough to do before its Memorial Day recess, Veterans Affairs Secretary Robert McDonald has warned lawmakers that unless they authorize more money by next week for building the new veterans hospital in Denver, the project will probably come to a halt.

Protecting the Hours and Wages of Restaurant Employees | Commentary

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act — now known to most Americans as Obamacare — is a law littered with unintended consequences. Perhaps the most egregious is the number of part-time employees seeing their hours and wages cut as employers scramble to comply with the law’s employer mandate.

FDA's Mandate Gets More Complicated

The Food and Drug Administration is tweaking the way it evaluates medical devices at a time when the agency finds itself at the center of a wide range of pressing health issues, from food safety to drug formulation and policing the pharmaceuticals supply chain.

FDA Releases Framework for Considering Patient Experiences in Its Medical-Device Reviews

For decades, the Food and Drug Administration and the medical device industry have puzzled over how to factor the experiences of patients when making regulatory decisions. This month, they got some answers.

Why All Methods of FDA-Approved Birth Control Must Be Covered by Insurance | Commentary

Over the past few years, millions of women have gone to the pharmacy to fill their birth control prescription, or visited the doctor to have an intrauterine device inserted, and learned their birth control is fully covered, without a copayment. Some of these women used to pay hundreds of dollars a year out-of-pocket for birth control. But among the Affordable Care Act’s dramatic advancements for women’s preventive health is a provision that requires insurance companies to cover birth control without a copay.

Act Like Young Lives Are At Stake | Commentary

Recently, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention grabbed headlines with eye-popping figures on use of e-cigarettes by middle school- and high school-age children from their National Youth Tobacco Survey. The survey found that e-cigarette use among high school students tripled in the last year. It isn’t every day that the public takes note of trends in youth tobacco use. So it would be a shame if the Obama administration didn’t take some courage from that concern and attention.

Medical Billing System Rollout Date Is Elusive

The American Hospital Association and America’s Health Insurance Plans have pushed to stick with the current plan for implementing the ICD-10 billing system. Many organizations began working toward the conversion of codes years ago. An initial target date for ICD-10 was October 2011, which was then pushed to October 2013. The date was delayed to October 2014, which was most recently kicked to October 2015.

Lawmakers May Let October Medical-Code Deadline Stick

The United States appears poised to join much of the developed world in switching over to a system of medical billing codes that was adopted in France, the United Kingdom, Australia and Germany more than a decade ago.

Vote Study Shows Obama Gets His Way in GOP-Controlled Senate

Republicans took the Senate in 2014 by stressing the data that CQ Roll Call’s presidential support vote study revealed: Democrats in red states were sticking close to President Barack Obama. So here’s a surprise: the new GOP majority in 2015 is voting Obama’s way as often as they ever have.

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Path Forward on Lynch Nomination Tied to Abortion Language

Senators negotiated Wednesday over how to end a legislative standoff that has stalled votes on an otherwise noncontroversial anti-human trafficking bill as well as the nomination of Loretta Lynch, President Barack Obama’s pick for attorney general.

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Vote on Lynch Nomination Possible--With a Big 'If'

Loretta Lynch’s bid to be the next attorney general remains mired in Senate politics, but Republicans offered a proposal Tuesday that could lift a major hurdle to a floor vote on her nomination.

Military Construction-VA Appropriations by the Numbers

House appropriators unveiled a spending bill this week for military construction and veterans programs that would fall short of what the president wants, but would boost spending over the current level.

Appropriations Markup Puts GOP in Tough Position Of Balancing Defense, Veterans Spending

The Military Construction and Veterans Affairs bill House appropriators planned to mark up Wednesday clearly illustrates the dilemma of Republican congressional leaders this year in trying to hold the line or reduce spending while not shortchanging their most sacrosanct areas of government — national defense and the care of veterans.

Ted Cruz Wants to Use Religion to Discriminate in Our Nation's Capital | Commentary

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.

Who Foots the Bill for Graduate Medical Expenses?

Teaching hospitals and ambulatory settings in the United States are responsible for training physicians after they complete medical school, through several years of hands-on residency programs in various areas of medicine. Because they rack up significant expenses in training these residents, teaching hospitals receive some additional funds from other sources to cover the costs.

Teaching Hospitals May Benefit From Schumer's Likely Ascension in Leadership

Teaching hospitals have an ally in New York Sen. Charles E. Schumer and are likely to benefit if, as expected, he becomes the Senate’s next Democratic leader.

Conservatives Push for Fully Paid 'Doc Fix' Deal

Momentum is building among conservative senators to scrap an exemption from budget laws in the House-passed "doc fix" deal, a move that would pressure Congress to offset $141 billion of the package's cost not currently paid for later this year, outside groups say.

Racing to Better Health in Oklahoma City | Commentary

When the clock struck noon on April 22, 1889, approximately 50,000 people raced to claim settlements across 2 million open acres comprising present-day Oklahoma. By the time the sun set that evening, the population of Oklahoma City had gone from zero to 10,000 and was on its way to becoming the capital of our great state.

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