Aug. 31, 2015 SIGN IN | REGISTER

Health Care

Doctors May Shun Patients After Medicaid Compensation Cuts

Starting this month many doctors who were likely to expand basic medical care offered to low-income Americans — a goal of the 2010 health care law — could see Medicaid fees drop an average of almost 43 percent.

Innovation Deficit Threatens America's Health and Prosperity | Commentary

In the center of the country there’s a quiet revolution taking place that holds great promise for our nation, though only if we address the growing innovation deficit facing America.

Budget Reconciliation Through the Years

Congress has employed budget reconciliation to enact dozens of laws, addressing issues that range from tax cuts to student loans.

Budget Reconciliation May Be Obamacare's Enemy

Democrats used the complicated process of budget reconciliation to pass part of President Barack Obama’s health care legislation in 2010, and avoid a Senate filibuster; now Republicans are weighing whether to use the same process to chip away at the law.

GMO Labeling, Misleading and Costly for Consumers | Commentary

Activists pushing for mandated labeling of genetically modified (GM) foods are really pushing a disingenuous political agenda that will be both confusing and costly for consumers.

A Health Care Agenda for the New Congress Beyond "Repeal Obamacare" | Commentary

With Republicans now controlling both chambers of Congress, no law will come under more scrutiny than Obamacare.

Republican Party Has a Mandate to Lead

Republicans returned to Washington this week to open the 114th Congress with their largest majorities in nearly a century. This is great news.

A Prescription That No Pharmacist Ever Sees | Commentary

Secretary of Health and Human Services Sylvia Mathews Burwell recently said the administration wants to address difficulties faced by consumers following the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. A good starting point is a provision that’s costing consumers and needlessly burdening doctors, which has received bipartisan support for change.

From Aid to Impact: Supporting U.S. Foreign Assistance | Commentary

What impact is U.S. investment in foreign aid having in far off, foreign countries? In D.C., we receive statistics about the impact of aid, but never get a face or a name of those affected by our help. Traveling to Cambodia, the largest single beneficiary of U.S. aid in maternal and neonatal health, changed that. That’s where we met Navy, a 30-year-old woman who lives with her 6-year-old daughter, Davin in Phnom Penh.

Protecting America's Clean Drinking Water | Commentary

The causes and consequences of the hottest year on record, which is now shaping up to be 2014 according to the World Meteorological Organization and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, are likely to have a lasting impact on New York State and New York City’s pristine water supply if we’re not careful. And while we’re glad that the Water for the World Act of 2014 cleared Congress recently, which improves access to water worldwide, the problem of water scarcity remains a serious issue in America.

It's Time for the Affordable Care Act to Make Care Affordable | Commentary

The Affordable Care Act has expanded coverage to millions. But a recent Gallup survey found that 1 in 3 Americans still put off needed health care this year because it cost too much.

Health Reform Without Deception | Commentary

Recently, MIT professor Jonathan Gruber apologized before Congress for the litany of controversial comments he made regarding the creation and implementation of Obamacare. But even after the apology, we still don’t know how much of the health care law was based on willful deception and how much was an honest effort at real reform.

Service Members, Spouses and Veterans Often Need a New Kind of College Education | Commentary

When the newly elected Congress convenes, it will consider two seemingly unrelated issues: funding a new military involvement in the Middle East and reauthorizing the Higher Education Act, which governs student aid.

Retired Military Leaders: School Nutrition Supports National Security | Letter to the Editor

I applaud Melinda Bonner’s efforts to make healthier school meals work in her district (Congress: Don’t Turn Back the Clock on Healthy School Meals, Roll Call, Dec. 4). As a retired general from Alabama, I would like to add that improved school nutrition is also important for our future national security.

A Do-Something Congress | Commentary

As this lame-duck Congress limps to the end of its tenure, pundits are shouting about its ineffectiveness. The 113th Congress passed fewer laws than any Congress in 60 years. With control of the government still divided along party lines, many see little hope the next Congress will be any better.

Murray Announces Intent to Take HELP

Patty Murray confirmed Friday that she plans to succeed Tom Harkin as the top Democrat on the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee next year, where she is expected to play a prominent role defending the health care law and trying to forge compromises on stalled education policy.

Containing Epidemics Like Ebola: Lessons From Nigeria's Success | Commentary

For the sake of public health preparedness here in the United States, as well as humanitarian assistance in West Africa, Congress should approve President Barack Obama’s request for $6.18 billion in emergency funding to combat Ebola.

The Surgeon General Nominee Doesn't Make the Grade | Commentary

Many Democrats are hoping to use their last days of Senate control to install President Barack Obama’s nominee for surgeon general, Dr. Vivek Murthy. The young doctor has been awaiting confirmation since the president tapped him for the post last November. And this week is the chamber’s last opportunity to act before the GOP majority takes the helm in January.

Congress Must Pass the ABLE Act | Commentary

With the lame-duck session set to wrap-up this week, the clock is ticking for Congress to rise above Washington gridlock and give millions of Americans with disabilities a chance for a better financial future.

Ebola: Who Bears the Cost of Keeping Us Safe? | Commentary

The Ebola virus, which has now touched our shores and taken the lives of two victims in the U.S., is a threat lethal enough to demand full mobilization of our health care resources, which is what federal officials have urged. Consequently, hospitals in recent weeks have been arming themselves with the necessary knowledge, supplies and resources to confront the danger and ensure it is contained and managed skillfully.

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