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Executive Branch Archive

Battle Over FCC's Net Neutrality Rules May Redefine Free Speech

The Federal Communications Commission’s defense of its rules regulating broadband services in court has a free speech element that could have wide implications for how the Internet should function and consumers’ access to online content.

The Volkswagen Emissions Scandal and the EPA | Commentary

In a monumental admission of automotive fraud, Volkswagen’s Chief Executive Martin Winterkorn resigned on Sept. 30 amid revelations that millions of VWs were built to cheat on clean air tests.

Outside Influences Seek to Sway House GOP Leadership Races

Conservative activists are mobilizing to sway the House GOP leadership contests, as K Street lobbyists say they are quietly offering their own counsel and behind-the-scenes help to favored contenders.

Volkswagen Emissions Scandal Is a Noxious Problem for Congress, Industry and Regulators

An examination into whether Volkswagen misled consumers when it dodged emissions standards could provide Republicans and Democrats in Congress another chance to unite in criticism of automakers evading regulations.

House GOP Civil War Takes to the Airwaves

Just two days after House Speaker John A. Boehner stunned Washington by announcing he will leave Congress next month, two top members of his House Republican conference traded barbs in a remarkably public display of internal dissent on a Sunday network news show.

McCarthy Profile: Genial Party Loyalist Rose Quickly

Speaker John A. Boehner's resignation at the end of October makes his top deputy, Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy of California, the likeliest candidate to inherit the gavel. Boehner even offered his unqualified endorsement, saying the five-term lawmaker would be an "excellent" speaker.

Boehner Profile: Achievements and Pitfalls Mark Recent Years

Speaker John A. Boehner's stunning announcement Friday that he will resign from his House seat next month caps a 25-year career marked by legislative victories and intra-party conflicts. 

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Boehner to Call It Quits; McCarthy Seen as Successor

Speaker John A. Boehner told fellow Republicans Friday morning he will resign from Congress and give up his House seat at the end of October, according to members.

Path Toward 'Clean' Spending Stopgap Bill Emerges

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Thursday began laying the groundwork for the chamber to advance a “clean” continuing resolution in the coming days after Democrats and some Republicans banded together to block consideration of a stopgap with Planned Parenthood defunding language.

Pope Francis Hails Immigrants at White House

Pope Francis needed less than a minute into his first public remarks on U.S. soil Wednesday to invoke the contributions of immigrants to building America, setting the stage for more to come when he addresses Congress.

Huelskamp Expects Abortion, 'Sanctity of Unborn' in Papal Address

Rep. Tim Huelskamp, an outspoken Kansas Republican who spent two years in a Catholic seminary, expects Pope Francis to address abortion and the “sanctity of the unborn” when he speaks to Congress on Thursday.

Vatican Eschews K Street But Has Ear of Congress

Pope Francis' arrival in the nation’s capital next week will spark plenty of lobbying, but the Holy See itself hasn’t converted to the rituals of K Street.

Congress Fails to Keep Up With Rapid Technology Advances

After the Office of Personnel Management announced in July that hackers had accessed the personal information about more than 21 million Americans who’d applied for government security clearances or served as references, it gave a boost to long-stalled Senate legislation that aims to do something about cybersecurity.

Jesuit Ties to Pope Francis Provide Rep. Vargas With Insight

When Rep. Juan C. Vargas attends Pope Francis’ address to Congress next week, it won’t be his first time in the pontiff’s presence.

Too Many Judges, State Department Says of Clinton Emails

The government asked a federal court Thursday to assign to a single judge the cases involving Hillary Rodham Clinton's use of a private email server during her stint as secretary of State.

Iran Filibuster Vote Too Close to Call

The White House looks certain to be able to sustain a veto of any resolution of disapproval that Congress sends President Barack Obama. But it's quite possible no such legislation reaches his desk. 

11 Senators to Watch in Iran Debate

CQ Roll Call took a look at how each of the 11 undecided senators may come out on the Iran nuclear deal and whether the agreement should be filibustered. The assessment is based on the senators' legislative histories, statements, re-election prospects and constituent concerns.

Iran Deal Divides Public, Poll Finds

Roughly half of Americans believe Charles E. Schumer, as the No. 3 Democrat in the Senate, can and should oppose the Iran nuclear deal brokered by the Obama administration, compared to only 21 percent who believe the New York Democrat should hold his fire on the agreement.

Kansas Delegation Balks at Plans to Move Gitmo Detainees to Leavenworth

Pentagon officials traveled last week to Fort Leavenworth in Kansas, home to the military’s only domestic maximum-security prison, to evaluate it as a potential alternative to the detention facility at Guantánamo Bay, a Defense Department spokesman said Monday.

Shortcut for Budget Reconciliation Mulled by GOP Leaders

GOP leaders are considering an abbreviated form of the powerful budget reconciliation process this year, giving them the leeway to focus on other pressing matters while still issuing a prod to the president on the health care law.




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