April 19, 2014 SIGN IN | REGISTER

Executive Branch Archive

Senate Confirmation Process Goes 'Nuclear,' but Some Burdens Remain | Commentary

Individuals nominated for executive or judicial branch positions will now have a very different road to confirmation than those in the past. While the road to confirmation has gotten much smoother for some, effective navigation is still needed to avoid the many obstacles that could force a nomination or appointment off course. Nothing the Senate achieved this past month reduces the burden placed on those going through the vetting process.

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Subdued Obama Hopes for Better 2014

After the toughest year of his presidency, Barack Obama on Friday called on Congress to make 2014 “a year of action” and promised to keep pushing for an immigration overhaul, an extension of unemployment benefits and other items.

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Architect of the Capitol Previews Dome Restoration

While climbing the 349 stairs winding between the Crypt and the top of the Capitol Dome, the water leaks that Architect of the Capitol Stephen Ayers aims to halt are evident.

Affordable Care Act Now GPO's Most Popular Digital Document

The rocky rollout of the Affordable Care Act has piqued interest in the text of the bill, according to statistics released by the Government Printing Office.

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Obama's Plans for Adapting to Climate Change Rely On Local Action

The EPA may not have many friends in Congress, but the Obama administration is focused on making them where it counts when it comes to advancing the president’s climate agenda: at the local level.

Red-State Town Follows 'Green' Strategy to Rebuild

Bob Dixson is exactly the sort of local official the White House wants to hear from on climate preparedness.

House Administration Committee Explores Rebranding, Reworking GPO

Rebranding the Government Printing Office as the Government Publishing Office is one strategy that could help the 152-year-old federal agency cope with a changing information landscape.

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Food Service Losses Could Derail Support for Amtrak Subsidies

Florida Republican John L. Mica bristles at the idea of Amtrak partnering with master chefs to upgrade meals on its long-haul trains at a time when the passenger railroad continues to lose tens of millions of dollars a year on its food services.

Federal Efforts to Go Paperless Ignore Seniors' Needs and Digital Divide | Commentary

It’s difficult for many of us to imagine a world without the benefits of technology. As mobile providers revolutionize our daily lives with each new gadget and companies tout the simplicity of e-commerce and social networking, it’s all too easy to forget that this technology is simply not accessible for millions of Americans, especially seniors.

The Department of Justice's Last Stand in the Airline Industry -- Did It Blink? | Commentary

While the American public may not be familiar with the intricacies of antitrust policy, they have direct, and painful, experience with the results of over a decade of lax antitrust enforcement in the airline industry: high fares, little competition and increasing ancillary fees that are the product of a hub system that facilitates tacit, if not overt, collusion amongst the legacy carriers. Against that backdrop, the Department of Justice’s antitrust challenge to American Airlines/US Airways was a breath of fresh air. Finally, we had antitrust enforcement that did not shy away from the tough challenges raised by the increasing consolidation of the airline industry.

Listen to the Factual Record on the ITC, Not the Broken One | Commentary

The International Trade Commission, an independent federal agency that I was fortunate to serve for 12 years, has been much maligned as of late, even derogatorily referred to by some as the “International Trolling Commission” as the patent debates have heated up. These hyperbolic claims by the critics have little relation to the reality of the ITC’s important work as a trade enforcement agency and I feel a sense of duty to my former agency to help sort fact from fiction.

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Congress Looks to Ease Fee Increases for National Forest Cabin Owners

Wading into a dispute over federal land use that dates back to the days of homesteaders and miners, Congress is looking to overhaul the process of assessing fees for private vacation cabins and houses on national forest land.

Milestones in the Recreation Residence Program

Here are some of the milestones in development of the Forest Service’s recreation residence program, which allows private cabins on forest lands:

Goodlatte's Patent Bill Is Two Steps Forward, One Back | Commentary

The House Judiciary Committee, led by Chairman Robert W. Goodlatte, R-Va., is making a well-intentioned play to reform patent litigation by reining in the frivolous and costly lawsuits that all too often act as a roadblock to innovation.

Growing Support for Renewable Packaging and Green Chemistry | Commentary

During a time when partisan politics rule the day, it is sometimes hard for pragmatic bipartisan efforts to cut through the clutter and get the attention they deserve. American workers in the emerging field of renewable chemicals are seeking a level playing field in federal policy, and they’re getting backing from a Democrat from New Jersey and a Republican from Texas.

Patent Reform's Unfinished Business | Commentary

Just two years since the enactment of the America Invents Act, the Obama administration and Republicans and Democrats in Congress are calling for further reforms of the patent system. These calls reflect growing bipartisan recognition that innovators are being increasingly harmed by the abusive behavior of patent trolls, also known as “patent assertion entities” or PAEs.

Park Testimony Was Critical to Tamp Down Interbranch Acrimony | Commentary

The Barack Obama White House made the correct decision when it agreed to allow the administration’s top technology officer, Todd Park, to testify before Congress about troubles with the Obamacare rollout.

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Obama Tries to 'Win Back Some Credibility' With Obamacare Fix (Updated)

A deeply frustrated President Barack Obama moved to quell a growing revolt in his party Thursday morning, announcing an administrative fix that would let health insurance companies extend existing policies for a year.

Democrats Fume at White House Over Affordable Care Act's Troubles

A broken promise, plunging poll ratings and the disastrous start for HealthCare.gov have rattled President Barack Obama’s party, and the impatient rank and file want solutions, not just an apology, from the commander in chief.

Senate Starts Bringing Staffers Up to Speed on Health Exchanges

The Senate offered staffers their first opportunity to interact with DC Health Link representatives Tuesday morning, one day into the four-week open enrollment period.

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