Sept. 3, 2015 SIGN IN | REGISTER

Executive Branch Archive

Congressional Inaction Leaves Military Installations, Communities Stuck at Crossroads | Commentary

Despite action on the National Defense Authorization Act, the threat of sequestration and military spending cuts remain. Missions are being scaled back, force numbers are declining, and communities, states and regions that have long-served as proud homes to our installations continue to take the economic hits.

Cybersecurity Measures Inch Forward, but Critics Doubt Their Effectiveness

Lawmakers are pushing measures they say will help boost the nation’s security from cyber-attacks, but experts warn the efforts will do little to shield the country from increasingly sophisticated online hacking.

story blurb thumbnail

FDA May Lack Money to Carry Out Hiring Envisioned in 'Cures' Bill

The Food and Drug Administration’s ability to hire senior staff would be enhanced under a bipartisan House package to speed new medical cures, but the cash-strapped agency still may not have enough resources to pay higher salaries and support the hiring permitted under the measure.

Chances of Changing Dodd-Frank Appear to Rest With Handful of Moderate Democrats

A handful of moderate Senate Democrats will probably determine whether Congress can pass legislation making the most significant changes to the Dodd-Frank financial overhaul since it was enacted five years ago, in the wake of the economic crisis.

Lawmakers Poised for Fight Over Nuclear Missile Subs

Congress is girding for a showdown over how to pay a looming bill of at least $139 billion for acquiring new nuclear-missile submarines.

Dotcom Act Would Require Deal Review

House Republicans are pushing legislation, known as the Dotcom Act, that aims to give Congress a say in the terms of the handover of the Internet’s address system to international stakeholders.

Sunni Sheikh Comes to Washington Seeking Arms, Aid

Amid the chaos of his home city Ramadi’s fall Sunday to Islamic State fighters, a senior Sunni tribal leader arrived in Washington, D.C., to warn lawmakers and senior administration officials this week of Iran’s growing influence in the war-torn region.

FDA's Mandate Gets More Complicated

The Food and Drug Administration is tweaking the way it evaluates medical devices at a time when the agency finds itself at the center of a wide range of pressing health issues, from food safety to drug formulation and policing the pharmaceuticals supply chain.

story blurb thumbnail

Senate Democrats Put Conditions on Fast-Track Vote

Senate Democrats threatened to block Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s efforts to start debate on a contentious Trade Promotion Authority bill unless the Kentucky Republican guarantees that a customs bill with currency manipulation provisions gets a vote.

story blurb thumbnail

States Aim to Pre-emptively Block Power Plant Regulations

The breadth and complexity of President Barack Obama’s plans to regulate greenhouse gases from power plants are probably a nightmare to some of the many Hill staffers, reporters and interest groups following the issue, but it may be a dream come true for civics teachers.

Clinton Foundation's Missteps Point to Broader Problem

On the surface, the uproar over foreign contributions to the Clinton Foundation while Hillary Rodham Clinton was secretary of State looks like another example of the Clintons behaving badly. But the problem goes beyond the Clintons and could tar Republicans as well.

Congress Must Act to Protect Military Readiness | Commentary

Military readiness and federal regulation of the greater sage grouse — a bird — are not things the average American would consider connected but unless Congress acts, they may well be.

Vote Study Shows Obama Gets His Way in GOP-Controlled Senate

Republicans took the Senate in 2014 by stressing the data that CQ Roll Call’s presidential support vote study revealed: Democrats in red states were sticking close to President Barack Obama. So here’s a surprise: the new GOP majority in 2015 is voting Obama’s way as often as they ever have.

USPTO Patent-Quality Initiative Can Go Further | Commentary

The Senate recently confirmed Michelle Lee — who questioned congressional patent reform efforts — for the top gig at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. At the SXSW festival in March, Lee spoke on the PTO’s patent-quality initiative and upcoming adjustments to the patent system, including better search methods for prior art, crowdsourcing tools to help researchers and enhance overall patent quality, and improved training for PTO examiners.

Congress Should Launch Bipartisan Investigation of 'Short-Sale' Market | Commentary

During his Oscar-nominated cameo in “A History of Violence,” William Hurt declares ominously to the brother he is about to have murdered, “You cost me ... you cost me a helluva lot!” In a much broader sense, and in the real world, the rise of the Regulatory State has cost us a lot; a helluva lot, if you will — in excess of $2 trillion annually, as estimated by Forbes.

Lynch Nomination Fight Intensifies Amid Hints of a Deal

The partisan spat over the stalled Loretta Lynch attorney general nomination heated up Thursday, as did behind-the-scenes Senate negotiations that could allow for her confirmation vote.

story blurb thumbnail

Path Forward on Lynch Nomination Tied to Abortion Language

Senators negotiated Wednesday over how to end a legislative standoff that has stalled votes on an otherwise noncontroversial anti-human trafficking bill as well as the nomination of Loretta Lynch, President Barack Obama’s pick for attorney general.

story blurb thumbnail

Vote on Lynch Nomination Possible--With a Big 'If'

Loretta Lynch’s bid to be the next attorney general remains mired in Senate politics, but Republicans offered a proposal Tuesday that could lift a major hurdle to a floor vote on her nomination.

Military Construction-VA Appropriations by the Numbers

House appropriators unveiled a spending bill this week for military construction and veterans programs that would fall short of what the president wants, but would boost spending over the current level.

So-Called Innovation Act Will Squelch Innovation | Commentary

Three years ago, Congress changed American patent law from a “first to discover” to a “first to file” system. Now, without waiting for these changes to be fully absorbed, some members of Congress are proposing additional changes that would impair the culture of innovation that makes America the place where someone is always trying to build a better mousetrap.

SIGN IN




OR

SUBSCRIBE

Want Roll Call on your doorstep?