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Executive Branch Archive

Address Patent Flaws or Face the Economic Consequences | Commentary

The U.S. became the world’s largest economy, in part, because its policies supported innovation and entrepreneurship. From Thomas Edison to Steve Jobs, U.S. entrepreneurs invented many of the innovations that drove the 20th century global economy, with patents playing an indispensable role in this innovation process — which may explain the prolonged push for congressional patent reform.

Pentagon Must Follow Lengthy Process to Shutter Bases, Cut Excess Military Infrastructure

The process for shedding excess military infrastructure is unlike any other in government.

Chemical Bill Has Potential for Bipartisan Success | Commentary

Politics on Capitol Hill can often be as fickle as a Washington, D.C., weather forecast. However, once every blood-red moon, we see members of Congress work carefully and deliberately to introduce true bipartisan legislation — which is precisely what U.S. Representative John Shimkus, R-Ill., is doing with the draft Chemicals in Commerce Act, proposed legislation to reform the decades-old Toxic Substances Control Act.

Medical Spending Surges With Health Law Sign-Ups

Health care spending surged 9.9 percent during the first quarter of 2014 as people who gained insurance coverage under the health care law apparently began using more medical services, the government said today.

WGDB: McConnell Pledges Gun Ownership Privacy Push to NRA

(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Senate and Patent Reform: The Time Is Now | Commentary

Recently, word from the Senate Judiciary Committee is that negotiators have reached a bipartisan agreement in principle on the key elements of a comprehensive patent reform bill. They are reportedly vetting and nailing down language and preparing the package for mark-up when the Senate returns. A deal appears close to being done, and it’s looking more like the House’s Innovation Act, which bodes well for final passage.

Another 'Too Big to Fail' Merger From Comcast's Playbook | Commentary

Last week, the Senate Judiciary Committee held the first hearing to examine the merger of the nation’s top two cable operators, Comcast and Time Warner Cable. But the merger no longer has the air of inevitability it once did. What happened?

Telecommunications Reforms For Today's Digital Economy | Commentary

We live in a time when we can access information pretty much anywhere, at any time, whenever we want. The rapid deployment of broadband networks have made available a plethora of consumer services and applications in the digital age. In two short decades consumer choice has expanded from limited offerings of voice and video from wired telephone and cable companies to one stop shopping for our voice, video and data needs from wireless, cable and traditional telephone companies.

All Aboard the Music Bus | Commentary

Harmony. Unity. Parity.

Barra Can't Blame 'Old GM' for Today's Problems | Commentary

Why did General Motors wait a full decade to recall more than 1.6 million vehicles that have been connected to 31 deaths and dozens of injuries?

Scientists Warn Severe Weather Risks, Health Impacts of Global Warming Are Imminent

A United Nations report this week warned that a warming planet will exacerbate existing health problems in the coming decades — and U.S. scientists will caution later this month that those and other public health concerns are imminent.

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Gainer, 'Ultimate Jack-of-All-Trades,' Looks Ahead to Private Sector

Terrance W. Gainer spent most of March 4 with the Dalai Lama, guiding the spiritual leader around the Capitol in his capacity as the Senate sergeant-at-arms.

Give the American People a Voice in the National Monument Process | Commentary

The Antiquities Act was established in 1906 as a way for the president to single-handedly create new national monuments. The law provides the president with the express authority to proclaim “historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, and other objects of historic or scientific interest” as national monuments, “the limits of which in all cases shall be confined to the smallest area compatible with the proper care and management of the objects to be protected.”

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Dine Acknowledges Partial Lockdown Spurred by Navy Yard Created Confusion

In the wake of the Washington Navy Yard shooting, the Capitol’s top law enforcement officials went in different directions on security — resulting in an uneven response to a potential campus threat that Capitol Police Chief Kim C. Dine hopes is never repeated.

Critics of GM Bailout Wonder Whether Government Ownership Hindered Response

Critics of the Obama administration’s bailout of the domestic auto industry are questioning whether regulators may have ignored safety defects in General Motors Co. vehicles while the carmaker was under taxpayer ownership.

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In Wake of GM Recall, Lawmakers Are Set to Scrutinize Regulators, as Well as Automakers

The recall of about 1.7 million General Motors Co. vehicles for ignition switch defects linked to 13 deaths has renewed congressional scrutiny of the federal agency charged with regulating highway safety.

Congress Must Hold Expert Agencies Accountable | Commentary

For the second time in as many Congresses, the House of Representatives passed the Regulatory Accountability Act, the first-ever major overhaul of the Administrative Procedure Act. The Senate, however, has yet to give the bill so much as a hearing.

The President's Strained Argument for Privilege | Commentary

The long-standing dispute between Congress and the White House over the botched Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives gun-running program called “Fast and Furious” has entered a new stage. Currently the matter is before the D.C. District Court where the House of Representatives and Department of Justice are at loggerheads over President Barack Obama’s executive privilege claim to conceal various documents from Congress.

Consider the Potential for Abuse | Commentary

In 1792, when charged with enforcing an unpopular tax on whiskey in the face of rebellion, President George Washington noted in a letter to Alexander Hamilton, “It is my duty to see the Laws executed: to permit them to be trampled upon with impunity would be repugnant to” that duty.

Boehner, GOP Dismiss Obama Budget, While Murray Sees Potential Compromises

The instant-reaction kabuki of party leaders to the president’s budget announcement has a certain predictable nature, and this year was no different.

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