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Energy & Environment Archive

The President's Misplaced Energy Priorities | Commentary

Earlier this month, the White House doubled down on President Barack Obamaís pronouncement that climate change is a bigger threat to Americans than terrorism. The comments reveal a startling disconnect and come at a time when we have witnessed an unsettling uptick in terror attacks. These recent statements also underscore just how out of touch the White House is from the daily priorities of Americans. Despite growing strife around the world and a sluggish economic recovery at home, this presidentís No. 1 priority continues to be climate change. Moreover, White House officials do not shy away from the desire to make climate the presidentís legacy, regardless of the cost and consequences to Americans.

From Health Care to Energy: Majority of Americans Pay More, Get Less Under Obama | Commentary

As a member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, I sit at the intersection of energy and health care policy. From that vantage point, Iíve come to see some of the unfortunate parallels between the Obama administrationís past claims about the Affordable Care Act and the similar claims it now makes about the EPAís Clean Power Plan.

Mr. President, Say Yes to Energy | Commentary

For far too long, our countryís energy policies have been based on the idea of energy scarcity and foreign dependence. Now, we seem to be on the verge of energy independence. In order to unleash our true energy potential, we must explore all options ó including exploration on federal lands. It is time to have a long-term energy policy for America. While I welcome President Barack Obamaís recent Mid- and South-Atlantic offshore plan, I view it as one step forward and two steps back because he has removed millions of acres of potentially resource-rich land from exploration. It is time this administration says yes to energy; it is time to open the 87 percent of federal land currently prohibited from potential energy exploration.

Building More Energy Infrastructure Is in Our Best Interest | Commentary

When the United Stated entered World War II in 1941, oil was an essential part of military operations around the world. The U.S. was rich with the abundant natural resources it needed to protect the homeland and help its allies, but there was one problem. Transportation bottlenecks restricted movement to vital distribution points along the East Coast, and German U-boat attacks along the Eastern seaboard and in the Caribbean were successfully cutting off the resources the allies needed to fight. Losses mounted until August of 1941, when the federal government and industry leaders partnered to protect U.S. resources and find a better, safer and faster way to transport oil. The result was the largest pipeline construction project the nation had ever seen. The Inch Pipelines ó the Big Inch and Little Inch ó were each 1,200 miles long, running from Texas to New Jersey. By the end of the war in 1945, the Inch Pipelines had safely delivered more than 350 million barrels of oil to the East Coast. The rest is history.

LNG Exports Can Power America?s Economic Recovery | Commentary

During the darkest days of the Great Recession, one of the lone bright spots was Americaís energy industry. Increased oil and natural gas production powered the manufacturing renaissance that pulled our economy back from the brink.

Oil Producers Plan for Open Crude Exports by 2020

Industry representatives and key lawmakers plan market studies, polls of Americansí views and incremental moves on exports to sway public opinion in favor of allowing crude oil exports.

Congress Should Correct Distortions in the Coal Market and Invest in Struggling Coal Communities | Commentary

Many of the hardest-working communities in America are in the Appalachian coal region that stretches from Ohio and Pennsylvania, to Kentucky, West Virginia and Virginia. For decades, workers have given all of their daylight hours in the darkness of mines so their families and others across the country can keep their lights on. But for decades these communities have suffered economic decline, as widespread job losses have decimated cities and towns and left families with little support. Generations of coal miners have seen their jobs disappear, from 122,000 in 1985 to just 58,000 in 2012, a reality driven largely by market forces and inequities embedded in the coal market.

Congress Needs to Follow the People on Clean Energy | Commentary

Harvesting power from the wind is about investing in long-term energy solutions that can benefit our families, communities and economy for generations to come.

TSCA Reform Should Embrace the Best Application of Toxicological Science -- a Perspective From its Practitioners | Commentary

The federal law governing chemicals used in commerce in the United States affects every person and business, but few are aware of its importance to their lives or that it is outdated and in serious need of modernization.

Energy Department Slow to Take On New Tech

While industry seeks to move forward with nuclear technology, the Energy Department has been reluctant to embrace what it sees as another potential boondoggle.

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Lawmakers, Industry Look to Expand Nuclear Energy Options

In a world of low oil prices and cheap natural gas, the prospects of developing new nuclear technology seem to remain ever in the future, beyond market and regulatory barriers.

Our New Relationship With Cuba | Commentary

The United States and Cuba are moving rapidly toward re-establishing diplomatic ties, which raises an interesting question: What does warming relations between these two nations mean for a warming climate?

A Bold Step Forward in Challenging Citizens United | Commentary

Recently, Rep. Keith Ellison, D-Minn., announced bold legislation that will limit corporate felonsí ability to influence our elections. Itís an important step toward undoing the damage of the Supreme Courtís five-year-old Citizens United decision and restoring control over our democracy.

A Big Week for America's Arctic | Commentary

A final Comprehensive Conservation Plan for the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge that recommends wilderness protection for the highly valued coastal plain. A draft five-year oil and gas leasing plan for the U.S. outer continental shelf that would protect 9.8 million acres of ecologically vital areas of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas. Last week was a big week for President Barack Obamaís conservation legacy: bold steps on the Arctic Refuge, and important ones for the Arctic Ocean. Taken together, they represent a thoughtful and rigorous approach to balancing our nationís energy needs with the conservation of Americaís Arctic, one of the wildest places on earth.

Checking the House Science Committee's New Subpoena Power | Commentary

What is Congress asking of scientists?

Will Biofuels Be Foreign Investment Golden Egg or Cooked Goose?

While itís only been a month, few Washington observers expect an exceptionally cooperative relationship between the new Congress and the White House. No shock there. What is surprising, however, is the fact that President Barack Obama is still failing to capitalize on one particular opportunity to advance his economic policy agenda ó one that doesnít require the approval of Congress. In fact, heís actually getting in his own way.

Keystone Confrontation With White House Looms After Senate Passage

A veto showdown moved closer on Thursday after the Senate passed legislation to approve the Keystone XL pipeline and yank the decision out of President Barack Obamaís hands.

5 Years after the Spill: What BP Owes the Gulf Coast | Commentary

Itís been nearly five years since BP slimed the Gulf Coast, taking the lives of 11 men, wrecking livelihoods and killing tens of thousands of helpless coastal birds. Finally, federal Judge Carl Barbier is heading into the final stretch, deciding how much the third largest oil company in the world will have to pay in pollution fines for the worst oil spill in U.S. history.

Congress Needs To Free U.S. Energy Resources | Commentary

For Americans, the steep increase in U.S. supply of oil and gas has brought with it a bounty of benefits. The energy sector has increased employment in states that otherwise saw economic decline, and the growth in direct jobs has indirectly benefited communities throughout the country. At the same time, the taxes paid by the energy industry have helped bolster our national economy.

Senate Democrats Filibuster Keystone Bill

With a handful of senators out and Democrats calling for more amendments, GOP leaders were unable to limit debate on a measure to approve the Keystone XL pipeline Monday.

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