Oct. 20, 2014 SIGN IN | REGISTER

Education & Labor Archive

Do What's 'Necessary' to Protect Workers | Commentary

In coming months the Occupational Safety and Health Administration will hold public hearings on one of its most far-reaching new regulations in recent years. OSHA’s proposed silica rule would affect more than 2 million workers in construction, oil and gas exploration, manufacturing, and any work that involves silica-containing materials such as soil, dirt, sand, rock, brick, pavement or concrete.

Build on What's Already Working, Mr. President | Commentary

By Fred Dedrick

Cut College Costs Using Carrots, Not Sticks | Commentary

It’s no secret college costs too much. In fact, we’re at the point where student debt exceeds that of credit card holders. This is a particular problem for first-generation and low-income students (the ones the president wants to talk about in an early 2014 White House meeting). If this barrier to education is not addressed, our economic competitiveness and standard of living will fall, as the Commission on the Future of Higher Education warned in 2006.

Employment Numbers Will Set Jobs Debate

The latest employment report out of the Bureau of Labor Statistics provided a case study in the difficulty of using the headline numbers to assess the jobs market and peg fiscal and monetary policy to the numbers.

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Lawmakers Will Tackle Packed Agenda Before Recess

In what has become a familiar scenario, the House and Senate have a full legislative plate and only until Jan. 18 to clean it, with a potential government shutdown on the line.

New Year Brings New Urgency to Address the Wage Crisis | Commentary

After more than four years without an increase in the federal minimum wage, following decades of neglect of this core income standard, many low-paid workers stand poised to get raises — if not through overdue congressional action, then from states and cities moving ahead on their own to address the wage crisis.

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Jobless Benefits, Farm Bill Hit Snags

The most obvious place to find the money to offset extended jobless benefits, a demand of the GOP, may be in the bill that provides food stamps, but that plan will first require a to-be-determined deal on the farm bill.

How Congress Can Make Smarter Use of Domestic Funds | Commentary

Even with the short-term budget deal reached last month, domestic discretionary spending will be billions of dollars below its level of just a year ago. For some of us, that’s a triumph; for others, it’s a tragedy. But we all can agree on the urgent need to spend as wisely as possible.

Airlines Seek to Deny Funding for Overseas Customs Station

The dispute about Norwegian Air Service’s request to expand service to the United States piggybacks on the fight by American air carriers and their pilots to deny funding in fiscal 2014 spending legislation for a U.S. Customs and Border Protection preclearance facility at Abu Dhabi’s international airport.

U.S. Carriers Wary of Norwegian Airline's Cut-Rate Wages

U.S.-based airlines and their pilots are waging a new battle against a foreign carrier they contend is taking advantage of provisions in international law to unfairly compete on American routes.

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Jobless Benefits May Stay on Congress' Cutting Room Floor

Extended unemployment benefits for about 1.3 million Americans expired on Dec. 28, and Congress is unlikely to restore those payments swiftly, or at all.

Reauthorize America COMPETES Act With Full Funding for R&D | Commentary

Before his death, Steve Jobs gave America a good reminder. “Innovation,” he said, “distinguishes between a leader and a follower.”

Let's Stimulate, Not Stifle, Innovation in Higher Education | Commentary

As House and Senate committees hold hearings and the Education Department rewrites its regulations for private colleges, public policymakers must consider the unprecedented changes and challenges in higher education.

Healthy Job Growth Comes in Health Care, Mining

Looking for a new career? In these challenging times, with an economy crawling toward a recovery, the latest jobs report should point to a few areas where jobs are plentiful.

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State, Local Hiring Are Finally Joining the Recovery

The latest employment numbers show a job market that is still in slow recovery, but one underlying trend suggests the economy may have finally turned a corner, raising hopes for broader improvement in 2014.

Inspiring Future Innovators Through Computer Science Education | Commentary

Growing up as the son of a scientist, I learned the importance of science, technology, engineering and math education at an early age. My father was the first African-American to receive a Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of Pittsburgh, and nearly every year, I received a chemistry set for Christmas to spur my interest in science and math.

Minimum Wage Hikes: America's Silent Job Killer | Commentary

Following a string of state-level initiatives to raise minimum wages, Democrats in the Senate are salivating over the prospect of a national wage hike. Beginning with President Barack Obama’s 2008 campaign, in which he repeatedly pledged to increase the federal minimum wage on an annual basis, this issue has remained on the back burner throughout Obama’s presidency until now, when the administration is in desperate need of a distraction. The current incarnation of the proposal would put a double burden on U.S. businesses at a time when the economy needs them to thrive.

A Real Opportunity for Higher Education | Commentary

Congress and the administration have recently been talking a lot about access to and affordability of higher education. The administration has proposed an ambitious overhaul of our entire higher-education system, including the development of a college scorecard to ensure that students and their families have all of the information they need to make an informed decision about their postsecondary education.

Federal Efforts to Go Paperless Ignore Seniors' Needs and Digital Divide | Commentary

It’s difficult for many of us to imagine a world without the benefits of technology. As mobile providers revolutionize our daily lives with each new gadget and companies tout the simplicity of e-commerce and social networking, it’s all too easy to forget that this technology is simply not accessible for millions of Americans, especially seniors.

Improving Our Tax Code for American Students and Families | Commentary

Over the last few months, the media has described Congress as “dysfunctional” and “broken,” and the public as “frustrated” and “angry” with its lawmakers. Interestingly, those are the same words that are used to describe today’s tax code.

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