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Education & Labor Archive

Strengthen ESEA With Early Childhood Education | Commentary

As Congress debates the reauthorization of our nation’s most important education legislation, the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, I’m reminded of the true bipartisan effort Congress has displayed in the past few months. In its endeavors, one issue has particularly emerged as a priority for both Republicans and Democrats, despite major legislative battles and tough funding choices.

FDA May Lack Money to Carry Out Hiring Envisioned in ‘Cures’ Bill

The Food and Drug Administration’s ability to hire senior staff would be enhanced under a bipartisan House package to speed new medical cures, but the cash-strapped agency still may not have enough resources to pay higher salaries and support the hiring permitted under the measure.

What the Rolling Stones Teach Us About No Child Left Behind | Commentary

When the Rolling Stones wrote “You Can’t Always Get What You Want,” Congress was probably not in mind. Yet lawmakers have traded in this basic credo — and the bipartisanship that comes with it — for a “my way or the highway” approach that breeds legislative gridlock. That’s why many in the education community were stunned last month, when senators unanimously approved out of committee a compromise K-12 education bill updating No Child Left Behind.

Proposed Changes to Education Act Undermine Civil-Rights Protections for New Majority of Students | Commentary

This school year marks the first time in American history that students of color make up the majority of students in our nation’s public schools. This year also marks the 50th anniversary of the passage of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. The statute sought to create equal educational opportunities for disadvantaged students, particularly students of color, which had long been disregarded due to segregation and political disenfranchisement. Unfortunately, the Every Child Achieves Act of 2015, which would amend and alter the ESEA, rolls back our nation’s core education civil rights protections. In fact, under the guise of providing flexibility to states, the ECAA sacrifices critical accountability provisions which formed the civil rights foundation of the ESEA. Amendments that could have restored these provisions were withdrawn, and the ECAA was rushed through the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee for consideration on the Senate floor.

Protecting the Hours and Wages of Restaurant Employees | Commentary

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act — now known to most Americans as Obamacare — is a law littered with unintended consequences. Perhaps the most egregious is the number of part-time employees seeing their hours and wages cut as employers scramble to comply with the law’s employer mandate.

Helping Restaurants Serve Up Jobs | Commentary

When it comes to the universality of food, the late Luciano Pavarotti perhaps put it best: “One of the very nicest things about life is the way we must regularly stop whatever it is we are doing and devote our attention to eating.”

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Senate Democrats Put Conditions on Fast-Track Vote

Senate Democrats threatened to block Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s efforts to start debate on a contentious Trade Promotion Authority bill unless the Kentucky Republican guarantees that a customs bill with currency manipulation provisions gets a vote.

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Republican Lawmakers Urge Court to Block Immigration Expansion

More than 100 Republican members of Congress urged a federal appeals court Monday to block the Obama administration’s sweeping new immigration policies such as deferred deportations.

State Chiefs Urge Congress to Act on Critical Law in American Education | Commentary

We teach our students how a bill becomes a law. We teach them about accountability and deadlines. We encourage them to be good leaders.

'Innovation Act' Will Squelch Innovation | Commentary

Three years ago, Congress changed American patent law from a “first to discover” to a “first to file” system. Now, without waiting for these changes to be fully absorbed, some members of Congress are proposing additional changes that would impair the culture of innovation that makes America the place where someone is always trying to build a better mousetrap.

Ted Cruz Wants to Use Religion to Discriminate in Our Nation's Capital | Commentary

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.

Who Foots the Bill for Graduate Medical Expenses?

Teaching hospitals and ambulatory settings in the United States are responsible for training physicians after they complete medical school, through several years of hands-on residency programs in various areas of medicine. Because they rack up significant expenses in training these residents, teaching hospitals receive some additional funds from other sources to cover the costs.

Teaching Hospitals May Benefit From Schumer's Likely Ascension in Leadership

Teaching hospitals have an ally in New York Sen. Charles E. Schumer and are likely to benefit if, as expected, he becomes the Senate’s next Democratic leader.

What Can You Learn From Community Colleges? More Than You Think | Commentary

The emerging national dialogue about making community colleges as free as K-12 education shows how central these institutions have become to our national vision for building a strong economic future. With nearly half of all U.S. undergraduates enrolled in community colleges, we must all agree on this fact: Our nation needs community colleges to be the best they can be. They simply cannot fail.

STEM Fields: Learning Today, Leading Tomorrow | Commentary

While Americans hear mostly about gridlock and partisan fighting in Congress, the issues with strong bipartisan support often get overlooked.

Supreme Court May Hear Texas Case Again

The Supreme Court is set to decide soon whether justices will again hear the case of Abigail Noel Fisher, a white student who was denied admission to the University of Texas-Austin. The court first dealt with the case two years ago, sending it back to the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals.

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Affirmative Action Thrives at Most Selective Colleges

Colleges across the country are trying to diversify their freshman classes, but are doing so on an ever-changing legal terrain about whether, and to what extent, they may consider race in admissions policy.

American Workers Won't Fall for Senate Conservatives' Cruel Hoax | Commentary

In their zeal to fire political volleys against immigrants and commonsense reform of our broken immigration system, the Senate’s Republican leadership turned to Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., to lead their work on the issue.

The Never-Ending, Misguided GOP Attacks on the National Labor Relations Board | Commentary

There’s a little-known agency of the federal government that’s responsible for protecting two of our most sacred American values: workers’ rights and freedom of speech.

NLRB's Ambush Election Rule, Bad Policy and Bad Law | Commentary

Membership in labor unions has been falling for decades and is at an all-time low in the U.S. While there are many reasons for this decline, it is an indicator that many workers simply don’t find unions as necessary as they once did.




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