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Education & Labor Archive

'Innovation Act' Will Squelch Innovation | Commentary

Three years ago, Congress changed American patent law from a “first to discover” to a “first to file” system. Now, without waiting for these changes to be fully absorbed, some members of Congress are proposing additional changes that would impair the culture of innovation that makes America the place where someone is always trying to build a better mousetrap.

Ted Cruz Wants to Use Religion to Discriminate in Our Nation's Capital | Commentary

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.

Who Foots the Bill for Graduate Medical Expenses?

Teaching hospitals and ambulatory settings in the United States are responsible for training physicians after they complete medical school, through several years of hands-on residency programs in various areas of medicine. Because they rack up significant expenses in training these residents, teaching hospitals receive some additional funds from other sources to cover the costs.

Teaching Hospitals May Benefit From Schumer's Likely Ascension in Leadership

Teaching hospitals have an ally in New York Sen. Charles E. Schumer and are likely to benefit if, as expected, he becomes the Senate’s next Democratic leader.

What Can You Learn From Community Colleges? More Than You Think | Commentary

The emerging national dialogue about making community colleges as free as K-12 education shows how central these institutions have become to our national vision for building a strong economic future. With nearly half of all U.S. undergraduates enrolled in community colleges, we must all agree on this fact: Our nation needs community colleges to be the best they can be. They simply cannot fail.

STEM Fields: Learning Today, Leading Tomorrow | Commentary

While Americans hear mostly about gridlock and partisan fighting in Congress, the issues with strong bipartisan support often get overlooked.

Supreme Court May Hear Texas Case Again

The Supreme Court is set to decide soon whether justices will again hear the case of Abigail Noel Fisher, a white student who was denied admission to the University of Texas-Austin. The court first dealt with the case two years ago, sending it back to the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals.

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Affirmative Action Thrives at Most Selective Colleges

Colleges across the country are trying to diversify their freshman classes, but are doing so on an ever-changing legal terrain about whether, and to what extent, they may consider race in admissions policy.

American Workers Won't Fall for Senate Conservatives' Cruel Hoax | Commentary

In their zeal to fire political volleys against immigrants and commonsense reform of our broken immigration system, the Senate’s Republican leadership turned to Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., to lead their work on the issue.

The Never-Ending, Misguided GOP Attacks on the National Labor Relations Board | Commentary

There’s a little-known agency of the federal government that’s responsible for protecting two of our most sacred American values: workers’ rights and freedom of speech.

NLRB's Ambush Election Rule, Bad Policy and Bad Law | Commentary

Membership in labor unions has been falling for decades and is at an all-time low in the U.S. While there are many reasons for this decline, it is an indicator that many workers simply don’t find unions as necessary as they once did.

Congress Can't Dodge Social Security Disability Insurance Trust Fund's Approaching Insolvency | Commentary

As if stirring, like Rip Van Winkle, from a 20-year snooze, Congress is finally awakened to the teetering finances of the Social Security’s disability program. Better late than never, but policymakers have known for years that this day would arrive — and it has.

Congress Should Correct Distortions in the Coal Market and Invest in Struggling Coal Communities | Commentary

Many of the hardest-working communities in America are in the Appalachian coal region that stretches from Ohio and Pennsylvania, to Kentucky, West Virginia and Virginia. For decades, workers have given all of their daylight hours in the darkness of mines so their families and others across the country can keep their lights on. But for decades these communities have suffered economic decline, as widespread job losses have decimated cities and towns and left families with little support. Generations of coal miners have seen their jobs disappear, from 122,000 in 1985 to just 58,000 in 2012, a reality driven largely by market forces and inequities embedded in the coal market.

Port Dispute May Force Obama to Invoke Taft-Hartley Act

When managers of cargo terminals at 29 West Coast ports closed their facilities to ships last weekend, they opened the door to a new discussion about when the president can invoke powers under labor law to keep the country’s transportation networks running.

Shippers Expecting Happier Chinese New Year

West Coast ports opened with a backlog of ships waiting to unload this week, after vessel operations were halted by employers over the weekend.

You Shouldn't Have to Be Lucky to Get Paid Sick Days | Commentary

Everyone gets sick, from the common cold to a more serious illness. Recently, my 15-year-old daughter called me after school to tell me she had a bad headache and sore throat. Because my employer provides paid sick days, I was able to leave in the middle of the afternoon and take my daughter for a strep and flu test — no questions asked and no pay docked. Every parent should be able to be there for his or her sick child and have the same level of trust and economic stability that I do.

The Numerous Tests of No Child Left Behind

Much of the discontent with the 2001 education law known as No Child Left Behind has stemmed from the rising number of standardized tests children must take every year.

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One State Takes Aim at Plethora of Public School Tests

There is little in K-12 education policy with broader bipartisan support than reducing the number of standardized tests children take, a result of the 2001 law commonly known as No Child Left Behind.

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act: Reauthorize an Early Start and a Great Finish | Commentary

As Congress debates the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act —commonly known as No Child Left Behind—it’s a great time to consider better policies for all children. No Child Left Behind wasted a great deal of effort and money and produced too few benefits because it addressed problems in our educational system too late in the lives of children and removed incentives for schools to develop the full range of intellectual, emotional and social skills necessary for individuals to flourish in the 21st century economy. ESEA should be revised to start with quality early learning and continue with K-12 education that develops the whole child.

America's Community Colleges: The Infrastructure of Opportunity | Commentary

President Barack Obama reminded us in his State of the Union address, “America thrived in the 20th century because we made high school free, sent a generation of GIs to college, and trained the best workforce in the world. But in a 21st century economy that rewards knowledge like never before, we need to do more.” He unveiled a plan for free community college education.

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