Jan. 31, 2015 SIGN IN | REGISTER

Economy Archive

Budget Reconciliation Through the Years

Congress has employed budget reconciliation to enact dozens of laws, addressing issues that range from tax cuts to student loans.

Budget Reconciliation May Be Obamacare's Enemy

Democrats used the complicated process of budget reconciliation to pass part of President Barack Obama’s health care legislation in 2010, and avoid a Senate filibuster; now Republicans are weighing whether to use the same process to chip away at the law.

A Health Care Agenda for the New Congress Beyond "Repeal Obamacare" | Commentary

With Republicans now controlling both chambers of Congress, no law will come under more scrutiny than Obamacare.

One Year After 'Traffic Problems,' Idea of 'President Christie' As Scary as Ever | Commentary

They were the eight words that turned New Jersey politics — and the 2016 Republican presidential primary — upside down.

A Congressional Commission to Bolster the Prosperity in Asia-Pacific | Commentary

As many analysts have pointed out, cross-straits issues concern not only the two sides of the Taiwan Strait, but also the Asian-Pacific region, because it may be the only issue that could provoke a conflict between the United States and China. At a deeper level, China still presents a distinct challenge to the United States. The 114th Congress leaders in the House and the Senate must focus on how the nation will deal with it’s rebalancing in the Asia-Pacific, their associated security concerns, and regional evolving security realities.

House Rule Change Would Force Long-Term Estimates for Major Bills

House Republicans are moving to increase the use of dynamic scoring through a rules change that would require long-term estimates of the economic effects of major legislation.

A Simple Way to Boost Homeownership - End Conservatorship of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac | Commentary

For generations, affordable homeownership has been a pillar of the American dream and the primary driver of wealth creation and social mobility. While Congress has not yet come to a consensus on how to proceed with housing reform, studies have shown the host of positive externalities that stem from homeownership — ranging from better health and education to safer streets and more vibrant communities.

Congressional Orientation on Bipartisan Legislation Could Stop Gridlock | Commentary

Members of Congress are so caught up in their parties that they are oblivious to recent history where politicians have been successful working together to pass some of the nation’s most cherished legislation. The just-passed appropriations bill, where everyone wanted to hurry home for the holidays, is an outlier. Orientation for new members teaches ethics and rules, gives a tour, takes pictures and restates the primer of “How a Law Is Made.” It lacks lessons showing how Congress has worked in passing bipartisan legislation. Members of the House and Senate are probably as rusty as classes of young people who know few leaders of the past.

Energy Export Restrictions Keep Production in the Past | Commentary

Over the past several years the United States has achieved an energy turnaround that few experts could have anticipated. Led almost singlehandedly by improvements in shale production, the country has transitioned from a position of foreign dependence to a global energy leader — bolstering American consumers, businesses and manufacturers at every turn.

Fear-Mongering About Foreign Patent Trolls | Commentary

As was highlighted at the recent nomination hearing for Michelle Lee as the next director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office it is important to take a look at the patent landscape and the talk of more legislative action on our patent system under discussion in Congress.

Boehner and Obama Have Something in Common: Both Contributed to the Failure of Transparency Reform | Commentary

The 113th Congress is winding to a close and however few things Speaker John A. Boehner, R-Ohio, and President Barack Obama agree on, both dropped the ball on making the government more accountable and transparent.

Moving Forward, Ideas Matter | Commentary

As the dust settles after the midterm elections, it is clear that voters across the country sent a strong message that they have had enough of partisan gridlock and inaction in Washington. And now the hard work begins – turning to the future and to the ideas that will move our nation forward.

Washington Needs to Embrace the Now Generation | Commentary

Over the past few years, the United States has witnessed an erosion of trust in our public institutions by our citizens. This mistrust is most readily apparent in my generation, the millennials. As the Harvard Institute of Politics pointed out after their March poll of young Americans, “18- to 29- year-olds’ trust in public institutions is at a five-year low — and their cynicism toward the political process has never been higher.”

Republicans Must Seize Filibuster Reform Opportunity | Commentary

Republicans won the Senate by promising to reform a dysfunctional Congress. Yet with their new majority secure, Republicans are considering rolling back recent filibuster changes that reduced the number of votes required to invoke cloture on executive and most judicial nominees to a simple majority.

Wisconsin Proposal Will Figure in Presidential Politics

Wisconsin is a particularly significant test case for considering alternatives to the excise tax on fuel, especially considering the proposal that emerged in the days after Gov. Scott Walker won re-election.

A Do-Something Congress | Commentary

As this lame-duck Congress limps to the end of its tenure, pundits are shouting about its ineffectiveness. The 113th Congress passed fewer laws than any Congress in 60 years. With control of the government still divided along party lines, many see little hope the next Congress will be any better.

No College Degree? No Problem: Why Education Policy Needs to Focus on Career Planning | Commentary

There is no doubt about it: Statistically speaking, a college degree will offer the average worker a significant wage premium over workers with only a high school diploma. But does that mean that workers with no education beyond high school do not have a chance at well-paying, fulfilling careers? Far from it.

Energy and Commerce Hearing an Important Step Toward a National, Consistent Labeling Standard | Commentary

As the 113th session of Congress winds to a close, activity on Capitol Hill is bustling, with members of Congress working to address the most critical issues facing the country. To that end, members of the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Health held a critical hearing this week on a subject important to all Americans: food safety and labeling.

Commercial Space Industry Regroups After Accidents

Two accidents in the commercial space industry this year — an unmanned rocket that exploded shortly after launch in the fall and an experimental suborbital craft that broke apart during flight shortly after — are almost sure to come up the next time a congressional committee discusses the private spacecraft market. But, experts say the incidents won’t have much of an effect on the sector’s increasing expansion.

Ebola: Who Bears the Cost of Keeping Us Safe? | Commentary

The Ebola virus, which has now touched our shores and taken the lives of two victims in the U.S., is a threat lethal enough to demand full mobilization of our health care resources, which is what federal officials have urged. Consequently, hospitals in recent weeks have been arming themselves with the necessary knowledge, supplies and resources to confront the danger and ensure it is contained and managed skillfully.

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