Aug. 1, 2014 SIGN IN | REGISTER

Economy Archive

NLRB Stacking the Deck Against Small Businesses and Employees | Commentary

Behind every small business is a story of entrepreneurial vision and risk taking. All startups are a daunting endeavor. That’s why the franchising model was created — to help launch new businesses, leveraging resources from successful nationally recognized companies to individual operations.It’s a model that has worked well for decades — franchisors grow and expand their brand-reach while franchisees realize the dream of starting their own business.

Hepatitis is Still the Silent Killer | Commentary

Although the price of a revolutionary new hepatitis C treatment has made headlines recently, the real hepatitis crisis continues largely unreported. A more immediate problem for many Americans is not how much one hepatitis C treatment might cost; it is how many Americans are infected with viral hepatitis and do not even know it.

Congress Vs. GM: 'Why Not Jail' Squares Off Against K Street | Commentary

GM CEO Mary Barra has appeared before congressional committees no fewer than four times in the past few months to testify about her company’s deadly ignition switch problem, emerging gradually from her initial persona as a mournful penitent to a posture of straight-backed, jaw-locked defiance during questioning by Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., in mid-July.

The Congressional Earmark Ban: the Real Bridge to Nowhere | Commentary

In 2005, a $223 million earmark to fund the construction of a bridge from Ketchikan, Alaska, to the tiny island of Gravina, Alaska, captured national attention. The earmark, which was included in a bill to provide funding for reconstruction efforts after Hurricane Katrina, rightfully drew scorn and ridicule from across the country. In 2007, Congress stripped the earmark.

Restore the Senate | Commentary

Something has gone terribly wrong when the American people have a less favorable impression of Congress than Brussels sprouts, root canals, and used car salesmen. Most people today believe the Senate in particular has become completely dysfunctional. And in many ways it has. I’ve served in the Senate for nearly 38 years, and I have never seen it this bad.

Caging the Captive Tiger Problem | Commentary

If your neighbor has a tiger in his backyard, he might not have to tell you.

Boxing Champ: My Gun Didn't Protect Me | Commentary

For 20 years, my ex-husband Jim said he would kill me if I ever tried to leave him. On November 23, 2010 — the day I told him that I wanted a divorce — he tried his best to stay true to his word. That night, Jim came into my room and said he had to show me something. I could see the knife sticking out of his shorts. I couldn’t see the gun in his pocket.

Congress Should Explore Greater Flexibility in the Workplace | Commentary

Capitol Hill is often described as one of the most difficult work environments in the U.S. The workforce is made up of extremely dedicated young people working very long hours, and participating in a public policy process that impacts the lives of millions of people. Because of those demands congressional managers often find it difficult to explore office policies that might enhance how employees align their professional and personal lives.

story blurb thumbnail

Hani Garabyare's Journey From Somalia to the Senate

When Hani Garabyare was a little girl, she prayed that she would be an American.

Road Closed to Investor Cash for Infrastructure Funding

Pension funds are slowly starting to take a look at investing in infrastructure projects, raising hopes among transportation advocates and lawmakers that the country’s roads and bridges could see an infusion of private cash.

Why Ex-Im is Indispensable | Commentary

Debate in Congress over the future of the U.S. Export-Import Bank is coming to a head. Absent congressional action, Ex-Im will be unable to provide new loans or guarantees to American exporters after its charter expires on Sept. 30.

Congress Should Agree on Allowing a Third National Wireless Carrier | Commentary

Already this year, we’ve seen announcements of two major transactions in the media and telecommunications space: Comcast announced plans to acquire Time Warner Cable, and AT&T announced plans to acquire DirecTV. Congress has begun weighing in on these transactions and, if recent press reports are to be believed, they will soon have an opportunity to review the long-rumored merger of Sprint and T-Mobile. It is this third proposed transaction that is most interesting because it carries the potential of a policy dilemma for both Republicans and Democrats in Congress.

Washington: Over-Leveraged on All Fronts | Commentary

One of the most frequently discussed concepts in the past six years is leverage. The financial crisis of 2008-09 is regarded by many economists as a crisis caused by excessive leveraging of borrowed funds. This was an “investment leverage” crisis. But we can also see excessive leveraging in the political realm of society, especially in Washington.

It's Time to Ratify the Treaty America Envisioned | Commentary

As we approach the 24th anniversary of the passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act, our nation has seen great advancement in opportunities for millions of Americans with disabilities to lead fruitful, productive lives as a result of this law. The ADA has also served as a standard for disability rights movements worldwide and as a framework for the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, a treaty which seeks to ensure the rights of people with disabilities worldwide.

What Washington Can Do to Prevent Train Tragedies | Commentary

A lot has been written in this newspaper about how little Congress is accomplishing this summer. But there is something important Washington could do before the August recess without any congressional action — demand safer standards for hauling crude oil.

Should Congress Come to Puerto Rico's Rescue? | Commentary

Puerto Rico’s government is at serious risk of defaulting on its debt. If that happens, the ball will be in the court of the U.S. Congress to decide whether and how to bail it out. This matters not just to the people of Puerto Rico; it has serious implications for the U.S. economy and our commitment to ensure our local governments live up to the rule of law.

Prescott Grant May Leave Marine Mammals Stranded | Commentary

At Tuesday’s congressional briefing on marine mammal strandings, Congressmen William Keating, D-Mass., and Jared Huffman, D-Calif., spoke to approximately 80 congressional staffers and others about how crucial The John H. Prescott Marine Mammal Rescue Assistance Grant Program is for conducting important marine mammal rescue work and government-mandated research not only for their states, but nationwide.

All Americans Benefit From Senate Rules Reform | Commentary

What do Richard Boulware, a federal judge in Nevada; Nina Pillard, a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit; and Melvin Watt, director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency, have in common?

The Magic Formula to Setting Up Events With Congress | Commentary

For most Americans, August means more time at the beach, afternoons on the golf course and maybe a family reunion. For Congress, it means dozens of meetings with constituents back home.

Retired Military Leaders Urge Congress to Reject Efforts to Undo Antiquities Act | Commentary

U.S. Presidents have enjoyed and successfully implemented the privilege of designating national monuments for more than 100 years. To date, 15 presidents on both sides of the aisle have used their authority under the Antiquities Act, granted to the president by Congress, to protect scenic wonders and historic sites like the Grand Canyon and the Statue of Liberty — places that have become symbols of America’s beauty and freedom around the world.

SIGN IN




OR

SUBSCRIBE

Want Roll Call on your doorstep?