July 28, 2014 SIGN IN | REGISTER

Defense & Foreign Policy Archive

Logistics of Afghan Drawdown Prove Challenging

The United States military is making steady progress in the removal of people and equipment from landlocked Afghanistan, according to military officials who say the delay in a final decision about the U.S. presence after 2014 should not prevent a full-scale withdrawal, if that becomes necessary.

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Delay in Afghan Pact Roils War Plan, Defense Budget

The bilateral security agreement between the United States and Afghanistan has still not been signed, sealed and delivered, creating budget uncertainty and potentially significant logistical problems, according to military and congressional leaders.

U.S. Should Open Parallel Negotiations with Iran on Israeli-Palestinian Issue | Commentary

Israel’s interdiction on March 5 of an alleged Iranian weapons shipment bound for Gaza has no doubt increased Congress’s skepticism of the Obama administration’s diplomatic engagement with Iran.

Capitol Police Chief Kim Dine Grilled on Miriam Carey Shooting

Pressed to delve into lessons learned from the Oct. 3 shooting of Miriam Carey, Capitol Police Chief Kim C. Dine stood by the department’s use of force Monday.

Getting Missile Defense Right | Commentary

Not long ago, missile defense was a contentious issue about Cold War strategic stability. Today, it has widespread bipartisan support on Capitol Hill. We no longer debate whether to have defenses, but which programs, at what cost, and how well they will work.

Women Key to Ending Global Hunger | Commentary

Too many women, men, and children are needlessly suffering from chronic hunger around the world. The United Nation’s Food and Agriculture Organization says the number is as high as 840 million — nearly three times the entire population of the United States.

Obama Announces New Penalties on Russia as Moscow Sanctions Lawmakers

President Barack Obama ordered new sanctions Thursday on top Russian officials and supporters of the Russian government over the “illegal” annexation of Crimea, while urging Russia to change course and recognize Ukraine’s sovereignty.

Feinstein Vs. Brennan: Heads Will Roll | Commentary

It shouldn’t be too surprising to hear that the CIA may have spied on the work of Senate Intelligence Committee staffers. Hardball is an old game in the nation’s capital, as old as our government itself. The leaks, the vicious rumors, the struggle to shift blame onto others was ubiquitous during the days of George Washington’s presidency, when the president was pained and mystified by the infighting that went on among even the most distinguished and talented members of his presidency, including Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton.

Industry Group Says Fracking Could Help Ukraine

European countries seeking to ease their dependence on Russian natural gas may discover that their salvation lies deep beneath their native soil.

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Ukraine's Neighbors Urge Expansion of U.S. Gas Exports

The crisis in Ukraine has injected a new element of Cold War politics, as well as a supporting cast of European diplomats and Washington lobbyists, into the debate on Capitol Hill over natural-gas exports.

Allow a Vote on Iran Sanctions | Commentary

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine proved once again that the world is a very dangerous place. While the Obama administration continues to respond to this crisis, America cannot afford for the president to take his eye off the ball on a pressing issue of national security: Iran’s illicit nuclear program.

The Time Is Now for Free-Trade Agreements | Commentary

Acrimony has become one of Washington’s defining characteristics. For almost the entirety of President Obama’s tenure, the legislative and executive branches have been at bitter odds, failing to seize big moments and enact legislation of great substance. Unfortunately, unless someone steps forward, another opportunity could soon be lost, this time, to pass free trade agreements with allies in Europe and Asia that will open markets with nearly one billion customers to American employees and employers.

Merchant Marine Says Food Aid Keeps Them Afloat

Shipping companies and sailors united to fight the Obama administration’s proposal to nearly halve the amount the federal government spends on transporting food aid from the United States to regions in need.

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Despite Tug-of-War, USAID Gains Leeway on Food Aid

The Obama administration gained some ground during this Congress in its bid to change the way the United States buys and delivers emergency food aid to hungry people around the globe.

Self-Inflicted Wounds Harming Military Readiness, Morale and Veterans | Commentary

Congress and the Department of Defense’s recent attempts to save money have injured vital areas: military readiness, morale and the veteran community. Intentions of recent legislation to curb spending have been admirable. The Congressional Budget Office recently confirmed that no sequester is needed due to Congress’ adherence to its budget laws, at least until 2016. However, continued cost reductions hinder the Navy’s ability to be a strong force for our defense and further neglect our military and veterans.

Kosovo: Great Progress, but the Job Is Not Done | Commentary

With so many foreign policy hot spots around the world, many Americans take the stability of Europe for granted. But as recent events in Ukraine remind us, we have yet to reach the point at which Europe is truly “whole and free.” In the Balkans, great strides have been made as some countries have entered the European Union and NATO and others appear on the path toward future Euro-Atlantic integration. Yet we must not lose focus, as other nations in the region are still working to consolidate their gains and overcome the legacy of the breakup of the former Yugoslavia.

Why It's Time to Deepen U.S.-India Ties | Commentary

At a time when Americans are seeking positive international relationships instead of conflict, there is no better choice than India. With a congressionally mandated U.S. International Trade Commission hearing scheduled this week, this is the right time to take stock of U.S.-India relations. The ITC hearing is part of an investigation into India’s trade, investment and industrial policies requested by the chairmen and ranking members of the Senate Finance Committee and the House Ways and Means Committee.

After 20 Years of Trade Relations, Vietnam and U.S. Look Forward | Commentary

Twenty years ago this month, trade relations between Vietnam and the United States were restored when President Bill Clinton lifted a punishing trade embargo. This was an important step toward normalizing relations between our countries, putting our interactions on a course that continues to deepen, expand and benefit both nations.

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Issa, Cummings Feud Over Investigation Into Navy Yard Security Clearances

In their first hearing examining last year’s Navy Yard shooting, Republicans and Democrats on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee clashed on lessons to be learned from the tragedy.

Pentagon Struggles to Find Solution to Soaring Health Costs

Even as the Defense Department’s budget grew at historic rates during the height of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Pentagon officials began to voice concerns that the military’s rising health care costs would threaten other spending priorities.

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