Oct. 31, 2014 SIGN IN | REGISTER
Don't Forget to Enter to Win Roll Call's 2014 Election Contest!

Defense & Foreign Policy Archive

Congress Has Thin Legislative Record on Combating Disease Outbreaks

Although Congress has publicly fretted over the threat of infectious disease pandemics, there have been few legislative attempts in the last two decades to address such health emergencies, leaving lawmakers with a limited set of policy options as they try to contain the Ebola outbreak.

Congressional Hawks Weaken an Iran Nuclear Deal | Commentary

Late last November, when the U.S., its P5+1 partners, and Iran agreed to curbs on Iran’s nuclear program in exchange for limited sanctions relief, Congress responded with draft legislation imposing new sanctions. This threatened to spoil the first break in the decade-old nuclear dispute with Iran and return the parties to the path of confrontation. It was only after significant White House outreach on Capitol Hill that the bill was defeated and negotiations allowed to proceed.

Should Congress Reconsider TTIP? | Commentary

Recently there has been discussion over whether the United States should enter into a free trade agreement with the European Union known as the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership. There are several major issues with TTIP that make it not in the interest of the United States to enter into the agreement.

It's Time to Export American Energy | Commentary

Try, for a moment, to imagine the world today without the United States oil boom. If the picture seems dire, you’ll know you’re on the right track.

Congress: Stop Militarizing Law Enforcement | Commentary

In the past month, Reps. Hank Johnson, D-Ga., and Raúl R. Labrador, R-Idaho, introduced the Stop Militarizing Law Enforcement Act in the House, accompanied by Sen. Tom Coburn’s, R-Okla., version in the Senate. This swift, bipartisan action is just in time, because the American police officer appears to have transformed into a soldier.

Congress Is Endangering Missile Defense | Commentary

News media are jammed with reports of epidemics, terrorists, and armed conflicts that threaten our warfighters and allies abroad. Just as alarming, our homeland has never been more vulnerable to attack by advanced weaponry now in the hands of potential enemies.

Stability at the Cost of Democracy | Commentary

As the world’s leaders gather at the United Nations, they will take the opportunity to discuss issues of extremism that are currently ravaging many countries around the world. While these issues clearly have every right to be on the world’s stage, another danger is rising in the shadows of extremism.

Elephants: Critical to America's National Security | Commentary

Though Ahmed Godane, the leader of the Somalian terrorist group al-Shabab, was killed in a U.S. airstrike earlier this month, Ugandan authorities uncovered a 19-person al-Shabab cell armed with explosives just last week. What action can the United States take against African terrorist groups that advances American security, protects U.S. service members, and fits within budgetary constraints? One approach suggested by Rep.Peter A. Defazio, D-Ore., might surprise you: Protect Africa’s elephants with the Targeted Use of Sanctions for Killing Elephants in their Range, or TUSKER, Act.

Combat vs. Climate | Commentary

There’s plenty of uncertainty surrounding President Barack Obama’s plan to “degrade and ultimately destroy” the Islamic State: How limited or open-ended is it? How will Congress respond? What will it cost?

Congress Should Revitalize the Export-Import Bank | Commentary

I recently met with a firm in Omaha, Neb., that operates factories throughout the world and needed guidance on expanding into Latin America.

Lawmakers Disagree on Discretionary Defense Cap

As is typical in the defense authorization process, House and Senate lawmakers made differing choices over key policy and military hardware issues. Both bills, however, would adhere to the $514 billion discretionary cap for fiscal 2015 Pentagon base spending established by the Ryan-Murray budget.

story blurb thumbnail

Defense Authorization Again Headed Toward Last-Minute Dealmaking

It was probably wishful thinking on Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid’s part when he added floor action on the annual defense policy bill to his crowded to-do list for the abbreviated September session.

Deja Vu In Syria? | Commentary

This week, Congress is scheduled to vote on the administration’s three-month-old request for $500 million to train and equip a reported 6,000 fighters for Syria’s so-called “moderate” opposition.

Collaboration with Iran's Regime is Self-Defeating | Commentary

As Iraq teeters on disintegration, some on Capitol Hill are floating the idea of collaborating with Iran in order to defeat the threat posed by the terror group Islamic State (ISIS). But, would this really serve American interests?

Congress Should Push for U.S. Peacekeepers in Ukraine, Now | Commentary

Ukraine can defeat the separatists but it can’t defeat Russia. For Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko to build a strong Ukrainian state, independent of Moscow, he first must secure a cease fire.

NATO Must Build its Counterterrorism Capability, Not Just Focus on Russia | Commentary

When President Barack Obama arrived at the North Atlantic Treaty Organization summit in Wales, he found a room full of member states that are focused on the original purpose of NATO: to provide a collective defense against the grave threat of Russian expansion. But the president must recognize that today’s threats are more complex than those of 1949, the year of NATO’s founding. NATO and its member countries are not only threatened by the prospect of war from the East, but also by a growing and dangerous new enemy on its southern flank — the terrorist group known as the Islamic State of Iraq and al Sham, or ISIS.

Between a Woman and Her Doctor Is No Place for U.S. Policy | Commentary

You’ve probably heard of this summer’s Supreme Court decision in Burwell vs. Hobby Lobby that let employers pick and choose what birth control methods they would cover, inserting themselves in a key decision between a woman and her doctor. Many Americans were justifiably angry. What you might not know is there’s a U.S. policy that’s been undermining the trust between women and their doctors around the world for the past 30 years.

Congress' To-Do List: Border Funding, Stopgap

Democrats and the Obama administration will continue to push for more border funding when Congress returns from recess, but a short legislative calendar and a growing rift between the parties on immigration may leave the upcoming continuing resolution as perhaps their only shot for securing additional dollars before the elections.

The Urgent Need to Preserve the Tomahawk Missile System | Commentary

Before summer recess, the Senate roundly rejected the White House’s attempt to kill off one of this country’s most storied missile technologies.

Stopgap Could Mean More Juggling for Border Agencies

Days after Congress skipped out of Washington for recess last month, Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson announced plans to shift some $400 million in funding from other agency programs to manage the Southwest border crisis.

SIGN IN




OR

SUBSCRIBE

Want Roll Call on your doorstep?