July 30, 2015 SIGN IN | REGISTER

Defense & Foreign Policy Archive

A New Vision for an Old Relationship | Commentary

Throughout the first 15 years of this century, the United States has experienced seismic changes to our place in the world — some good, some concerning. While some Americans feel as though our position of global leadership is slipping, others see new opportunities for engagement and diplomacy which are becoming more evident with the shifting dynamics of a more multipolar world.

Exclusive: Gillibrand Held Up Dunford Over Military Sexual Assault Documents

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand has lifted her anonymous hold on Marine Corps Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr.’s nomination to be the next chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, lining up his confirmation before the Senate departs for the August recess.

House Appropriations' Rogers Likely to Give Up Gavel

House Appropriations Chairman Harold Rogers says he likely will give up his gavel rather than seek a waiver when his third two-year term expires next year, leaving an opening for the chairmanship of the spending panel.

Cuba Travel, Trade Would Be Allowed Under Senate Bill

Senate appropriators approved landmark language Thursday that would accelerate the Obama administration's initiative to thaw relations with Cuba.

Right-Wing Extremism Cannot Be Ignored | Commentary

Despite common misperceptions, domestic terrorism, usually in the form of right-wing anti-government extremism, is a major source of violence in America. The death of four Marines in Chattanooga, Tenn., is a tragic reminder that extremist violence comes in all shapes and sizes and often comes from places we’re least suspecting. Sadly, we were also reminded of this fact last month, when a gunman entered the historic African-American church in South Carolina and killed nine people. Make no mistake, Dylann Roof is a terrorist. He committed these heinous acts of violence out of hate, to incite fear and deepen the divisions that still linger from a long and painful history in the U.S. However, what is not clear is how our nation will act to prevent these senseless acts of terror from happening in the future.

Iran Nuclear Deal May Give Americans a Break at the Gas Pump

The tentative deal designed to limit Iran’s nuclear program led to a quick — though modest — decline in oil prices, raising the possibility American drivers may see a prolonged break from high gasoline prices and creating an opening for Republican lawmakers to step up efforts to end a ban on exporting oil produced in the U.S.

Experts Set Off Alarms Over McCain's Defense Acquisition Overhaul

Senate-passed legislation intended to improve the Pentagon’s troubled acquisition system may end up having the opposite effect, according to a growing number of experts.

GOP Critics Have Few Options on Iran Deal

Republican lawmakers can do little to block or significantly alter the final nuclear agreement with Iran, despite blistering criticism and a pledge from at least one GOP hawk that it is dead on arrival.

Caviar and Airplane Sales Sweeten Iran Deal

In exchange for lifting crippling U.S., European and U.N. oil and financial sanctions, Iran agreed to a historic deal that limits its nuclear production capacity and fuel inventory over the next 15 years.

Obama Says He'll Veto Any Legislation Blocking Iran Deal

President Barack Obama on Tuesday announced that after two years of negotiations, a final nuclear deal had been reached with Iran, one he said met every single one of the United States’ "bottom lines" laid down in a preliminary agreement in early April.

Confederate Flag Flap a Death Knell for Appropriations Work

The fiscal 2016 appropriations process effectively screeched to a halt Friday, the day after bitter divisions over a Republican Confederate flag provision sunk the Interior-Environment appropriations bill and apparently laid claim to the rest of the spending measures as well.

McCain to Meet with Afghan Leaders During Holiday Troop Visit

Sen. John McCain will celebrate the Fourth of July in Afghanistan in what is becoming an annual holiday tradition for the Senate Armed Services chairman.

Democrats Pursue a No-Veto Strategy on Spending Bills

President Barack Obama has issued just four vetoes so far in his presidency, and it appears he won't be taking out the veto pen for a host of contentious fiscal 2016 spending bills, either — despite threats he's already lodged on seven of them.

House Scraps NDAA Conference Vote Amid 'Blue Slip' Hang Up

The House and Senate conference on their annual defense policy bill isn't happening. At least not today.

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Armed Services Chairmen Aiming for Conference on NDAA Next Month

The Senate just passed its fiscal 2016 defense authorization bill, but Armed Services Chairman John McCain and his House counterpart, Mac Thornberry, are already saying a compromise can be reached on final legislation within weeks.

Congressional Inaction Leaves Military Installations, Communities Stuck at Crossroads | Commentary

Despite action on the National Defense Authorization Act, the threat of sequestration and military spending cuts remain. Missions are being scaled back, force numbers are declining, and communities, states and regions that have long-served as proud homes to our installations continue to take the economic hits.

Honoring World War II Merchant Marine Veterans | Commentary

A small group of heroes is walking the halls of Congress this week, proudly sharing memories of the work they and friends long gone did more than 70 years ago to help the Allied forces win World War II.

Spike in West Africa Ebola Cases Shows Need to Address Underlying Health Care Needs | Commentary

On May 20, the World Health Organization reported a substantial increase in the weekly total of new Ebola cases in both Guinea and Sierra Leone and responded by deploying a response team. This comes in the shadow of the success in Liberia that was proclaimed to be Ebola-free in May, the result of a comprehensive response by President Barack Obama and his administration to invest in Liberia’s health care infrastructure. Although a lot of the attention to the U.S. response focused on the role of the American military, our response was actually much more thorough. The United States provided personal protective equipment, funded and trained medical workers, deployed laboratories, supported disease tracing and started a large-scale social messaging campaign to inform Liberians about practices to protect themselves from infection.

America Needs to Strengthen Biodefense Now | Commentary

The United Nations Security Council recently heard firsthand testimony from the victims of a chemical-weapons attack in Syria. A Syrian doctor spoke of his frantic efforts to treat more than 100 people who were hit by chlorine-filled bombs in the town of Sarmeen. Many were vomiting and suffering respiratory distress.

Clinton Email Scandal Affects State Department Funding

Democrats are expected to put up a fight in the coming days and weeks over a Republican plan to withhold a substantial amount of the State Department’s operating budget as punishment for the amount of time it is taking the agency to produce the emails of former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton.

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