April 19, 2014 SIGN IN | REGISTER

Defense & Foreign Policy Archive

Cuban Twitter: Not as Silly (or Stupid) as it Sounds | Commentary

When the Associated Press revealed that the State Departmentís U.S. Agency for International Development had funded ZunZuneo as a sort of Twitter for Cuba, it provoked peals of laughter, ridicule and criticism. Sen. Patrick J. Leahy called it ďdumb, dumb, dumb.Ē The senator has a point. The program did not last more than two years and USAIDís attempt to hide the U.S. governmentís involvement in it clearly failed. In other words, the only the thing ZunZuneo did was embarrass the American people; Cubans are not more free and ZunZuneo has gone the way of many tech startups: failure and dissolution.

Fears of Israeli Spying Underlie Reluctance on Visa Waiver Program

Lawmakers and staffers on two House committees are concerned that admitting Israel to a program that eases entry of foreigners into the United States would increase the risk of Israeli espionage, congressional aides say.

Defense Hawks May Look to Boost Competition in Air Force Satellite Launches

The Air Forceís space program is facing tough scrutiny on Capitol Hill as influential lawmakers in both parties publicly question the serviceís commitment to competition in the increasingly lucrative area of satellite launches.

Russian Engine Used in Atlas V Rocket Under Scrutiny

The Pentagon has launched a review to determine whether using a Russian-built rocket engine to launch military satellites has any national security implications, following Russiaís seizure and annexation of Crimea.

Republicans Poised to Slam Obama on Defense

Republicans are likely to pounce on the Pentagonís $34 billion list of unfunded priorities as evidence that President Barack Obama is intentionally underfunding the military.

The US-China Relationship Begins With Our Young People | Commentary

First Lady Michelle Obama recently traveled to China to promote educational exchange, and she called on young Americans ó from every background, every walk of life ó to study in China, learn Mandarin and forge friendships that will deepen cross-cultural understanding. Her message: Understanding China is a critical skill, one that all Americans must gain in order to compete, collaborate and succeed in the 21st century.

Filling Gaps in the Fight Against Nuclear Terror | Commentary

A little past midnight at a gas station in Mexico a man approached a car, forced the driver and passenger out at gunpoint and bound them in an empty parking lot before driving off. In the carjacked vehicle was Cobalt-60, a highly radioactive material that could be used to make a dirty bomb. The radioactive cargo disappeared for two days before eventually being recovered.

Natural Gas Exports Can Help America and Our Allies

I recently visited Ukraine to speak directly with leaders in the region. We talked about ways the United States could support Ukraine in its conflict with Russia. They stressed the role energy policy plays in this crisis.

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Gainer, 'Ultimate Jack-of-All-Trades,' Looks Ahead to Private Sector

Terrance W. Gainer spent most of March 4 with the Dalai Lama, guiding the spiritual leader around the Capitol in his capacity as the Senate sergeant-at-arms.

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Dine Acknowledges Partial Lockdown Spurred by Navy Yard Created Confusion

In the wake of the Washington Navy Yard shooting, the Capitolís top law enforcement officials went in different directions on security ó resulting in an uneven response to a potential campus threat that Capitol Police Chief Kim C. Dine hopes is never repeated.

Logistics of Afghan Drawdown Prove Challenging

The United States military is making steady progress in the removal of people and equipment from landlocked Afghanistan, according to military officials who say the delay in a final decision about the U.S. presence after 2014 should not prevent a full-scale withdrawal, if that becomes necessary.

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Delay in Afghan Pact Roils War Plan, Defense Budget

The bilateral security agreement between the United States and Afghanistan has still not been signed, sealed and delivered, creating budget uncertainty and potentially significant logistical problems, according to military and congressional leaders.

U.S. Should Open Parallel Negotiations with Iran on Israeli-Palestinian Issue | Commentary

Israelís interdiction on March 5 of an alleged Iranian weapons shipment bound for Gaza has no doubt increased Congressís skepticism of the Obama administrationís diplomatic engagement with Iran.

Capitol Police Chief Kim Dine Grilled on Miriam Carey Shooting

Pressed to delve into lessons learned from the Oct. 3 shooting of Miriam Carey, Capitol Police Chief Kim C. Dine stood by the departmentís use of force Monday.

Getting Missile Defense Right | Commentary

Not long ago, missile defense was a contentious issue about Cold War strategic stability. Today, it has widespread bipartisan support on Capitol Hill. We no longer debate whether to have defenses, but which programs, at what cost, and how well they will work.

Women Key to Ending Global Hunger | Commentary

Too many women, men, and children are needlessly suffering from chronic hunger around the world. The United Nationís Food and Agriculture Organization says the number is as high as 840 million ó nearly three times the entire population of the United States.

Obama Announces New Penalties on Russia as Moscow Sanctions Lawmakers

President Barack Obama ordered new sanctions Thursday on top Russian officials and supporters of the Russian government over the ďillegalĒ annexation of Crimea, while urging Russia to change course and recognize Ukraineís sovereignty.

Feinstein Vs. Brennan: Heads Will Roll | Commentary

It shouldnít be too surprising to hear that the CIA may have spied on the work of Senate Intelligence Committee staffers. Hardball is an old game in the nationís capital, as old as our government itself. The leaks, the vicious rumors, the struggle to shift blame onto others was ubiquitous during the days of George Washingtonís presidency, when the president was pained and mystified by the infighting that went on among even the most distinguished and talented members of his presidency, including Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton.

Industry Group Says Fracking Could Help Ukraine

European countries seeking to ease their dependence on Russian natural gas may discover that their salvation lies deep beneath their native soil.

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Ukraine's Neighbors Urge Expansion of U.S. Gas Exports

The crisis in Ukraine has injected a new element of Cold War politics, as well as a supporting cast of European diplomats and Washington lobbyists, into the debate on Capitol Hill over natural-gas exports.

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