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Budget Archive

Bomber Must Fly Through Enemy Airspace on Capitol Hill

No matter which company wins the new B-3 bomber deal, the program’s advocates will start facing the first of many budget battles before any metal has been bent.

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Wide Political Fallout Expected From Massive Nuclear Bomber Deal

In a few weeks, the Pentagon will announce the companies picked to develop America’s next bomber jet, sparking a budget war that will last for years and reshape the defense industry, experts say.

House Appropriations' Rogers Likely to Give Up Gavel

House Appropriations Chairman Harold Rogers says he likely will give up his gavel rather than seek a waiver when his third two-year term expires next year, leaving an opening for the chairmanship of the spending panel.

Congressional Budget Process Is Broken, Drastic Makeover Needed | Commentary

The congressional budget process is broken and needs drastic reconstruction. In nearly half of the past two decades, a staggering nine years, Congress failed to pass a budget agreement — the essential step in following its own rules for budget decision-making. Instead, the federal government lurched from one budget crisis to another with bizarre ad hoc procedures — government shutdowns, sequestration, the fiscal cliff and a supercommittee — and funded the government through continuing resolutions and massive omnibus appropriations bills.

Cuba Travel, Trade Would Be Allowed Under Senate Bill

Senate appropriators approved landmark language Thursday that would accelerate the Obama administration's initiative to thaw relations with Cuba.

Campaign Finance Loophole Inserted in Spending Bill

Senate appropriators folded into a draft spending bill a provision long sought by Majority Leader Mitch McConnell that would relax campaign finance coordination rules between candidates and the political parties.

Confederate Flag Flap a Death Knell for Appropriations Work

The fiscal 2016 appropriations process effectively screeched to a halt Friday, the day after bitter divisions over a Republican Confederate flag provision sunk the Interior-Environment appropriations bill and apparently laid claim to the rest of the spending measures as well.

Uproar Over Confederate Flag Blocks Interior-Environment Bill

Republican leaders abruptly pulled the fiscal 2016 Interior-Environment spending bill from the floor Thursday in a highly embarrassing about-face after Democrats and moderate Republicans revolted against a planned vote to allow Confederate flag imagery to be displayed on cemeteries on federal land.

Republicans to Vote on Allowing Display of Confederate Flag

In a rapid and dramatic policy shift, Confederate flag imagery could be allowed to remain displayed on graves on federal land in some circumstances under a Republican-sponsored amendment that will be voted on in the House on Thursday.

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House Votes to Restrict Confederate Flag Imagery

In an otherwise contentious debate Tuesday night over the fiscal 2016 Interior-Environment spending bill (HR 2822), the House adopted without opposition a trio of amendments that would restrict Confederate flag imagery on federal land.

A Budget That Would Undermine and Reverse Progress on Health Care | Commentary

Anyone who looked closely at the fiscal 2016 Labor-HHS-Education budget that sailed through the House Appropriations Committee recently was in for a jolt. It may be impossible to overstate the many ways this legislation would take the country backward.

Democrats Pursue a No-Veto Strategy on Spending Bills

President Barack Obama has issued just four vetoes so far in his presidency, and it appears he won't be taking out the veto pen for a host of contentious fiscal 2016 spending bills, either — despite threats he's already lodged on seven of them.

Act Now: Promote Long-Term Fiscal Transparency | Commentary

As more 2016 candidates announce their presidential bids, they’ll start discussing issues Americans care about the most. But there’s one issue where neither Democrats nor Republicans are telling the truth due to inaccurate financial reporting — our national debt.

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Armed Services Chairmen Aiming for Conference on NDAA Next Month

The Senate just passed its fiscal 2016 defense authorization bill, but Armed Services Chairman John McCain and his House counterpart, Mac Thornberry, are already saying a compromise can be reached on final legislation within weeks.

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Repealing Health Law Under Dynamic Scoring Increases Deficit, CBO Says

The Congressional Budget Office estimated Friday that repealing the health care law would increase the federal deficit by $137 billion from fiscal 2016 to 2025 using a dynamic score, compared to $353 billion under traditional scoring practices.

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Spending Bills Headed for Partisan Gridlock

Confrontations between the parties, and factions within the GOP conference over government spending levels will probably leave Congress in gridlock in the weeks ahead, dragging to a halt the unusually rapid pace House and Senate appropriators have managed to set with their fiscal 2016 bills.

Senate Appropriations Debates Floor Tactics

There’s been scant movement so far to begin talks that could lead to a budget agreement later this year, but robust debate has been playing out in the House and Senate Appropriations committees for several months.

Local Lawmakers Want Metro Funds Restored

Congress has an example of what’s at stake for transit funding at its doorstep. The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority faced a $50 million cut in its federal funding next fiscal year under a House proposal, though planned Wednesday floor action had the final number in flux.

Mass Transit Loved by Locals, but Tough for Feds

Step into the office of a member of Congress to talk about transportation and you’ll probably get an earful about the size and scope of federal transit programs. Democrats generally want more investment. Some Republicans question whether the federal government should even be involved.

Toomey Fights for Allocations to Crime Victim Fund

Several Republican senators are moving forward with plans to try to further limit the use in the appropriations process of so-called CHIMPs, which they say in one instance have deprived crime victims of billions of dollars’ worth of assistance.




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