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Banking Archive

Ryan: 'No Idea' How Long I'll Be Speaker

Speaker Paul D. Ryan, after two weeks on the job, said he has “no idea” how long he may lead the House, committing only to the 14 months left in the current Congress during an interview on CBS’ “60 Minutes.”

The 5 Agencies Ted Cruz Would Cut

Like a certain Texas Republican before him, Ted Cruz had a bit of an “oops” moment during Tuesday’s GOP presidential debate.

Shuster and Ryan: Exercise Buddies, Highway Bill Champions

Rep. Bill Shuster, R-Pa., who’d been waiting three years for the House to take up long-term highway legislation, was wary when he saw nearly 300 amendments had been filed on the bill he’d helped draft. An added challenge: The bill was scheduled to hit the floor during Speaker Paul D. Ryan’s first week on the job.

Ways and Means Gavel Now Officially in Brady's Hands

As expected, the House Republican Conference formally approved Kevin Brady as the next Ways and Means chairman.

Brady Set to Replace Ryan as Ways and Means Chairman

Updated 5:43 p.m. | Kevin Brady was chosen to replace Paul D. Ryan as chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee.

Democrats Urged to Oppose Ex-Im Amendments to Highway Bill

House Democrats expect plenty of “gotcha” Export-Import Bank-related amendments to the highway bill, and Republicans shouldn’t count on much bipartisan support on them.

Brady Makes Pitch for Ways and Means Gavel

Hours after Paul D. Ryan was sworn in as speaker, Rep. Kevin Brady made his pitch to succeed the Wisconsin Republican on the Ways and Means Committee.

GOP Rebels Orchestrate Ex-Im Bank Job | Procedural Politics

Last year in this space, I wrote about House discharge petitions as “useful minority tools,” even though they seldom gain the requisite 218 signatures to force floor consideration of the targeted legislation. The subject of that column was the Democrats’ attempt to force consideration of a bill to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour. That effort had stalled at 197 signatures (all Democrats) when the clock ran out on the 113th Congress.

GOP Leadership Vacuum Seen Helping Ex-Im Bank's Future

One of the most important legislative drives this fall will manifest John A. Boehner’s promise to “clean the barn” for the next speaker — or else looms as the first ideological comeuppance for the new Republican leadership.

McCarthy Raises Campaign Cash, But He's No Boehner

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy is one of the strongest campaign fundraisers in his conference, but he still can't hold a candle to outgoing Speaker John A. Boehner, say Republicans mulling McCarthy as Boehner's successor.

Outside Influences Seek to Sway House GOP Leadership Races

Conservative activists are mobilizing to sway the House GOP leadership contests, as K Street lobbyists say they are quietly offering their own counsel and behind-the-scenes help to favored contenders.

House GOP Civil War Takes to the Airwaves

Just two days after House Speaker John A. Boehner stunned Washington by announcing he will leave Congress next month, two top members of his House Republican conference traded barbs in a remarkably public display of internal dissent on a Sunday network news show.

McCarthy Profile: Genial Party Loyalist Rose Quickly

Speaker John A. Boehner's resignation at the end of October makes his top deputy, Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy of California, the likeliest candidate to inherit the gavel. Boehner even offered his unqualified endorsement, saying the five-term lawmaker would be an "excellent" speaker.

Boehner Profile: Achievements and Pitfalls Mark Recent Years

Speaker John A. Boehner's stunning announcement Friday that he will resign from his House seat next month caps a 25-year career marked by legislative victories and intra-party conflicts. 

Boehner Quits; McCarthy Seen as Successor

Speaker John A. Boehner told fellow Republicans Friday morning he will resign from Congress and give up his House seat at the end of October, according to members.

Swipe Fee Reform Is a Success for Consumers | Commentary

Five years ago, Congress enacted the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act to curb the abuses and rigged games of the financial services industry — and it included landmark reform that cut the average big bank debit card swipe fee in half and saved billions for Main Street businesses and consumers.

On Fifth Anniversary, Dodd-Frank Financial Regulations Appear to Be Here to Stay

Backers of the 2010 financial overhaul point to numerous attempts to repeal Obamacare as one of their chief arguments the banking law is here to stay. They note there have been dozens of attempts to repeal the health care law, but Congress has not taken a single vote to repeal the greatest changes in financial regulation since the Great Depression.

Caviar and Airplane Sales Sweeten Iran Deal

In exchange for lifting crippling U.S., European and U.N. oil and financial sanctions, Iran agreed to a historic deal that limits its nuclear production capacity and fuel inventory over the next 15 years.

Confederate Flag Flap a Death Knell for Appropriations Work

The fiscal 2016 appropriations process effectively screeched to a halt Friday, the day after bitter divisions over a Republican Confederate flag provision sunk the Interior-Environment appropriations bill and apparently laid claim to the rest of the spending measures as well.

Treasury to Put a Woman on $10 Bill; Plans Summer-Long Search

Congress may not have much say about who will be the first woman to grace United States currency in a century despite a push by lawmakers to give a founding mother equal billing with the likes of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln.




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