Wyoming

How Many Gas Pipelines Do We Need?
As demand for natural gas rises, so do questions about pipeline capacity

A natural gas pipeline yard is shown beyond a fence in Skokie, Ill., in this 2003 photo. (Tim Boyle/Getty Images file photo)

BY JACKIE TOTH

When coal-fired and nuclear power plants are retired, they’re usually replaced not by new renewable technologies like solar or wind, but with power plants fueled by natural gas.

From Asia, Trump Presses Tax Writers on Individual Mandate
Neither House nor Senate GOP overhaul bill includes repeal language

Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., speaks with President Donald Trump as they arrive for the Senate Republicans’ policy lunch in the Capitol on Oct. 24. Trump tweeted Monday from Asia that he wants tax legislation to repeal the individual health insurance mandate. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump on Monday again pressed House and Senate Republican lawmakers to use tax overhaul legislation to end the 2010 health care law’s individual insurance mandate, something neither chamber’s plan includes.

Tweeting just before midnight in Manila, Philippines, Trump laid down a marker for House and Senate Republicans as they continue work on their separate bills. The president wrote that he is “proud of the Rep. House & Senate for working so hard on cutting taxes {& reform.} We’re getting close!”

Four Areas Senate Tax Bill May Differ From the House
Discrepancies could tee up battle among chambers, White House

White House counselor Kellyanne Conway speaks at a Republican news conference pushing the tax overhaul. Appearing behind her, from left, are Sens. Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia and David Perdue of Georgia, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, Sens. John Barrasso of Wyoming and Steve Daines of Montana, and Grover Norquist, president of Americans for Tax Reform. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Republicans are discussing provisions for their version of the bill to overhaul the U.S. tax code that would differ significantly from the House’s legislation.

The discrepancies — which range from changes to the current state and local tax deduction to when corporate tax cuts take effect — could tee up a battle among the two chambers and the administration that might complicate the timeline the GOP is pursuing to get a bill to the president’s desk.

Gosar’s Brother Calls Him ‘an Embarrassment’
Congressman espoused conspiracy theories about Charlottesville violence

Rep. Paul Gosar’s family said he should apologize to progressive billionaire George Soros for saying he collaborated with the Nazis in his youth. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photos)

Arizona Rep. Paul Gosar’s family continued criticizing his conspiracy theories with his brother calling the lawmaker “an embarrassment.”

Gosar’s brother David criticized the congressman for espousing conspiracy theories about racial violence in Charlottesville, Virginia and that progressive megadonor George Soros was behind the operation, Phoenix New Times reported.

GOP Insists All Is Well, Despite Chaotic Day on Hill
Corker feud, Flake retirement send shock waves through Senate

Wyoming Sen. John Barrasso speaks with President Donald Trump as they arrive for the Senate Republicans’ policy lunch in the Capitol on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

On a day when President Donald Trump went after one GOP senator and another announced his retirement while accusing his party of failing to stand up to the president, most Senate Republicans said the circus-like atmosphere was not distracting them from their legislative agenda.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell smiled as he dismissed the notion that Trump’s feud with a respected member of his caucus is keeping members from doing their work. So, too, did Bob Corker, the Tennessee Republican involved in an escalating war of words with Trump

Trump Fatigue? GOP Senators to Hear Directly From President, Again
Former aide: 'No such thing as too much coordination' between Hill, president

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C. — flanked from left by Sens. Roy Blunt, R-Mo., John Barrasso, R-Wyo.,  John Thune, R-S. D., Bill Cassidy, R-La., John Cornyn, R-Texas, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky. —  and the rest of the GOP conference will hear directly from President Donald Trump on Tuesday at the Capitol. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Senate Republicans hear from President Donald Trump frequently — on the phone, on the golf course and on Twitter. They will hear from him in person Tuesday when he joins them for lunch at the Capitol.

Perhaps more than recent past presidents, the 45th chief executive lets members know just how he feels about both policy and politics. And frequently, Trump’s public displays of honesty can throw confusion into members’ attempts to reach consensus on legislation that requires his signature.

Senate Adopts Budget With House-Backed Changes
Late amendment expected to help speed up consideration of a tax overhaul

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell arrives for lunch with Senate Republicans in the Capitol on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Senate adopted a fiscal 2018 budget resolution Thursday night that was amended at the 11th hour with the aim of making it acceptable enough to House Republicans to avoid a conference committee and speed the consideration of a tax overhaul.

The budget was adopted 51-49.

Senate Moves to Adopt House-Backed Budget Changes
Amendment negates need to go to conference to iron out differences

Senate Budget Chairman Michael B. Enzi’s amendment modified the House-passed budget resolution. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate on Thursday night agreed, 52-48, to an amendment by Budget Chairman Michael B. Enzi that modified the House-passed budget resolution, jettisoning reconciliation instructions aimed at getting $203 billion in mandatory spending cuts. 

Instead, the Wyoming Republican’s amendment replaces the House directive for a deficit-neutral tax cut with one that could add up to $1.5 trillion to the deficit over 10 years, similar to the Senate’s.

EPA Moves to Repeal Climate Rule; Lawsuits to Follow
With Clean Power Plan on the chopping block, environmental groups gear up to sue

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, left, said this week that unraveling the Clean Power Plan would right “the wrongs of the Obama administration.” (Tom Williams/Roll Call File Photo)

The EPA’s move on Tuesday to undo the Obama administration’s signature climate change rule will almost certainly trigger an onslaught of lawsuits from environmental groups and many blue states that have been bracing for that action since President Donald Trump took office.

The agency said it had filed a notice with the Federal Register proposing to unravel the 2015 Clean Power Plan and will seek public input into that proposal over a 60-day period. But the EPA did not commit to promulgating a replacement policy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, which environmentalists have said would lead them to sue to stop the repeal or force the agency to write a new policy.

Photos of the Week: SCOTUS Is Back, Gun Debate Reignited and Federal Budget Steps
The week of Oct. 2 as captured by Roll Call’s photographers

West Virginia Sens. Joe Manchin III and Shelley Moore Capito talk during their news conference on the introduction of the American Miners Pension Act in the Capitol on Tuesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

The Supreme Court began its new term this week and heard oral arguments in a case that could determine whether political redistricting is constitutional. And after the Sunday night massacre in Las Vegas, GOP lawmakers appeared Thursday to be coalescing around a bill that would ban bump stocks, a type of device that effectively transforms a semi-automatic rifle into an automatic.

Also this week: The House passed a budget resolution for fiscal year 2018, as the Senate began committee consideration of its own resolution. These steps are meant to pave the way for a tax overhaul measure.