White House

HOH’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner Party List
See what is and isn’t going on this year

Music producer Steve Aoki, left, talks with actor Keegan Michael Key at the Yahoo/ABC News party in the Washington Hilton before the White House correspondents' dinner on April 30, 2016. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

It’s party time again in Washington, D.C. as the White House Correspondents’ Dinner quickly approaches.

The dinner is April 29 and the bulk of parties surrounding the event start on Thursday.

Why Republicans Don’t Fear a Shutdown, But Should
HealthCare.gov rollout shifted attention back to White House before midterm elections

Republicans didn’t suffer at the ballot box because the rollout of HealthCare.gov was a disaster. They now don’t fear a shutdown — but they should, Nathan L. Gonzales writes. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

For many Republicans, it’s a fairly simple calculation: There was a supposedly catastrophic government shutdown in 2013 and the GOP gained 13 House seats a year later. So what’s the big deal if the government shuts down again?

With another funding deadline on the horizon, selective memory loss could have negative consequences for the Republican Party if there is another government shutdown.

Rob Portman's Plan to End Government Shutdown Showdowns
Revives bill to provide automatic continuing resolutions

Sen. Rob Portman wants to end the threat of federal funding lapsing. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

With the risk of a government shutdown at week's end, Sen. Rob Portman is making another attempt at ending such threats once and for all.

The Ohio Republican, who led the Office of Management and Budget in the last GOP White House, will be reintroducing legislation that he has spearheaded since arriving in the Senate in 2011 that would provide for automatic continuing resolutions when Congress fails to advance appropriations bills before fiscal year funding deadlines.

3 Things to Watch as Trump Hits 100 Days
 

With President Donald Trump’s 100th day in the Oval Office arriving this weekend, Roll Call’s White House reporter John T. Bennett delves into what to watch for in the days leading up to this administration’s first big milestone.

Top Dems Blast Trump’s First 100 Days, Border Wall Demands
Schumer: Best if president 'stepped out' of government shutdown-avoidance talks

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer, D-N.Y., and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif. — pictured here in March — on Monday had critical words for President Donald Trump. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Updated at 11:35 a.m. Democratic leaders slammed President Donald Trump on Monday for a “parade of broken promises to working people” during his first 100 days, and said his demands for border wall funding in a must-pass spending bill have stalled talks to avert a government shutdown.

Congressional Democrats are planning a week-long barrage to counter a White House public relations campaign to paint Trump’s first three-plus months as successful. They offered a preview of their messages on a conference call with reporters, with Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer of New York dubbing many of Trump’s campaign promises “broken” or “unfulfilled.”

Two Freedom Caucus Members Feeling Strong After Trump's Threat Last Month
Sanford and Labrador still comfortable with their votes against health care bill

Rep. Mark Sanford, R-S.C., said President Donald Trump threatened a primary challenge against him. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

South Carolina Republican Rep. Mark Sanford talked with CNN on Sunday about the threat he says President Donald Trump’s team made on his seat during the health care debate last month — a primary challenge against him.

“It all, I guess, fits in love, war and politics but I don’t think it’s particularly productive to his own legislative agenda and we’ll see what develops,” he said.

Syria, Trump and Congress’ Ever-Eroding War Powers
Lawmakers lukewarm to a force-authorization measure for U.S. missile strike

President Donald Trump and his national security team receive a briefing on April 6 about an air strike he ordered on a Syrian air base. (White House photo)

President Donald Trump has gone to great lengths to break from the policies and approaches of his predecessor. Yet, when it came to justifying a round of U.S. military missile strikes in Syria, the new commander in chief dusted off a legal rationale crafted by Barack Obama’s administration.

Like the 44th president, Trump contended that the Constitution vests in the office of the presidency enough war powers to carry out some isolated military operations without lawmakers’ approval.

Opinion: Figure It Out, Mr. President
Congress isn’t built to just do what Donald Trump says

President Donald Trump must choose if he wants to be a hardcore anti-establishment president or a smart deal-maker, Allen writes. (Scott Olson/Getty Images) (Scott Olson/Getty Images)

If it were up to President Donald Trump — and a lot of Americans — Congress might not exist. After all, the legislative branch is the kind of inert obstacle that a disruptor business executive doesn’t have to contend with as he innovates and improvises in the private sector. 

Alas, for Trump, the Founding Fathers believed that wild swings in direction could tear a fragile nation asunder. They made it difficult for a president — any president — to rewrite public policy, push the nation to war or enter into treaties.

Analysis: 5 Ways Republicans Can Finish Health Care Overhaul
No path is a slam dunk, some options have a better chance than others

House Speaker Paul D. Ryan conducts a news conference with members of the GOP caucus on Capitol Hill on April 6 to announce a new amendment to the health care bill to repeal and replace the 2010 law. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republicans have promised their effort to repeal and replace the 2010 health care law is alive and kicking. And they’re likely to keep going at it until they pass a bill or get elected out office. 

There are at least five different legislative paths for getting a health care overhaul passed before next year’s midterm elections — some more viable than others and none guaranteed to work without support from a majority of Republicans.

White House Plans Week of Activities as Trump’s 100th Day Approaches
President still lacks a big legislative victory amid record low approval ratings

President Donald Trump prepares to sign an executive order last week in Wisconsin aimed at bringing jobs back to American. His 100th day in office is fast approaching without a legislative win. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

Updated at 8:41 a.m. | The White House has prepared an action-packed week for President Donald Trump ahead of his 100th day in office, including the unveiling of the “principles” behind his tax overhaul plan and more executive orders.

Trump and his senior staff are gearing up to make the case it will be the most productive 100 days for any president in 84 years. Democrats, meanwhile, will be pushing their position — that the 45th president has spent his first few months in office breaking his campaign promises.