White House

‘Disappointed’ Trump Holds Cards Close on Firing Sessions
AG’s recusal from Russia probe ‘unfair to the presidency,’ Trump gripes

Then-Sen. Jeff Sessions campaigns last year with then-GOP nominee Donald Trump. President Trump would not say Tuesday if he intends to fire now-Attorney General Sessions. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file)

President Donald Trump is holding his cards close on whether he intends to fire Jeff Sessions, his hand-picked attorney general he now worries is too “weak” and “beleaguered” to do the job.

“I am very disappointed with the attorney general,” Trump said in the White House Rose Garden during a joint news conference with his Lebanese counterpart. “He should not have recused himself” from the Justice Department’s Russia election investigation “almost immediately after he took office.”

Grassley, Feinstein Issue Subpoena for Manafort Testimony
Committee wants Trump campaign chief to appear on Wednesday

Then-GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump (left) and his then-campaign manager Paul Manafort at the 2016 Republican National Convention in Cleveland last July. Senators want to hear from Manafort, possibly this week, about Russia. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

The Republican and Democratic leaders of the Senate Judiciary Committee said Tuesday they saw no choice but to use a subpoena to compel Donald Trump’s former campaign manager, Paul Manafort, to testify on Wednesday.

Chairman Charles E. Grassley, R-Iowa, and ranking member Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., said in a statement they were “willing to accommodate” Manafort’s requests to cooperate with the committee’s investigation without appearing at Wednesday’s hearing, but they “were unable to reach an agreement” for his desire to provide “only a single transcribed interview to Congress, which would not be available to the Judiciary Committee members or staff.”

Senate Democrats Wage Eleventh-Hour Twitter War on GOP Health Care Bill
Vote Tuesday decides whether chamber moves ahead with Obamacare repeal

Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., was one of a slew of Democrats to take part in a late Twitter flurry against the GOP health care overhaul ahead of a momentous vote to proceed Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Senate Democrats in the last 24 hours have launched a furious volley of attacks against their colleagues across the aisle ahead of the vote Tuesday on whether to proceed with the GOP health care bill that would dismantle the Affordable Care Act.

The Democrats hope Twitter is their Agincourt and tweets their arrows.

Trump Slams Sessions Amid Talk of Firing Him
Asked if Trump wants Sessions gone, Scaramucci says, ‘Yeah, you’re probably right’

President Donald Trump has referred to Attorney General Jeff Sessions as “beleaguered.” (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

President Donald Trump took aim at Attorney General Jeff Sessions Tuesday in an early morning tweet amid reports that the president has consulted his advisers about firing him.

And his newly appointed communications director, Anthony Scaramucci, acknowledged later Tuesday that Trump wants Sessions out.

Capitol Ink | Court Jester

Trump Turns Bully Pulpit on Senate Republicans
President says it is time to vote on health care measure

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., along with Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, are looking for the votes to advance their health care measure. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

President Donald Trump turned up the heat on his own party Monday when he sent a blunt message to Senate Republicans: end years of merely talking about overhauling Barack Obama’s health law and send him a bill to get it done.

“There has been enough talk and no action. Now is the time for action,” Trump said in a Monday afternoon statement ahead of a planned Tuesday Senate vote on whether to officially take up a health bill.

Trump Returning to Rallies After West Wing Shake-Up, Kushner Testimony

It’s a busy week at the White House following Friday’s West Wing shake-up with the appointment of Anthony Scaramucci as communications director and the resignation of press secretary Sean Spicer. President Donald Trump’s son-in-law Jared Kushner is on the Hill on Monday to testify behind closed doors about his meeting with a Russian lawyer during the 2016 campaign, shortly before the president heads back to the campaign trail with a rally in Youngstown, Ohio. See the video for Roll Call White House reporter John T. Bennett’s analysis of the week ahead.

Jared Kushner, After Intel Meeting, Denies Russia Impropriety
Trump son-in-law says no collusion with Kremlin during 2016 race

Jared Kushner, son-in-law and senior adviser to President Donald Trump, leaves the Hart Senate Office Building on Monday after his interview with the Senate Intelligence Committee staff. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

UPDATED 5:15 p.m. | Following nearly three hours of testimony before Senate Intelligence Committee staffers on Monday, senior presidential adviser Jared Kushner stood outside the White House and denied colluding with Russian officials during the 2016 campaign, saying all of his actions were both legal and proper.

President Donald Trump’s son-in-law defended himself during rare public remarks just outside the executive mansion’s West Wing, saying: “I did not collude with Russia, nor do I know of anyone else in the campaign who did so.”

Roy Moore Declares Himself Front-runner in Alabama Senate Race
Says Brooks and Strange are ‘fighting for second place’ in Alabama

Credit: Campaign video screenshot. Internal polls show Roy Moore leading a tight three-way race.

Former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore taunted his opponents running for the Senate in Alabama last week, saying they were “fighting for second place.”

No public polls of the Senate primary have been released, but AL.com reports internal polls put Moore ahead of Rep. Mo Brooks and Sen. Luther Strange in a tight three-way race ahead of six other candidates running for the seat. 

Former GOP Senator Warns ‘No Do-Overs’ on Health Care
David Durenberger says ‘no’ is only ‘defensible vote’

Former Minnesota Sen. David Durenberger in a Monday op-ed warned Republican lawmakers against repealing the 2010 health care law. (CQ Roll Call file photo)

Former Minnesota Republican Sen. David Durenberger took aim Monday at current GOP senators for attempting to ram through a motion to proceed on their controversial bill to dismantle the 2010 health care law.

In a USA Today op-ed, Durenberger laid out the normal procedures for deliberating on a bill with ramifications for millions of Americans of this magnitude: “You ask questions. You hold hearings. You understand what it would mean to your constituents. You listen to those who know the system. And when it doesn’t add up, you vote against it.”