Washington DC

Meadows: Freedom Caucus Open to Changes
White House negotiating with Republicans opposing health bill

Rep. Mark Meadows said his conservative caucus was open to negotiating with the White House on changes to a health care bill opposed by enough Republican members to sink the measure. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

By Rema Rahman, Lindsey McPherson and Joe Williams/CQ Roll Call

Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows said Wednesday he and members of the conservative group are open to negotiating changes to a health care bill that is struggling to gain enough votes by Republicans to pass the House.

GOP Bill Takes Aim at Long-Shot Medicaid Expansion Hopes
Provision is a blow to efforts in North Carolina and Kansas

North Carolina Rep. Richard Hudson said the GOP provision was partially put in to benefit Republican governors who wanted to avoid political pressure to expand their own states’ entitlement programs. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Republicans in North Carolina and Kansas who hope to scale back Medicaid can claim a victory in the updated GOP plan to overhaul the 2010 health care law. The package takes aim at those two states, which had the highest — albeit long-shot — hopes of expanding their Medicaid programs this year.

The provision, included in a manager’s amendment to the bill released by House leaders on Monday, would prevent states from expanding their Medicaid programs if they didn’t already do so by March 1.

Are Trump and McConnell Preparing the Next SCOTUS Pick?
Kentucky judge is a favorite of Senate majority leader

President Donald Trump might be looking to a close associate of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's for his next selection to the Supreme Court. (George LeVines/CQ Roll Call)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Judge Neil Gorsuch’s confirmation hearing is still underway, but President Donald Trump may have laid the groundwork for his next Supreme Court pick Monday night in the Bluegrass State.

As Trump was on stage for a campaign-style rally at Freedom Hall, members of the Kentucky press corps were reporting that the president intends to nominate Judge Amul Thapar to fill an appellate seat for the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. The White House made it official on Tuesday.

Massive Eisenhower Memorial Could Break Ground as Early as September
Congressional support among the last barriers after 20-year dispute

An artist’s rendition of the vista from the Eisenhower Memorial looking toward the Capitol. (Courtesy Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission)

Construction could begin as early as September on a proposed memorial for President Dwight D. Eisenhower that has been mired in controversy for almost 20 years. 

That’s according to the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission and the chairman of the House committee that oversees the funding for the project.

Poll Shows Ossoff Increases Lead in Georgia Race to Replace Price
Comes as conservatives grapple with Republican replacement for Obamacare

A new poll from a conservative-leaning outfit shows Democrat Jon Ossoff increasing his support among voters in the race to replace former Georgia Republican Rep. Tom Price. (Photo by Dustin Chambers, Courtesy Jon Ossoff for Congress)

A new poll shows that Democrat Jon Ossoff has strengthened his lead in Georgia’s 6th Congressional District race, and the race tightening among Republicans.

A poll by the conservative website zpolitics and Clout Research shows Ossof leading with 41 percent of the support of those polled. But it also shows that former Secretary of State Karen Handel and fellow Republican Bob Gray are nearly tied, with Handel at 16.1 percent and Gray at 15.6 percent.

Trump Defense Boost Would Mean Big Gains for Some States
Democrats likely to hold line for parity with nondefense programs

Brian Schatz, whose state of Hawaii is the No. 3 recipient of per-capita defense spending, says there must be parity in domestic spending to go with any boost to national security programs. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

A request from the Trump administration for a double-digit increase in defense spending could be largely decided by lawmakers whose states are far from equal players when it comes to the benefits of a bigger military budget.

That’s long been the case, as geographic, historic and strategic differences across the country result in more of an economic boost in certain states. But the differences are even more starkly displayed in a new Pew Charitable Trusts analysis that shows the funding split across all 50 states and the District of Columbia on a per-capita basis.

Who Could Replace Ohio Rep. Jim Renacci in Congress?
Four-term congressman is running for governor in 2018

Ohio Rep. James B. Renacci announced Monday he’s running for governor in 2018. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call File Photo)

Ohio Rep. James B. Renacci is running for governor in 2018 and will leave behind a Republican seat in the 16th District. 

The four-term congressman made the announcement Monday morning in an introductory video playing up his business credentials and touting himself as an outsider in the mold of President Donald Trump, whom he backed during last year’s election.  

Looking for Clues From a 2005 Special Election in Ohio
Instead of comparing Democratic enthusiasm to tea party, go further back in time

Democrat Paul Hackett narrowly lost a special election in a heavily Republican district in Ohio in 2005. (Mike Simons/Getty Images file photo)

Are Democrats in the early stages of their own tea party movement? It’s one of the biggest outstanding questions at this point in the cycle. But as we collectively look at the past for prologue, I don’t understand why our memories only go back eight years.

There was a time, not too long ago, when Democrats were out of the White House and in the minority in both chambers of Congress, and a demoralizing presidential election loss helped jump-start a movement back to the majority.

Ryan Hasn’t ‘Given Thought’ to Members’ Health Care Coverage
Speaker says GOP health care plan is ‘on track and on schedule’

House Speaker Paul Ryan says the House is working “hand in glove” with the White House on a health care plan that can pass Congress. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Paul D. Ryan has put a lot of thought into the health care bill moving through the House, but one thing that hasn’t crossed his mind is how members of Congress will get their health care.

The 2010 health care overhaul required lawmakers and their staff to enroll in health care programs created by the law as a means to have them understand the effects of it. But after questions arose, the Office of Personnel Management ruled that members and staff could enroll in the District of Columbia’s small business exchange to maintain the employers’ contribution toward health care costs.

Word on the Hill: D.C. and Guns
Save the date for Dine Out Day

Cherry blossoms were covered with ice on the East Front of the Capitol after snow and freezing rain fell over the region on Tuesday. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

With gun sales on the decline in the U.S. since President Donald Trump took office, WalletHub conducted a study to find out which states were the most dependent on the gun industry.

The District of Columbia topped the list for highest average wages and benefits in the firearms industry at $348,325. That’s more than 10 times higher than New Mexico, which came in last at $34,232.